"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Eggs, Cheese & Dairy
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 01-25-2008, 11:15 AM   #21
Master Chef
 
jennyema's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Boston
Posts: 9,260
How much are they charging for Eggland eggs where you live?

At my store they are $2.49 a dozen for large and the Stop and Shop store brand is $1.89. They are often on sale for less and there are frequently coupons in the Globe which make them cheaper than store brand.

Also, BJ's sells them in 2 dozen packs for pretty darn cheap.

I usually buy Eggland even when they aren't on sale because I think they taste better.

I don't look for them to give me Omega 3, though I do look for calcium in OJ
__________________

__________________
Less is not more. More is more and more is fabulous.
jennyema is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-25-2008, 11:23 AM   #22
Chef Extraordinaire
 
pacanis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: NW PA
Posts: 18,751
My hens' shells are noticably harder to crack. I take that as a good sign, that they are getting enough nutrients and calcium.
__________________

__________________
pacanis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-25-2008, 12:45 PM   #23
Master Chef
 
Chief Longwind Of The North's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA,Michigan
Posts: 9,229
Some people swear that brown eggs taste better than do white-shelled eggs. I have purchased both and done the comparison. Nobody in my family could discern any difference in flavor, texture, or quality. the shell color is a function of the breed, i.e. Rhode Island Reds lay brown eggs while Cornish Crosses lay white eggs.

The flavor difference between true range-free chicken eggs, and the standard white chicken egg is dramatic. Due to the varied diet of chickens roaming about, eating bugs, filed mice, various plants, etc., the yolk is richer in both flavor and color, thicker in texture, and probably more nutritious (can't erify that last coment, just an educated guess).

As for omega-3 fatty acids, eat more fish, and add flax-seed to your home-made breads, or sprinkle on your cerial. You'll get all you need.

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
__________________
“No amount of success outside the home can compensate for failure within the home…"

Check out my blog for the friendliest cooking instruction on the net. Go ahead. You know you want to.- http://gwnorthsfamilycookin.wordpress.com/
Chief Longwind Of The North is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-25-2008, 10:41 PM   #24
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Cicero, IL
Posts: 5,093
I once heard that the thickness of the shell was directly influenced by what the chicken was feed, but then someone else said it was actually bred that way for consumers. I did a quick Google but didn't come up with anything...
Maybe there isn't anything to it at all, or it just depends on the type of bird? I would be curious to find out. We once raised chickens, and granted it was along time ago when I was a young kid, but I can't remember them being any tastier or thicker in the shell or anything. I think dad just did it thinking it might be cheaper than buying eggs at the store...
__________________
Maverick2272 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-26-2008, 12:49 AM   #25
Head Chef
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Des Moines Iowa
Posts: 1,214
We raised chickens when I was a kid and my day always!!!! put oyster shell in there feed to improve the thickness of the shell and at the time tasted real good 10yrs =16yrs
__________________
Cook with passion or don't cook at all
Dave Hutchins is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-26-2008, 08:00 AM   #26
Executive Chef
 
justplainbill's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Eastern Long Island, New York
Posts: 4,206
Quote:
Originally Posted by jennyema View Post
How much are they charging for Eggland eggs where you live?

At my store they are $2.49 a dozen for large and the Stop and Shop store brand is $1.89. They are often on sale for less and there are frequently coupons in the Globe which make them cheaper than store brand.

Also, BJ's sells them in 2 dozen packs for pretty darn cheap.

I usually buy Eggland even when they aren't on sale because I think they taste better.

I don't look for them to give me Omega 3, though I do look for calcium in OJ
$2.89 a dozen for large EBs at our local IGA.
__________________
justplainbill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-26-2008, 08:39 AM   #27
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 36
There appear to be hundreds of articles about eggshell thickness available. All seem to imply that a thin eggshell is a bad thing. In wild fowl it means a lower hatching and survival rate, remember the Bald Eagle? That was an eggshell thickness problem related to the use of DDT. When the use of DDT was stopped the Eagle population recovered. The age of the bird has also been linked to eggshell thickness as well as genetic propensities of one bird family vs. another. The color of the Chicken or the egg is not a factor.
If you keep your own hens you are more likely to see that they are fed properly and taken care of than a gigantic egg factory-farm where the cost of feed must be reduced to the minimum so that profit might be achieved from eggs sold for next to nothing at a grocery store. They don't do it because they love chickens, folks, they do it for money. Eggshell thickness needs to be kept at least thick enough to survive the egg handling machinery and the trip to the market. Since the majority of shoppers buy the cheapest possible product the majority of producers are going to recycle bird droppings into the feed and use any waste or animal byproduct they can get their hands on to keep production/feed costs down. I prefer to sidestep that at least a little bit and pay more for eggs from birds that were fed better. If an egg is an egg then wine is wine and there is no reason to buy anything but the cheapest of anything. Admittedly, returns diminish at some point but as a rule you get what you pay for.
My hat is off to you Pacanis for going to the trouble of keeping your own hens, I wish I could get my hands on some of your eggs!
__________________
che'mark is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-26-2008, 08:53 AM   #28
Chef Extraordinaire
 
pacanis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: NW PA
Posts: 18,751
Thanks, che'
My main reason was convenience of always having eggs on hand, but they do taste better..... and no "eggy" aftertaste. I'll never go back to store bought. I wouldn't say I do it because it's cheaper though, not when you figure in the cost of building the coop and having five pullets shipped to me. They'd have to lay a lotta eggs for me to recoup that initial cost. Much like the hunter putting game meat on his table.

But it's kinda neat having chickens anyway. And no trouble at all.
__________________
pacanis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-26-2008, 09:06 AM   #29
Head Chef
 
sparrowgrass's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Highest point in Missouri
Posts: 1,794
Chickens are definitely the easiest livestock I have ever dealt with. As pacanis says, no trouble at all. At least, as long as they stay in the their chicken yard--chickens are **** on the garden, if they get into it.

I have 16 right now. They are getting old (most of them are 5) and I will be ordering 25 new chicks in a couple weeks.

I can supply eggs for half the neighborhood with 25 hens, and the litter is wonderful for my garden. I gather all the leaves I can find in the fall, and fill their chicken yard up with them. By spring, I have tons of lovely compost for free, with no effort on my part.
__________________
I just haven't been the same
since that house fell on my sister.
sparrowgrass is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-26-2008, 09:37 AM   #30
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 36
I've had free range peafowl here for a few years, down to just 2 hens now, and they certainly aren't any trouble. I'm a single guy though and don't use a dozen eggs a week so it might not work out for me to have my own birds. Peahen eggs are big and light brown, about goose egg size.
__________________

__________________
che'mark is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
None

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:56 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.