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Old 02-25-2006, 09:00 AM   #21
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Obviously it totally depends on what the dish is.
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Old 02-25-2006, 12:12 PM   #22
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I'm not fond of ripened cheeses such as brie and camembert. But other than that, there is only one cheese that I don't cook with. I save it for munching on all by its lonesome self. And that is Balderson Heritage 5-year aged sharp cheddar. It's too good to cook with. the lesser aged cheddars, and every other cheese available to me is fair game. Oh that I hadd more money than I knew what to do with. I love gruyere, fontina, a good strong swiss, ementellar, gouda, muenster, feta, chedda, colby, parmesano regiano, asiago, cottage cheese, ricotta, monterey jack, romano, and most others you can think of. And I cook with all of them, when I have a bit of extra cash.

I understand from speaking with my eldest son that there are some incredible cheeses avialble on-line, and at very reasonable prices. I'm going to do a bit of research and try some Spanish, and South American Cheeses. I know the Danish have excellent cheeses as well. I just don't have enough variety in my "end of the world" location here in Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan. I NEED MORE CHEESE!

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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Old 02-25-2006, 01:57 PM   #23
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Two kinds of fontina--very very different cheeses

Italian fontina is a tangy semi-soft cheese--bold flavor. Danish fontina is mild semi-soft, not as flavorful.
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Old 02-26-2006, 10:46 PM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gretchen
Italian fontina is a tangy semi-soft cheese--bold flavor. Danish fontina is mild semi-soft, not as flavorful.
The Italian fontina is the only type I've had, and I love it. I believe that Havarti is the only Danish cheese I've had, and I love it as well.

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Old 03-02-2006, 10:43 AM   #25
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Where to start?

Cheddar (sharp), mozz, mon jack, colby, muenster, parm reg, pecorino, gouda, swiss, gruyere, edam and good ole processed velveeta.

I'm sure I left some out... oh well.
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Old 03-02-2006, 11:17 PM   #26
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Originally Posted by ronjohn55
heck, we'll even use Velveta on occasion...

John
Ah John- that's not cheese its a mixture of a lot of chemicals held together with a heaping handful of Elmer's. But as long as you brought it up here's a recipe for that stuff and beer.
Take some bacon and brown it in a dutch oven.
Take a block of Velveeta and dump it in on top of the bacon and of course the grease.
Take three cans of Miller High Life beer, two at room temperature and one ice cold. Stir in the two cans of room temperature beer.
Open the ice cold beer and drink while stirring the soup. Soup will be done about the time the beer is finished.
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Old 03-03-2006, 08:23 AM   #27
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Sounds good to me!

How does the saying go? Any recipe that starts with, "Open 3 beers..."
Wonder how it would taste with a pale ale? Hmm....

John
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Old 03-03-2006, 08:28 AM   #28
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Originally Posted by ronjohn55
Wonder how it would taste with a pale ale? Hmm....

John
Or stout. That might be too strong, but maybe one of the beers could be a stout. If it has to be the third one then that is ok with me
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Old 03-03-2006, 08:43 AM   #29
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Chedder and velveeta and anyother cheese that is on sale.
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Old 03-03-2006, 09:45 AM   #30
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Originally Posted by GB
Or stout. That might be too strong, but maybe one of the beers could be a stout. If it has to be the third one then that is ok with me
LOL!

I thought of that too, GB!! Stouts would definitely give it an altogether different flavor. I think the cheez could stand up to it though, so I think all three beers could be stouts, without it being too strong. That's the beauty of a recipe like this, you can change the flavors of the dish by changing the beers!


John
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