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Old 07-21-2005, 10:16 AM   #1
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Charlie D's Ukrainian Recipes

Charlie D - what are some foods that are pure (or close to it - I don't know if any kind of cooking is actually pure) Ukranian dishes and of course, we need recipes.

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Old 07-21-2005, 11:18 AM   #2
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Borscht (so called beet root soup) hot or cold

Green borscht (also know as schav, made with sorrel leaves or spinach due to availability problem) hot or cold

Rassol'nik (soup with kidneys and pickles)

Pampushki (garlic bread rolls, there are million recipes for them, so don't ask for one, it's too hard to choose)

Golubtsy (cabbage rolls)

Vareniki (ravioli)

Buzhanina (the closest thing to description I can think of is a cold cut made out of pork),

Pirozhki (also known as pirogi)

Nalistniki (also known as blintzes)

Zharkoe (meat stew)



The list goes on, but those ones in my opinion are more prevalent for Ukraine and very common in everyday cooking. If there is a specific dish or a particular ingredient or a recipe for one of the above/all of the above some body is interested I’ll try to find out an answer. As my recipes are all in Russian/Ukrainian I will need time to translate, so please be patient.

P.S. Onw thing I can add all of them are time consumming to make.
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Old 07-21-2005, 11:22 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CharlieD
[color=black]P.S. One thing I can add all of them are time consumming to make.
A lot of the best things are
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Old 07-21-2005, 11:26 AM   #4
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Pick a couple of your favorites CharlieD and share your recipes - and we're not opposed to having all your recipes
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Old 07-21-2005, 11:37 AM   #5
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I'm sure you're not.

Okay here is one i have translated. Though it really is not a summer dish:

Zharkoe:



That is Ukrainian meat stew





Do you have a Dutch oven? You are going to need one.


I use either chicken or short ribs, or stew meet; shank is really good.
My Dutch oven is pretty big, I can cook probably up to 6-7 pounds of meat.

So lets say:

3-31/2 lb meat of your choosing;


Or 1 whole chicken or chicken parts about that weight
1 large or 2 medium onions.
2-3-tb spoons oil
½ t baking soda
1-2 quarts boiling water
Salt, pepper to taste.

I do not like onion, so I try to cut it so small when it’s cooked it is almost non-existent.
Heat up oil in the Dutch oven. Slice onion into little squares. For those who can speak normal English (unlike me) that’s called dicing. Put into oil and sauté until it is golden brown, but do not burn. Add baking soda and pour about a cup of boiling water over it. Stir the whole mixture. Add meat, season it and fry until it is brown on all sides. 10-15 min or so depends on meat and how you cut it. I usually try to have 2-inch cubes or chicken I like to cut into eighth. Add water just to barely cover the meat and cook it for about half an hour or so. Now if it is chicken I add water to cover meat completely stir it and put in the oven 220-230 and just cook it uncovered till it is done (about one hour). With beef, I like to put in the oven and cook it all night or 5-6-7 hours. Last hour or so uncover it Of course if I do not have time I just cook till it is ready on the stove top. Now there are things you can do after. I.e. I add potato, or rice, or potato and carrots, or potato and beans, or really you can put other veggies. Or do not do anything just serve with a side dish of your choosing. If you do that then do not add water second time. Some time before it is done taste and re-season. Now if I add veggies, I like to take meat out, cook potato and than add meat back, at the end, reheat and serve. If you ad potato, beans or carrots it doesn’t really matter ho much water you have in the pot, but if it is rice you should make sure to add amount of rice that by the time it is ready there is no water left. It depends on type of rice you use. The rice I use usually doubles in amount so for every cup of water in the pot (approximately) I add half a cup of rise. Very important to check for seasoning because rise and beans especially, will need extra salt to be added.

Now I hope you enjoy it. If you do not understand my babbling here please ask, I’ll try to explain better. Really zharkoe is one of the easiest things to make. But if it is done properly it will have this beautiful brown to a dark brown color and taste really good. Nothing like a bowl of zharkoe on the cold day. I do not make it as much in the summer, but in the winter it is one of my and my family’s favorites.


P.S. extra onion wouldn't hurt. Gives extra flavor.
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Old 07-21-2005, 11:42 AM   #6
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Sounds great Charlie - I'll save this for one of our first cold days!
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Old 07-21-2005, 11:44 AM   #7
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charlie thast sounds fabulous !! thank you for posting it
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Old 07-21-2005, 11:48 AM   #8
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And here is something that goes really well with that Zharkoe:

Pickled tomato


No canning required, but you will not be able to pickle them in the refrigerator. The pickling, that takes 2 to 3 weeks, has to be done at the room temperature. I recommend the kitchen, but as far away from stove as possible.



