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Old 11-22-2014, 10:18 AM   #251
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I add onion, carrots, thyme, parsley and black peppercorns to my turkey and chicken stock. It's already made
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Old 12-19-2014, 12:15 PM   #252
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Chief's Tip of the Day

After catching fresh fish of any kind, clean it as soon as possible. Cook it as soon as possible by whatever recipe and technique you like. If you can't cook it right away, or want to store some up for winter, purchase some liquid drink in 1 quart waxed paper cartons, the way you used to get milk in the 60's and 70's. Fill the carton with fish until it's nearly full. Fill with clean, fresh water, making sure that no fish is exposed to the air. Freeze upright into solid blocks. Lay the cartons down to stack.

Alternately, fill strong, zipper-freezer bags with fish and water. Remove all air when sealing. Freeze.

We ate great trout in the middle of January that had been frozen in water in July, and they tasted as good as the day they were caught.

Seeeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 12-19-2014, 12:19 PM   #253
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Chief, that's the way my dad always froze our walleye, in milk cartons. Tasted fresh for months.
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Old 12-19-2014, 02:05 PM   #254
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Originally Posted by Dawgluver View Post
Chief, that's the way my dad always froze our walleye, in milk cartons. Tasted fresh for months.
That's how we froze walleye as well as duck and partridge.
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Old 05-04-2015, 08:13 PM   #255
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Haven't given a daily tip in a while so I guess I need to put on my thinking cap and come up with something. Ah, I've got it.

If you ever overcook poultry so that it's dry and tasteless, save the pan juices, including the fat. Add a bit of liquid smoke, and broth from the same kind of bird. Cut up the bird into pieces and place into the liquid. Place all in the fridge and let sit overnight. The meat will re-hydrate and can be as tender and juicy as if the bird were cooked perfectly the first time. Reheat until just hot, and serve with sides.

I know this works as I saved a barbecued turkey that way, with juices from the drip pan. People told me it was some of the juciest, most tender turkey they'd ever had. I didn't tell them that the night before it was dry and tough, like cardboard.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 05-04-2015, 11:57 PM   #256
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At least once a day, tell your children and spouse, along with others you love, that you love them. I close all my phone calls to my kids and other family members with an "I love you." When I am saying goodbye to them at the door, I also say it then. By saying these three simple words, you will never have to live with the "Ifonlies". If only I had told her/him I love you. And now I will never have the chance.

You don't have to be gushy about it. It could be said in return for something nice they did for you. Like pour you a cup of coffee. "Thank you. No wonder I love you. You always do nice things for me." A quick expression of love and appreciation. That is all it takes.
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Old 05-05-2015, 01:48 AM   #257
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chief Longwind Of The North View Post
...If you ever overcook poultry so that it's dry and tasteless, save the pan juices, including the fat. Add a bit of liquid smoke, and broth from the same kind of bird. Cut up the bird into pieces and place into the liquid. Place all in the fridge and let sit overnight. The meat will re-hydrate and can be as tender and juicy as if the bird were cooked perfectly the first time. Reheat until just hot, and serve with sides...
You don't even need to ruin your meat to use this tip. My Mom used to work for a caterer. Tony's roast beef was the juiciest, most tender eye of round you could ever have. He would start three days before the event by marinating the meat overnight in a wine marinade. The next day he would roast it, chill it, slice it, and layer it in large baking pans with the pan juices. The next day (day 3) was the event. He would take those pans out of the walk-in, let them come up to room temp, and then replace the plastic wrap with foil and warm gently in a low oven. To. Die. For. We always were happy to see Mom come home with some of the leftovers, but we especially like his roast beef.
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Old 06-09-2015, 05:18 PM   #258
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Chief's Tip of the Day:

When baking a cheesecake, check the cheesecake about seven or eight minutes before the recommended cooking time for your recipe. Slightly jiggle the pan and watch how the filling reacts. It should wiggle slightly, like geletin that has set. Then turn off the heat and let the cheesecake cool with the oven, with the door slightly opened. This will help prevent the cheesecake from cracking.

For a more firm cheesecake, cook until the custard is firm, then allow to cool with the oven.

If you want to get fancy, line your springform pan with parchment paper, and omit the crust. Add the filling and bake for a firm custard. Remove the pan sides and let cool. slide a thin, plastic cutting sheet under the cooked custard and remove it in one piece by sliding the cutting sheet onto a flat surface. Now, put the side back on the pan and make a thin graham cracker crust on the bottom and sides. Chill for 15 minutes in your freezer. Fill the crust with s hidden layer fo something great. Finally, lift the custard and gently slide it back into the crust. you will find that it shrank just enough to fit into the crust perfectly as it cooked. your guests or family will wonder how you got that great filling underneath your fabulous cheescake. Take a bow and say thank you to them.

As with all of my tips, I know this works because I did it.

Seeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 06-25-2015, 10:39 AM   #259
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I have been house sitting for a friend (who has satellite TV--you know I've been staying up way too late watching the food channel and another one, Gusto). I learned a cool trick re: how to seed tomatoes. Cut the top and bottom off (just like when doing a bell pepper), make a slit down the fleshy side (not the seed packet/pulp portion), open it up, and use a spoon to scope out the pulp and seed. It works like a charm, is not messy, and if only doing a few tomatoes, is a lot easier than squeezing the seeds and pulp out over a bowl. I just ate the pulp and seeds off the spoon, but you could do something else with them. I didn't want the bitterness the seeds can add or the liquid the pulp adds in the dish I was making. I didn't mind the skin (although, I don't like that in salsa or tomato sauce). I usually skin the tomatoes and then seed them when making either one of those. Now I have a faster way to seed them when I want to dice or chop them for sauce or salsa. The chickens love the pulp and seeds...and skins.
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Old 06-25-2015, 12:04 PM   #260
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CWS4322 View Post
I have been house sitting for a friend (who has satellite TV--you know I've been staying up way too late watching the food channel and another one, Gusto). I learned a cool trick re: how to seed tomatoes. Cut the top and bottom off (just like when doing a bell pepper), make a slit down the fleshy side (not the seed packet/pulp portion), open it up, and use a spoon to scope out the pulp and seed. It works like a charm, is not messy, and if only doing a few tomatoes, is a lot easier than squeezing the seeds and pulp out over a bowl. I just ate the pulp and seeds off the spoon, but you could do something else with them. I didn't want the bitterness the seeds can add or the liquid the pulp adds in the dish I was making. I didn't mind the skin (although, I don't like that in salsa or tomato sauce). I usually skin the tomatoes and then seed them when making either one of those. Now I have a faster way to seed them when I want to dice or chop them for sauce or salsa. The chickens love the pulp and seeds...and skins.
I can't quite visual the process. I understand the part about cutting the top and bottom off the tomato, but I'm lost after that.
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