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Old 12-14-2012, 08:11 AM   #11
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The leaves in a jar are a definite challenge. I serve them at room temperature with plain yogurt. If i had access to fresh grape leaves, I would definitely use them.
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Old 12-14-2012, 08:15 AM   #12
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The above link does not give us the recipe from Jeff Smith. If anyone is interested, I'll post it.
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Old 12-14-2012, 09:25 AM   #13
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Is it a hot dish or a cold one?
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The reason I asked is that there are two different dishes (at least) that I'm accustomed to that are made with grape leaves. One is a hot dish often served with other stuffed vegetables. It's called dolma in Armenian and dolmades in Greek. The other dish is an appetizer served cold/room temperature.
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Old 12-14-2012, 02:07 PM   #14
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The reason I asked is that there are two different dishes (at least) that I'm accustomed to that are made with grape leaves. One is a hot dish often served with other stuffed vegetables. It's called dolma in Armenian and dolmades in Greek. The other dish is an appetizer served cold/room temperature.
When are they called dolmas and when are they dolmadakia? When I lived in a Greek neighbourhood in Montreal I used to buy dolmadakia made by an Armenian lady who had a small store. They seem to be the same thing as dolmades, but she made the best ones I ever tasted.
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Old 12-14-2012, 02:28 PM   #15
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When are they called dolmas and when are they dolmadakia? When I lived in a Greek neighbourhood in Montreal I used to buy dolmadakia made by an Armenian lady who had a small store. They seem to be the same thing as dolmades, but she made the best ones I ever tasted.
According to Greek Recipes with May Lerios: Dolmadakia or Dolmades:

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A dolmadaki is one of the wraps you'll make; the plural is dolmadakia. The Greek word dolmadaki is actually a direct form of the Turkish word dolma, which means stuffed or filled: all that Greek adds is the standard Greek -aki ending meaning little one. So a dolmadaki is literally a little stuffed wrap. The dish is also called dolmades which is the plural of dolmas, esp. if you use large grape leaves and thus the wraps are somewhat larger.
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Old 12-14-2012, 02:45 PM   #16
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Check out this page from Wikipedia. Dolma - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia It gives a nice overview of the variations.

If you scroll down about half way down the page, you'll see a section starting, "In Armenian cuisine..." This gives a good description of the hot dish. In our Armenian circles we referred to the stuffed rolled cabbage and grape leves as sarma and the stuffed vegetables (peppers, tomatoes, zucchini) as dolma.

Further down the page, in the section beginning, "In Turkey...", there is reference to "yalancı dolma". This is a cold appetizer served as part of a meze course prior to the main meal. We call this yalangi.

The real message you get from this page should be that dishes are not bound by political borders. A stuffed grape (or cabbage) leaf is a staple in many cultures across thousands of miles on several continents. It doesn't belong to anyone culture. There are variations based on local preferences.
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Old 12-14-2012, 02:48 PM   #17
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Thanks GG.
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Old 12-14-2012, 05:13 PM   #18
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The leaves in a jar are a definite challenge. I serve them at room temperature with plain yogurt. If i had access to fresh grape leaves, I would definitely use them.
I don't know about grape season in FL, but here in SE Ontario, our grape leaves are the right size about mid-June to July. I use wild grape leaves, which are abundant in the area--we have tons of wild grape vines at the farm where they are not exposed to any pesticides, exhaust fumes, etc. I usually harvest about 400 leaves the size of my hand (I wear a size 7-8 glove) and freeze the end product. I keep telling myself to freeze the leaves for use in the winter, but I never seem to get there. If there is a vineyard near you, you might be able to harvest some leaves...or, if there are wild grape vines that grow where you are.
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