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Old 05-11-2006, 05:52 PM   #21
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I recently puchased some Havarti. Teh flavor is very buterry, and a bit salty. It's really good cheese when you bring it to room temperature, and allow it to roll around on your tongue a bit. I used it together with some freshly grated Parmesano Regiano, a bit of colby (small amount), and some left-over gruyere that was sitting in my fridge. The Havarti and Parmesano cheeses took center stage, with the other two added for complexity and flavor depth.

The cheese was added to a classic Bechemel and stirred in until silky sommoth over low heat. I used this sauce to top an herb-baked chicken over zetti pasta that was flavored with a bit of EVOO. This isn't cheese macaroni by far. And was it ever great. The flavors belnded admirably, with the flavoroful cheese sauce (and I do mean lots of cheese flavor with the silky smooth Bechemel acting as the flavor carrier) complementing the oregano, garlic, alt, and sweet onion flavors of the chicken, all that on top of whole grain pasta with EVOO.

Though this dish is primarily a cheese macaroni type meal, but with the cheese added as a sauce on top rather than mixed in, with chicken, it is more elegant, prettier, and more satisfying, at least for me. It is every bit as much a comfort food as its simpler cousin. I mean, what's more comfortable that cheese macaroni and baked chicken?

So next time you're in the mood for cheese mac, try this combination, with whatever cheeses you choose. Because, as I've said again and again, a great sauce is only great if you like it. And as long as you use the proper technique for adding the cheese, and taste as you go, you can use virtually any cheese, or cheese combination you like for flavor. For those of you who like ripened cheeses, use a good camembert, or brie. For veined cheese lovers, there are all ov the blue cheeses, Roqueforts, Gorgonzola, etc. For mild and creamy cheese lovers, you can use goat, or feta, or Havarti, Muenster, etc. For hard cheese lovers, aged cheddar (I'm talking five years here, kids) Parmesano Regiano, Romano, Asiago, etc.

Add herbs to the mix. in the words of a particular rock group, YOU CAN DO IT!

Get creative.

I'm thinking my next cheese sauce may be comprized of simply Havarti, butter, and cream, maybe with some fresh chives mixed in. Yum. I can taste it now.

Seeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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Old 02-03-2009, 09:47 AM   #22
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Hey - I made a GREAT Mac & Cheese last night using all leftovers except for the elbow macaroni!!

For Super Bowl Sunday I had made a big bowl of classic Velveeta/Salsa dip (1 pound of Velveeta microwaved with 1 cup of Hot Pace Salsa until melted through). Had about 1/2 a bowl left over. Cooked 1 pound of Barilla Elbow Macaroni pasta until al dente & drained. Remelted dip in the microwave. In the pasta pot, sauteed 6 sliced leftover turkey franks in some extra-virgin olive oil until browned. Added drained pasta & melted dip & stirred gently to combine. Piled all into a 9 x 13 butter-greased baking dish, topped with buttered breadcrumbs & baked for 25 minutes. Served with a big green salad. Terrific meal for very little $$.
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Old 02-06-2009, 02:49 PM   #23
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A good english mature cheddar.

Nothing else needed, best mac and cheese ever in my opinion :P

Just pasta and melted cheese mmm.
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Old 04-10-2009, 06:22 PM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jennyema View Post
One of the reasons that you would use bechemel sauce is that oftentimes cheese (harder like chaddar and gruyere) will not melt very nicely if just added to hot pasta or to cream or milk.. They can get stringy, rather than creamy..

And I never dirty two pots when I make bechemal mac and cheese. I boil the pasta, drain it and let it sit in the colander with a little butter. I maker the bechemel sauce in the same pot and then add the pasta back in.

You only need one pot and a colander.

I make mine the exact same way! One pot and one baking dish is all I use!
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Old 04-10-2009, 06:33 PM   #25
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I'm still confused about the title of this thread. If the mac and cheese was so good and there was no roux, how is it pointless?
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Old 04-10-2009, 06:39 PM   #26
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Originally Posted by Callisto in NC View Post
I'm still confused about the title of this thread. If the mac and cheese was so good and there was no roux, how is it pointless?

I believe the intent of the thread title is that the mac and cheese was so good without a roux, that making mac and cheese with a roux is pointless.
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Old 04-10-2009, 07:38 PM   #27
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i added a dash of dry mustard and hot sauce to my cheese sauce.
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Old 04-10-2009, 08:17 PM   #28
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I agree, the title is misleading. I always use a roux for my mac and cheese. It just has the kind of consistancy I really love. There's one recipe I like without it, that a buddy of mine made once. It has a little egg, butter, milk and tons cheese (with the macaroni of course) and that's it. Bake till melty. It's definetely not a creamy recipe but it is very very delicious.
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Old 04-10-2009, 08:36 PM   #29
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I agree, the title is misleading. I always use a roux for my mac and cheese. It just has the kind of consistancy I really love. There's one recipe I like without it, that a buddy of mine made once. It has a little egg, butter, milk and tons cheese (with the macaroni of course) and that's it. Bake till melty. It's definetely not a creamy recipe but it is very very delicious.
Thanks Eva Marie ~ I guess maybe if the title was "great mac and cheese without the roux" it would make a lot more sense. To me the title now says "mac and cheese without roux is pointless, why bother?" I've only made mac and cheese twice, both with a roux, I can't see doing it without it.
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Old 04-10-2009, 08:58 PM   #30
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The thread was started about three years ago and the OP hasn't been around for over a year. He probably won't see the suggested correction.
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