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Old 05-12-2008, 06:12 AM   #1
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Wink Storing Cheese

Store cheese in your refrigerator, which approximates the
temperature of aging rooms. Keep it wrapped tightly in plastic,
away from air. Air helps mold grow on cheese. If you get a little
mold on the outside, just cut it off. The English say if mold
won't eat your cheddar it can't taste very good.
Bring cheese to room temperature before melting. Melt cheese
over a low heat to help prevent toughening and separation of
oils and liquids.
Most ripened or aged cheese is low in moisture content and
can be frozen without drastic flavor and texture changes. Thaw
slowly in the refrigerator for 24 hours or more. If frozen for
several months, the cheese may dry out somewhat and become
crumbly when thawed.

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Old 05-12-2008, 08:44 AM   #2
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I prefer to store cheese in my stomach
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Old 05-12-2008, 11:39 AM   #3
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Actually you should not wrap cheese tightly in plastic. That encourages mold. Plastic is not good for cheese because it seals the cheese in an air-tight environment, thus not allowing for any gasses or moisture to escape.

Cheese is a living thing, and it's very important for it to breathe.

Much better to wrap cheese in waxed paper or special cheese paper.

Cheese will dry out a bit faster this way, but will retain it's falvor and will discourage mold.
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Old 05-12-2008, 01:35 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jennyema View Post
Actually you should not wrap cheese tightly in plastic. That encourages mold. Plastic is not good for cheese because it seals the cheese in an air-tight environment, thus not allowing for any gasses or moisture to escape.

Cheese is a living thing, and it's very important for it to breathe.

Much better to wrap cheese in waxed paper or special cheese paper.

Cheese will dry out a bit faster this way, but will retain it's falvor and will discourage mold.
Absolutely correct. Short of waxed or butcher paper, parchment will suffice. And, again, loosely wrap it, not tightly.
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Old 05-12-2008, 04:32 PM   #5
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Some people would also say to keep cheese in a larder area rather than the fridge.
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Old 05-12-2008, 05:42 PM   #6
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I have found that I wet down a paper towel, small piece that is, with white vinegar. I drape that over the end of the cheese package that's been opened. I then wrap this in plastic wrap. Put it in the cheese drawer of the fridge. This lasts for a good long time
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Old 05-12-2008, 05:59 PM   #7
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Well I'll be the odd man out here, too.....
Ever since I started keeping cheese in a vacuum bag, I've never had it last so long. No slime, mold, not crumbly.... tastes like it did going in. I don't have a vast array of cheese on hand, so I am only speaking from my experience with extra sharp cheddar, yellow American, Argentino Regganito (or whatever that cheese was, old thread and old cheese by now, too, but I just used some yesterday and it was fine) and pepperjack & Swiss, too, but the last two are usually boughten in smaller quantites and used fairly quickly. I keep them all in the meat drawer in the fridge.
I think it's amazing the way some foods keep better for some than other folks, using totally different methods. It just goes to show you there must be a lot of other variables involved.
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Old 05-12-2008, 06:40 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by meeleend View Post
Store cheese in your refrigerator, which approximates the
temperature of aging rooms. Keep it wrapped tightly in plastic,
away from air. Air helps mold grow on cheese. If you get a little
mold on the outside, just cut it off. The English say if mold
won't eat your cheddar it can't taste very good.
Bring cheese to room temperature before melting. Melt cheese
over a low heat to help prevent toughening and separation of
oils and liquids.
Most ripened or aged cheese is low in moisture content and
can be frozen without drastic flavor and texture changes. Thaw
slowly in the refrigerator for 24 hours or more. If frozen for
several months, the cheese may dry out somewhat and become
crumbly when thawed.

This is nonsense, as some have already pointed out. Parchment paper or in a pinch, foil wrap will suffice. Tightly wrapped cheese in plastic makes it sweat, which induces mold to grow faster.
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Old 05-12-2008, 11:07 PM   #9
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Gosh, you guys. I wish there was a consensus here. I bought a 2 lb loaf of Tillamook extra sharp cheddar cheese today at the new Costco in Puerto Vallarta. I have never seen sharp cheddar cheese here in Mexico, especially Tillamook (I am from Oregon.) I'm afraid to cut into it! It is, of course, encased in wax. Bearing in mind that it is very humid here, should I vacu-seal it after I open it?
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Old 05-12-2008, 11:16 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pacanis View Post
Well I'll be the odd man out here, too.....
Ever since I started keeping cheese in a vacuum bag, I've never had it last so long. No slime, mold, not crumbly.... tastes like it did going in. I don't have a vast array of cheese on hand, so I am only speaking from my experience with extra sharp cheddar, yellow American, Argentino Regganito (or whatever that cheese was, old thread and old cheese by now, too, but I just used some yesterday and it was fine) and pepperjack & Swiss, too, but the last two are usually boughten in smaller quantites and used fairly quickly. I keep them all in the meat drawer in the fridge.
I think it's amazing the way some foods keep better for some than other folks, using totally different methods. It just goes to show you there must be a lot of other variables involved.
I'm kinda with you on this.... I vacuum pack all my cheese, lasts a heck of a lot longer than when I don't. Plus..... why is all the cheese vacuumed packed when a buy it? I can't recall a single wedge of cheese that has not been packaged this way.

Not to say the claims here are not true, maybe I have grown accustomed to cruddy cheese and don't know when I have been exposed to the good stuff!
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