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Old 09-02-2004, 04:47 PM   #11
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I am pretty sure that Chicken Kiev is actually an American dish.
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Old 09-05-2004, 02:26 AM   #12
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GB - right, and even if it were a namesake dish of Kiev, that's in Ukraine, not Russia.
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Old 09-05-2004, 08:11 AM   #13
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When I cook for people from other countries, I rarely try to make anything from their homeland! I'm bound to suffer in comparison. I go the other way, make my very best specialties, THEN (and here is where you can get close to your hopeful paramour) you ask, gee, I'd love to learn how to cook a Russian meal; will you come over and show me?
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Old 09-07-2004, 05:39 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by velochic
As a person with a degree in Slavic Linguistics and a former resident of Moscow, I'll give you a nice "Russian" recipe. Not Soviet, not Siberian, just plain old Russian. It's called "Myaso po Derevinsky" or "Meat Village-Style". I make it occasionally to remind myself of the days in Russia.
Hi,

I'm not sure anybody can call it "Russian". As I know, this dish is called "Myaso po-francuzski" or "French-style meat" throughout Russia. :D

If somebody wants to cook something really russian, I'd suggest to try this: http://www.russianfoods.com/recipes/...0B/default.asp.

2 velochic: if you didn't try something like this when you were in Russia, then you missed something important. :-)

Alexander.
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Old 09-07-2004, 09:20 AM   #15
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Uncle Sasha, the Zharkoye sounds wonderful, I'm sure going to try it!
What cut of beef would you recommend for this dish?
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Old 09-07-2004, 09:55 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wasabi woman
What cut of beef would you recommend for this dish?
Any. :)

Seriously, that doesn't matter to me. I would better increase the time of stewing (up to 1 hour or even more); just ensure that the temperature in the oven is about 150-180 degrees (C). This will make the beef a bit softer.

Also, you may try to replace beef with chicken -- in this case 45 minutes in the oven would be quite enough.

Simplified version of "Zharkoe" (just beef, potatos, and spices) is also OK.

Alexander.
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Old 09-07-2004, 03:36 PM   #17
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Spasibo balshoye Uncle Sasha!
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Old 09-08-2004, 02:20 AM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wasabi woman
Spasibo balshoye Uncle Sasha!
Ne za chto. :)
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Old 09-10-2004, 03:01 PM   #19
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Well Uncle Sasha, my neighbor next door to me, on the 14th floor of the Olympyskaya Derevyna taught me this recipe and when I asked her where she got it, she said it was an old Russian recipe she learned from her mother growing up in a village near Moscow, Alexandrov. She never mentioned that it was French, and besides, this doesn't sound much like a French dish to me. I respect the fact that you are Russian, but it's a big country... and this dish is authentic from its source.
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Old 10-06-2004, 09:58 PM   #20
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From the now closed famous Russian Tea Room, a restaurant I used to dine in many times in Manhattan, with my favorite, BLINI with CAVIAR:

Buckwheat Blinis with Sevruga Caviar & Tobermory Scottish Smoked Salmon

Serves: 6

INGREDIENTS:

4 ounces Sevruga Caviar

6 ounces Tobermory Scottish Smoked Salmon (sliced thinly)

1/2 c. sour cream

1/4 c. clarified butter

BLINI MIX: (Yields 1/2 quart)

8 oz. buckwheat flour

4 oz. all purpose flour

3 1/2 oz. sugar

3 1/4 c. milk

3 eggs, slightly beaten

2 oz. butter, melted

1/4 tsp. yeast

STEP 1: In a bowl, combine the buckwheat flour with the all purpose flour and sugar and set aside. In a saucepan, combine the milk, eggs, butter and yeast and heat to 105 degrees. Remove from heat. Whisk the dry ingredients with the liquid, mixing well. Strain through a china cap. Let the blini mix stand at room temperature for one hour. Refrigerate.

TO MAKE BLINI: Preheat a pancake griddle or large non-stick frying pan to 325 degrees. Lightly brush the surface with a small amount of melted butter. Stir down the batter and spoon about 3 tablespoons of blini mix unto the griddle forming 4" diameter blini. Cook for one minute or until the top is bubbly and the bottom golden. Flip with a spatula and cook an additional 30 seconds or until golden. Remove from heat and reserve warm.

TO ROLL BLINI: Place a few drops of clarified butter onto a warm serving plate. With a fork lay the blini topside down onto the plate. With the back of a spoon spread 1 teaspoon of sour cream evenly onto each blini. Place the smoked salmon onto one blini and a dollop of caviar onto the other. With a fork pierce the side of the blini and turn over to form a neat roll. Serve warm.

WINE NOTE: This dish is delicious when served with ice cold Vodka.
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