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Old 12-03-2006, 08:44 PM   #11
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OK, major gross out on the 50 year old food there StirBlue. I knew about the old beans bit, but I didn't know about the higher elevation thing! *forehead slap* THAT explains a lot for me. Sigh. Going to toss out that bag of beans in my pantry.
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Old 12-04-2006, 04:53 AM   #12
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Maybe I missed it but I didn't notice anyone mentioning beans need to be presoaked. You shouldn't just throw dried beans in a pot and expect them to cook up nice and tender. I do the 10 minute "quick soak" most of the time, but if I'm planning ahead I soak them overnight.

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Old 12-04-2006, 08:59 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StirBlue
In Utah, people have been known to inherit a food storage that is over 50 years old. "Old food, is No food!"
Don't remind me. When my MIL moved in with use last year, she wanted all her cooking stuff over. Needless to say, I pitched a lot of her seasonings, as they were just way to old, like 20 years old. The herbs had lost color, and had no flavor, but she insisted on using them.
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Old 12-04-2006, 11:44 AM   #14
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Like everyone said they were probably old. I always throw mine in the pressure cooker and cook a tad longer to take care of the pre-soak Fraidy is talking about. To do a quick pre-soak just bring your beans to a boil, turn off heat, cover, and let sit for 1 hour. Then start from there.
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Old 12-04-2006, 11:59 AM   #15
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I know there`s a method used for Maise and such things that involves them being boiled in a Hydroxide, often Calcium hydroxide or even Potassium hydroxide from ashes.
it might be interesting from an experimental point of veiw to keep a few of these beans back and try it on them :)

yes even Sodium Hydroxide (Lye) has been used also in the food industry.

if you DO decide to have a go with this, then PLEASE do NOT use ANY aluminium cookware! it will destroy it.
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Old 12-04-2006, 06:28 PM   #16
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YT...What isle did you find that stuff on? We're gonna have to keep an eye on you before you start posting turtle wax recipes. I have a suspicion that you have cooked a turtle. If you were not unique, I wouldn't poke fun at you...love your post.
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Old 12-04-2006, 07:11 PM   #17
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Here's a site that will give you some ideas for your old beans:

http://www.homemakingcottage.com/hom...ings_pinto.htm
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Old 12-04-2006, 07:18 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by YT2095
I know there`s a method used for Maise and such things that involves them being boiled in a Hydroxide, often Calcium hydroxide or even Potassium hydroxide from ashes.
it might be interesting from an experimental point of veiw to keep a few of these beans back and try it on them :)

yes even Sodium Hydroxide (Lye) has been used also in the food industry.

if you DO decide to have a go with this, then PLEASE do NOT use ANY aluminium cookware! it will destroy it.
While it's true that bases will cause breakdown and therefore softening of food, it may prove somewhat dangerous to do. Strong bases such as sodum hydroxide would be dangerous if used beyond a certain amount. The amount the human body can tolerate is very small. Weaker bases such as calcium hydroxide (lime water) may be marginally safer but still dangerous. In addition, calcium hydroxide will give an unpleasant taste to the food. It is better to experiment with very weak bases which pose a much lower health risk. But is saving some old beans worth all this trouble? Finally, please bear in mind that breaking food down through the action of a base is the process that is foreign to the human body which breaks down food by the action of acid (hydrochloric acid produced in the stomach).
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Old 12-04-2006, 07:50 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by boufa06
While it's true that bases will cause breakdown and therefore softening of food, it may prove somewhat dangerous to do. Strong bases such as sodum hydroxide would be dangerous if used beyond a certain amount. The amount the human body can tolerate is very small. Weaker bases such as calcium hydroxide (lime water) may be marginally safer but still dangerous. In addition, calcium hydroxide will give an unpleasant taste to the food. It is better to experiment with very weak bases which pose a much lower health risk. But is saving some old beans worth all this trouble? Finally, please bear in mind that breaking food down through the action of a base is the process that is foreign to the human body which breaks down food by the action of acid (hydrochloric acid produced in the stomach).
I use calcium hydroxide to soak corn making nixtamal, something like hominy, which is then ground into a corn masa for tortillas or tamales. the trick is to rinse very well afterward. Actually you not only rinse it but also rub the outer hull off the kernel. I've never heard of adding it to beans. If you were going to do something like that it might be better to use baking soda instead but I wouldn't even suggest that.
Quote:
Originally Posted by jeterlover
I am trying to find out if there is a solution to my chili beans. I soaked pinto beans over night, they have been cooking for 5 hours and are still hard as a rock. Is there any help in sight? I don't cook very well. I am trying to find easy recipes so I can get away from the "Hamburger helper" scene. Someone please help.
Thanks,
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I cook beans two or three times a week and maybe I've just been lucky but have never experienced them staying hard as a rock after soaking, then simmering five hours, even if they'd been in the cupboard for years (never 15 years though). If you only had a pound to start with I'd suggest tossing them and getting some new but you if you've got 50 lb. bags the pressure cooker route might be worth a try.
I commend your escape from hamburger helper. Please let us know how it's working out.
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Old 12-05-2006, 05:07 AM   #20
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there we go: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hominy
I knew I wasn`t Trippin` :)

"Nixtamal" might be another usefull search word to plug into google also.
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