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Old 02-06-2013, 01:15 PM   #1
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Question Black Tea?

When somebody says Black Tea, what comes to your mind? In the last couple of weeks, three different times, three different places I was asked if I would like tea or coffee.
-Tea please, was my answer.
-What kind of tea would you like, Sir?
-Plain Black Tea would be great.
All three times I got a dumb stair: What do you mean Black Tea?
Well, to me Black Tea is any black tea, English Breakfast tea is black, Earl Grey is black, plain old Lipton tea in the big yellow box is black, Red Rose is black, there are numerous no-name brands you get in school or work cafeterias that are plain black teas. Pretty much anything that is not fruit or berry flavored teas, or not green teas are in fact black teas.

So, I ask you, what comes to your mind if you hear those two words: Black Tea.

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Old 02-06-2013, 01:31 PM   #2
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To me, black tea is as you described, Charlie. However, most people don't know it as "black tea". If you want Lipton or Red Rose or noname, it is usually referred to as "Orange Pekoe" (which is a type of black tea as are "Earl Grey" and "English Breakfast").

It is kind of ironic that the tea most people have drunk all their lives is not a common name, yet they will know "green tea", "red tea" (rooibos), "herbal tea, etc.

Good topic, gives me something to think about over my cup of Vanilla Rooibos!
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Old 02-06-2013, 01:53 PM   #3
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In the south they look at you like that if you even order hot tea. It is becoming slightly more prevalent since I moved here in 1996, but around here if you say "tea" it means iced tea.
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Old 02-06-2013, 02:18 PM   #4
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Yes black tea means just as you have said Charlie . I don't come across many who drink just black tea but I would know what it meant .

I do love a cup of tea, milk in mine please .
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Old 02-06-2013, 02:27 PM   #5
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Here is Boston, if you want coffee you just say 'regular.' If it is to go you say, 'large regular.' You don't even use the word 'coffee.' Regular means with milk and sugar. I always get a large light with extra sugar.

If you want tea, they will bring you a cup of hot water with a tea bag on the saucer or a small tea pot with hot water and the tea bag on the saucer. The milk is in a little pitcher on the side. Sugar is on the table. If to go, you say, "tea with milk and sugar.' They put the tea bag in the hot water with the milk and sugar. You know enough to wait for it to steep before you open it. If you want ice tea, you have to ask for ice tea. It comes without sugar or milk. You have to ask for that separately.
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Old 02-06-2013, 02:28 PM   #6
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I am the same GQ, just milk, no sugar
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Old 02-06-2013, 02:32 PM   #7
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Barbara -- and five will get you ten it's Sweet tea


Charlie, I'm a tea drinker too. And coffee. and water and and...

If you order black tea, I would understand it most likely to mean Lipton. Or whatever brand they have that is similar. If you just order Tea or Hot Tea, you would get the same, without them questioning what is black tea. In US, it's coffee, no one questions if you order Black coffee. I think we just don't serve as much tea, so it's unfamilar territory.

At most Chinese restaurants, you get whatever one they choose to have. Or green. or Iced. Perhaps at an upscale Chinese restaurnnt they specify Oolong, Jasmine, Chrysanthemum etc and have choices.

Also Black tea to me means No milk. I am not sure we put milk / cream in tea in the US to the extent they do elsw-where, more often a slice of lemon/ or lots of people use a sweetener. You have to drag that slice of lemon out of them with hot tea at a restaurant. And they probably secretly roll their eyes behind your back if you asked for tea and honey. Just go with it make it your own way at home.

At some hotel restaurants I have been offered choices, esp Earl grey and they have presentation "boxes" to choose a flavor, make a big deal about it and include a few herbal teas in there too. Both Twinings and Stash tea have variety boxes the hotels use. But it's rare that I stay at a hotel, so this may not count in the regular everyday world of the tea drinker.
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Old 02-06-2013, 02:40 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiskadoodle View Post
Barbara -- and five will get you ten it's Sweet tea ...
I was just thinking that I should have added that to what I wrote! It took James the longest time to learn how to order "unsweet tea!" He kept saying "regular" and of course regular here meant sweet!

I love sweet Luzianne iced tea, but in the winter I do love a nice spiced hot tea (any black variety) or green tea. Occasionally I like a nice herbal tea as well.

I agree with Charlie's definition of black tea as well.
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Old 02-06-2013, 03:06 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Barbara L View Post
I was just thinking that I should have added that to what I wrote! It took James the longest time to learn how to order "unsweet tea!" He kept saying "regular" and of course regular here meant sweet!

I love sweet Luzianne iced tea, but in the winter I do love a nice spiced hot tea (any black variety) or green tea. Occasionally I like a nice herbal tea as well.

I agree with Charlie's definition of black tea as well.
--
I have heard Luzianne makes itself into a good ice tea. I have also heard Walmart carries it, but have not seen it in local walmart.

I think my favorite all purpose black tea, hot or cold, is Bigelow's Constant Comment. A little hint of cinnamon and orange.
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Old 02-06-2013, 03:48 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by Gravy Queen View Post
... I do love a cup of tea, milk in mine please .
ah, tht is my morning favorite with some sugar. during the day after lunch or dinner, plain black, no sugar, no milk.

P.S. Unless the meal was dairy.
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