The recipe is very simple. I buy a box of tomatoes at the farmers market. It fills in the big pail that I have. I bought one in restaurant supply store, but you can use an enamel-plated pot. Or even a jar, if you make a little bit. As I make to last the whole winter I make 2 big pails, I think they are like 5 gallons or so.



Okay here is the recipe.





The recipe is for 5-gallon pail:



Tomatoes to fill pail almost to the top.

Dill one bunch, that is sold in the store or the farmers market is enough, if you like dill a lot, like I do, you can use 2 bunches.

Celery stalks 3, cut up in the 2-3 Inc pieces.

Hot pepper 3. I buy those long red or yellow ones; have no idea what they called.

Garlic 1

Salt 4 tablespoons for every 3 litter/quarts of water

Bay leaves few

Allspice and Black peppercorn; each about a t-spoon. I just grab it with 3 fingers whatever comes out is good enough.



Now the hot pepper will make tomato spicy, my mom puts only one I like a little bit spicier so I use 3, but I do not like spicy food so you can add more if you like spicy food, but not too much, at least first time.



Wash the tomatoes, peppers and dill. Cut up dill, put some to cover the bottom of the pail.

Put tomatoes, pepper, celery, and garlic. Make sure that garlic cloves, peppers, celery and dill is evenly spread through out the pail. Leave some dill to have enough to cover tomatoes on the top. Dissolve pickling salt in a little bit of the hot water and add the rest of cold water to fill the proportion above. My pail I can fill with 9 quarts of water. Just enough to cover tomatoes. Add allspice and black peppercorn. Spread the rest of dill on the top.

Now you have to keep them (the tomatoes) down and covered. I spread the cheesecloth over it and put big diner plate on the top, and then I put weight on the top. There is no exact since on how much weight. You can start with 2-litter soda bottle, but then in the week or even sooner you should switch to something lighter, like a quart or so. If there is not enough weight it is not a big problem if there is too much, tomato will get smashed. There is a debate about tomatoes, red or green, I use both. When I make a lot and set aside for the winter, I just eat the red ones first and the green ones I live for the latter. This year I had one jar of green ones left in June they were still awesome. The harder the tomato the lower on the bottom it should go, and the softer - the higher, of course.

Now comes the part my wife hates. It stinks well I like the smell. It takes 2 to 3 weeks for the pickling process, depends on the temperature in the kitchen, I do it in the kitchen. Tomatoes will get covered with something that looks like mildew, at this point you have to take plate and cloth of, rinse it and put it back. You should not allow mildew to build up and stay because tomatoes will taste like that mildew, yuck. In about two weeks you should taste them, and if they are ready (if they are not they will have some what weird and bitter taste, if yes it should remind you of dill pickles taste), slowly take them one by one, slowly rinse under cold water and put in the clean jar, then drain the pickling juice (for those who speak English that’s brine ;) ) through the clean cheesecloth right into the jar to cover tomatoes. Take some garlic cloves and if you like your tomatoes to be spicy add one pepper, make sure to rinse them too.

I keep my tomatoes in the refrigerator. If everything was clean they will stay clean the whole winter, if not they may have some mildew build up on the top. Then you should take out and clean it up. It is not a problem in the end.







P.S.



The spices and the greens that I put into tomato are really not carved in the stone, or whatever the saying is. For example back in Ukraine we used to add things like horseradish leaves, leaves of the cherry tree and leaves of black currant. Last year I added green capers, but this year I did not have any. So, if you are going to do that more than ones you can experiment
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Old 07-21-2005, 01:59 PM   #9
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Charlie, I would love to see your recipe for pirohzki. Mine is passed down from my Baba and I would love to see yours. I'll post mine too.

Sorry, also, do you have a recipe for holupchi (sp?), we have always made the sour cabbage kind, and I am looking for one that has the three grains in it. Buckwheat, rice and barley. I have been looking for this for a LOOOONG time. Hoping you can help.
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Old 07-22-2005, 11:19 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alix
Charlie, I would love to see your recipe for pirohzki. Mine is passed down from my Baba and I would love to see yours. I'll post mine too.

Sorry, also, do you have a recipe for holupchi (sp?), we have always made the sour cabbage kind, and I am looking for one that has the three grains in it. Buckwheat, rice and barley. I have been looking for this for a LOOOONG time. Hoping you can help.
Let’s decide what do we call things here, Golubtsy, or as it is pronounced in Ukrainian Holuptsy, are cabbage rolls.

I do not know what “holupchi” are. So if you could describe a little bit more, what it is exactly. The pronunciation changes and names get misused with time, nothing strange about that. So we might be calling the same thing completely different name.



The pirozhki, what kind do you make? I make both the pastry dough and the yeast kind. But really prefer the pastry, first of all for the taste and second of all, for convenience to be able to buy ready made frozen pastry dough.
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