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Old 02-17-2006, 10:32 AM   #11
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It's certainly a Japanese dish, but not very Japanese if the katakana writing on the serviette has anything to do with it. The Japanese use katakana for foreign words, they use Hiragana for Japanese original words.
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Old 02-17-2006, 10:55 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ironchef
Looks like:

Oyster, obviously. I can't tell what it is by the shell but it looks like the same size and shape of a Kumamoto oyster. But Kumamoto shells usually have ribbed edges.
Quail Egg yolk
Uni (Sea Urchin) roe
Tobiko (Flying Fish eggs)
Shoyu or some type of seaweed (konbu?) gelee, or perhaps kanten
Green seaweed or maybe scallion? I looks like scallion from the color but not the shape. It has the contours of seaweed.
ic is dead on, as usual.

i'm not sure, but they are probably kumamotos, since the egg, most likely quail, is small, therefore the oyster would then be small, like a kumamoto.
i also agree about the gelatin, probably seaweed.

the green stuff is either scallion, or another sea veg that i can't remember the name. i've had it with baby octopus salad, korean style.
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Old 02-17-2006, 02:53 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jikoni
It's certainly a Japanese dish, but not very Japanese if the katakana writing on the serviette has anything to do with it. The Japanese use katakana for foreign words, they use Hiragana for Japanese original words.
It's a generic brand chopstick wrapper is all.
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Old 02-18-2006, 03:14 PM   #14
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ok, i remembered the last ingredient. i think the green stuff was chopped dropwort.
i've seen it as an ingredient on the lid of korean octopus salad, and the only thing i couldn't identify in the dish was the green stuff in it, so i assumed it was the dropwort.
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Old 02-18-2006, 04:11 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by buckytom
ok, i remembered the last ingredient. i think the green stuff was chopped dropwort.
i've seen it as an ingredient on the lid of korean octopus salad, and the only thing i couldn't identify in the dish was the green stuff in it, so i assumed it was the dropwort.
BT, can you ask the Koreans that you work with what the name of dropwort is in Korean? Thanks in advance.
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Old 02-19-2006, 02:16 AM   #16
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will do ic.
unfortunately, koreans are a, shall we say, disciplined and formal society. most cooking (and just about everything else that matters around a home) is done by women, and they are strictly controlled by their, umm, regimen.
since the often gregarious and friendly men of the house know very little of the foods they eat, i think initial attempts to bridge a language gap might be difficult. even my korean friends, whom are very americanized, still live by these principles. i can't fault them for it, but only try to understand (against all decency towards women).
i have made preliminary inroads with the neighbors' elder women, trading veggies and the occasional helping hand. i think this spring when i'm turning and tilling my garden ,i'll run the big machine over to theirs to help out. they'll probably object, but when a gardener sees well worked fluffy soil, how can you complain. again, it's all about the soil.
they're amazed that a man takes time away from "work" to garden - boy do they have their women snowed (how many soju at the after hours karaoke meeting today?)..., take care of the yard, cook, and help raise the baby.
i realize that i'm viewed by them down their noses, but it also scares them that they're being outdone. it is after all a macho society.
in a recent snow storm, 3 young guys in their late teens, early 20's stood around watching their dad try to back the car out of the driveway, spinning his wheels forever. after watching their futility, i walked over, grabbed the bumper, and pushed the car out into the street, like i was superman. it was like a miracle happened. embarassed thank yous followed.
then the men left, leaving a 20 inch snow storm for the two 80 plus year old grandmas to dig out. it was embarrasing, so i helped dig them out.

i'm hoping to be able to learn a whole lot about the nuances of korean cuisine, now that a kind of dialogue has begun. i love it, as well as many aspects of korean culture, but is needs to be done with the utmost respect for their system.
you don't survive a millenia of japanese cruelty by faking it, so i'm guessing i have a lot to learn.
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Old 02-19-2006, 05:50 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cipher
Can someone identify this dish for me? I think it's Japanese.
Excuse me for stating the obvious - but, you could probably find the name of the dish wherever you found that photo - and possibly the recipe, too. I would certainly be interested in that info - the dish looks very interesting.
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Old 02-19-2006, 03:50 PM   #18
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I think the Koreans that live on the East Coast are different that the ones that live on the West Coast/Hawaii. Some of the Koreans that I know are fairly traditional (both those born here and those born in Korea) but not nearly to the extent of what you've seen. I've seen quite a few instances where the women outrank the men, both in the family and in the workforce.
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Old 02-19-2006, 11:49 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael in FtW
Excuse me for stating the obvious - but, you could probably find the name of the dish wherever you found that photo - and possibly the recipe, too. I would certainly be interested in that info - the dish looks very interesting.
The photo was posted by someone else at a another website who was wondering what it was. So far he hasn't got an answer...
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Old 02-21-2006, 12:36 PM   #20
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I will ask about the word for dropwort.
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