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Old 05-17-2006, 01:12 PM   #1
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What is Gremolata and how is it used?

Rxb was saying it was anchovy, lemon and parsley but I see from a google search it might be garlic, lemon and parsley. What is it and what to put it on?

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Old 05-17-2006, 01:17 PM   #2
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I think there are a number of variations for it. It's used as a sort of "finishing garnish/flavoring" on a number of Mediterranean dishes, most of which seem to contain lamb.
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Old 05-17-2006, 01:27 PM   #3
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Gremolata, the parsley, lemon and garlic, is a traditional enhancement for osso buco, a veal shank dish.
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Old 05-17-2006, 01:35 PM   #4
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Rxb is me? Gremolata is a sauce, effectively used for Ossibuchi (Andy, correct)or, more generally, with meats and tomatoes, and there are some versions. Galric is ok: in the other thread we were speaking of anchovies, so I've not posed the accent on garlic.
The anchovies (or not) is another story. In my house they had always been used, by my mother and her mother, milanese from generations, and my wife too: no ossibuchi without anchovies...But I have to admit that it seems not to be the original recipe. No anchovies. In every way, I prefer WITH.
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Old 05-17-2006, 01:50 PM   #5
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If you happen to have a little gremolate left over (or if you wish to make it for this purpose alone), it's lovely sprinkled over warm cream of chicken soup (and probably many other soups too) or stirred into basmati/jasmine rice
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Old 05-17-2006, 08:22 PM   #6
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I make a grilled pork medalion (or bone in chop for that matter) served over a reduced brown sauce and topped with a "spicy salsa" of anchovies, capers, Italian parsley. Like a gremolata the heat of the meat cooks the aromatic topping and the flavor is fantastic. This is in the same class of preparation, but from a different province no doubt.
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Old 05-17-2006, 08:44 PM   #7
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You can also make versions of gremolata to use in many other cuisines. A few possibilites could be:

Mexican: Jalapeno, Lime Zest, Garlic, Cilantro
Japanese: Ginger, Yuzu (or Lemon) Zest, Shiso, Scallion
Chinese: Ginger, Garlic, Scallion, Cilantro
Thai: Thai Chili, Kaffir Lime Zest, Ginger, Garlic, Thai Basil
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Old 05-17-2006, 10:37 PM   #8
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Nice idea on the regional variations, Iron chef...

I saw Paula Dean do one where she made some sort of sandwich, maybe it was like a BLT, then she stuck skewers of sprigs of thyme through each one. Then she drizzled some sort of gremolata on them, sans anchovies...Looked real nice.

Rdg, sorry, confused with another website. Funny you should mention your families use of anchovies. I figured out years after she died, that anhovies and/or sardines was grandma's secret ingredient in the tomato sauce. My mother could never duplicate it. I figured it out when I put anchovy in mine and it was just like grandmas.

Anyhow, my grandma was Milanese too!
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Old 05-18-2006, 05:54 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jpinmaryland
Rdg, sorry, confused with another website. Funny you should mention your families use of anchovies. I figured out years after she died, that anhovies and/or sardines was grandma's secret ingredient in the tomato sauce. My mother could never duplicate it. I figured it out when I put anchovy in mine and it was just like grandmas.

Anyhow, my grandma was Milanese too!
No problem, JP, I have the same discussion here in Italy with some friends of another forum, and the subject is the same: in gremolata, anchovies or not? . They say NO, I say YES. Without anchovies, Gremolata is lighter, "with" is tastier. Question of preference....
And, effectively, I have always used gremolada only with ossibuchi, i.e. with some tomatoes. May be that "this" is the real reason for which I like so much anchovies in gremolata. Anchovies and tomatoes.....
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Old 05-18-2006, 11:09 AM   #10
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So would someone please tell me how to make gremolta? This is something I know nothing about.
JP, when do you add the anchovies to the tomato sauce? I'd like to try that.
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