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Old 10-14-2008, 07:47 PM   #21
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I buy and use unsalted just because. I remember having this discussion when I first joined here and at the time I used margarine for everything, so I made a switch. But, Since I like my toast spread cold, butter wasn't working for me, too hard, so I also buy "spreadable" butter and always have both on hand.
I don't see how having both on hand would affect a budget. You use the one you prefer at the time, so the other stays untouched to be on hand another day. I do notice I go through butter sticks more quickly, but that's because I don't butter bread everyday (using the spreadable butter), but I tend to cook everyday. It does take up twice the room in the fridge though.
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Old 10-14-2008, 08:04 PM   #22
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You could always buy unsalted butter, then take two sticks and put them away, then take the other two sticks, melt em down, add some salt, then let them solidify back up. Then for the price of one you would have both...
No need to even go through that much trouble. Take a stick and roll it around in some salt then wrap it back up again or you could just sprinkle salt on whatever it is you are putting butter on. If you are making toast with butter then spread your butter on and then sprinkle a little salt on.
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Old 10-14-2008, 08:06 PM   #23
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You could always buy unsalted butter, then take two sticks and put them away, then take the other two sticks, melt em down, add some salt, then let them solidify back up. Then for the price of one you would have both...
My understanding is that once you add heat to butter, you shorten it's shelf life. I wouldn't want to chance making it rancid just to add salt. I'm sure someone else may know better than me, so feel free to correct me.
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Old 10-14-2008, 08:09 PM   #24
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I have no idea. One suggestion made for saving money was to melt butter down, add a cup of water, then let it solidify again. This doubles the amount of butter you originally had, but they make no mention of how it affects shelf life.
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Old 10-14-2008, 08:10 PM   #25
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No need to even go through that much trouble. Take a stick and roll it around in some salt then wrap it back up again or you could just sprinkle salt on whatever it is you are putting butter on. If you are making toast with butter then spread your butter on and then sprinkle a little salt on.
Yes, you could do that, but it's just not the same texture having salt sitting on your butter, sprinkled on, or salt that has been dissolved in your butter while it was being made. Probably has something to do with why I like creamy peanut butter over chunky.
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Old 10-14-2008, 08:12 PM   #26
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Yes, you could do that, but it's just not the same texture having salt sitting on your butter, sprinkled on, or salt that has been dissolved in your butter while it was being made. Probably has something to do with why I like creamy peanut butter over chunky.
Ohhhhhhh, there's a whole new thread for us!!

Cause I'm a chunky kinda guy.....
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Old 10-14-2008, 08:27 PM   #27
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I have no idea. One suggestion made for saving money was to melt butter down, add a cup of water, then let it solidify again. This doubles the amount of butter you originally had, but they make no mention of how it affects shelf life.

I think if you did that you'd have a container with solidified butter sitting on top of water.

There was a thread a while ago about making spreadable butter.
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Old 10-14-2008, 08:50 PM   #28
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You MIX 1 cup of water and a stick of butter together using a mixer and then put into a small tub and you will not know the difference and you've cut the price of your butter in half. It just cannot be used for baking.
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