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Old 04-08-2007, 11:30 AM   #11
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Not constant but frequent stirring.

It does take a little more attention than other rice dishes but none of the steps is difficult.
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Old 04-08-2007, 01:22 PM   #12
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I make a red wine and radicchio risotto - goes extremely well with lamb!

Corey - it requires a hot liquid - broth of some kind gives a more intense flavor - I use the low sodium variety canned broths when necessary. I usually add some wine for the first addition of liquid - white wine most of the time but occasionally red, for the recipe mentioned above. I also usually begin with sauteed shallots too.

Making risotto is no big deal. Patience is the key. Don't hurry it. It should take somewhere around 18 minutes once the liquid is initially added. Sometimes it can take a few more minutes.

Things to add to risotto:

scallops
shrimp
fresh peas
pea pods
asparagus
spring onions
red pepper

The sky is the limit!

I finish off with some freshly grated Parmesan and sometimes a touch of cream.

Michael - the Thai rice I am used to cooking with needs to be soaked for about 6 hours first but then again I steam mine. The Thai rice I have is a skinny rice - arborio is a fat rice. Please let us know how this turns out! Arborio is the most readily available risotto rice in my area so that's what I use.
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Old 04-08-2007, 02:55 PM   #13
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If you used a commercial broth, or made from granule or cube, there is absolutely no need for added salt!! Very often I dilute it further to make it less salty, when I am to add something like gorgonzola or speck (salty agent). Using some wine (red or white, depending on the ingredient) to the liquid addition gives a depth in its flavour. Add the wine when you finish your sautčing procedure, before the broth goes in. (And you need to keep the broth hot)
For rice, carnaroli is the ideal choice for risotto.
The reason it requires frequent attention/stirring is because a risotto needs to be cooked with small amount of liquid, which to be added as needed by ladleful at a time. If left alone, it will easily burn and stick at the bottom. The technique make it possible to have each morsel of rice coated by that gooey flavourful sauce, and definitely worth the effort!
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Old 04-08-2007, 06:00 PM   #14
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I agree that patience is the key with risotto. You need to make sure each ladleful is absorbed before adding the next one. When the rice is al dente, I take it off the heat and add a large dollop of butter and lots of black pepper.

My favourite risotto dishes are:
  • Mushroom, lemon and spinach - add the spinach at the end with the butter and pepper so it just wilts.
  • Asparagus
  • Roast butternut pumpkin - put half of the pumpkin in with the rice as you cook it so it breaks up and flavours and colours the rice and then fold through the rest at the end.
  • Tomato and peas - canned tomatoes are fine.
These work well but you can really do anything. You can even do sweet risotto with chocolate!
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Old 04-08-2007, 07:50 PM   #15
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I have been wanting to try making risotto for years. I am afraid I'll end up with an inedible grainy blob - I would love to try a mushroom/parm risotto. I had something similar at a dinner party last fall and I swooned it was so good.

I may have to put making risotto this week on my "to do" list because you people have inspired me!
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Old 04-08-2007, 11:09 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kitchenelf
I make a red wine and radicchio risotto - goes extremely well with lamb!

Corey - it requires a hot liquid - broth of some kind gives a more intense flavor - I use the low sodium variety canned broths when necessary. I usually add some wine for the first addition of liquid - white wine most of the time but occasionally red, for the recipe mentioned above. I also usually begin with sauteed shallots too.

Making risotto is no big deal. Patience is the key. Don't hurry it. It should take somewhere around 18 minutes once the liquid is initially added. Sometimes it can take a few more minutes.

Things to add to risotto:

scallops
shrimp
fresh peas
pea pods
asparagus
spring onions
red pepper

The sky is the limit!

I finish off with some freshly grated Parmesan and sometimes a touch of cream.

Michael - the Thai rice I am used to cooking with needs to be soaked for about 6 hours first but then again I steam mine. The Thai rice I have is a skinny rice - arborio is a fat rice. Please let us know how this turns out! Arborio is the most readily available risotto rice in my area so that's what I use.


I also saw cream added to it as well.
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Old 04-09-2007, 05:41 PM   #17
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I made risotto with mushrooms, peas and onions for Easter and my father loved it. It is kind of time consuming, but if you don't make it all the time it is really good and different.
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Old 04-11-2007, 05:42 AM   #18
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In Italy we have have two philosophies

A) add the broth half cup at a time and wait until each addition is adsorbed before adding the next cup, stirring frequently.

B) add all the exact amount of broth at once and live without stirring until the rice it's cook

the first solution give a more creamy RISOTTO
the second solution it's making a more tastefully RISOTTO
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Old 04-11-2007, 06:42 AM   #19
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No stirring? If I don't it would get burnt at the bottom even if I have the flame at the lowest... is there any trick to achieve a risotto cooked evenly and not burnt with this technique?
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Old 04-11-2007, 06:58 AM   #20
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I have made "no stir" risotto before. Its ok, its ok. It does work. I like the fiddling with risotto though....its relaxing, and I do find that as Italian guy says, the sauce is creamier with a stirred risotto, and I don't find it less tasty...and its quicker IMO.

I enjoy the risotto process and infact, find it convienient to stri the pot frequently while compiling a salad...the two with the frequent interuptions to salad making to stir...end up done at about the same time ....a slow glass of wine time...and was a frequent mid week meal when I was working.
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