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Old 11-11-2007, 11:20 PM   #21
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unka bob, hairy vetch is great stuff. it's so hardy it's even recommended in my zone, and a zone north of me.

it not only adds to the soil when turned in, but is a nitrogen fixing plant as it is growing.
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Old 11-12-2007, 04:48 PM   #22
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When my father-in-law talked about harvesting corn, he said all the kids would go out to pick, and there was a "bang board" on one side of the wagon. If you tossed your corn up to hit that board, it bounced back into the wagon, instead of going over the wagon.

My mom talks about "stomping" hay--her brothers forked it up into the wagon, and she and her sisters tromped it down so the wagon would hold more. There was a rope that went thru pulleys high in the barn, and a net attached to one end. When they hauled the hay to the barn, they forked it onto the net, and a horse pulled it up into the loft.

Once my mother got her clothes caught on the hook that held the net, and she was almost dragged up into the barn.

Modern farming methods were just getting started in the thirties--farm programs to stop erosion, crop rotation, soil and water conservation districts, University Extension, even 4-H clubs so boys could learn good crop practices.
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Old 11-12-2007, 05:59 PM   #23
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That's great information, Sparrowgrass. Thank you very much.

Do you happen to know what they used for straw?
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Old 11-12-2007, 08:51 PM   #24
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I know nothing about those days but I would venture all farms were run by the decendants of different countries so you might have Germans,Swiss,Italians,Russians etc that ran their farms as their parents taught them.Eventually their methods and recipes etc would meld together.Some had to be better milk producers and cheese makers as others would be great butchers,sausage makers etc and others were may be better wheat growers,bread makers and so on.So Im guessing alot of of them bartered alot.As they probably needed also needed iron smiths and a host of others,that had talents that were important to survival.Im thinking beer makers and so on.Im sure actual cash was slim so there had to be alot of trading going on.
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Old 11-12-2007, 09:03 PM   #25
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I know nothing about those days but I would venture all farms were run by the decendants of different countries so you might have Germans,Swiss,Italians,Russians etc that ran their farms as their parents taught them.Eventually their methods and recipes etc would meld together.Some had to be better milk producers and cheese makers as others would be great butchers,sausage makers etc and others were may be better wheat growers,bread makers and so on.So Im guessing alot of of them bartered alot.As they probably needed also needed iron smiths and a host of others,that had talents that were important to survival.Im thinking beer makers and so on.Im sure actual cash was slim so there had to be alot of trading going on.
There was a lot of bartering going on. I think the old country doctor got more chickens, loaves of homemade bred, etc, than he knew what to do with.
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Old 11-12-2007, 09:09 PM   #26
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There was a lot of bartering going on. I think the old country doctor got more chickens, loaves of homemade bred, etc, than he knew what to do with.
Little off topic, but a bit relevant.

I was a child in the late '40s and early '50s. My daddy was a country doctor and we ate quite well because he was frequently paid by "food." It wasn't unusual for him to get in his car at the end of office hours to find the back seat filled with sweet potatoes, white potatoes, etc. He was paid in fresh eggs, homemade jams/preserves, fresh-killed beef, hogs and chickens. There were also country hams, fresh corn, beans, peas, etc. You name it, it was offered in payment for his services.

Man, oh man, we ate well!!!!
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Old 11-12-2007, 09:17 PM   #27
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Little off topic, but a bit relevant.

I was a child in the late '40s and early '50s. My daddy was a country doctor and we ate quite well because he was frequently paid by "food." It wasn't unusual for him to get in his car at the end of office hours to find the back seat filled with sweet potatoes, white potatoes, etc. He was paid in fresh eggs, homemade jams/preserves, fresh-killed beef, hogs and chickens. There were also country hams, fresh corn, beans, peas, etc. You name it, it was offered in payment for his services.

Man, oh man, we ate well!!!!
Im betting what he got was worth far more than his fee.I admire the folks that tried to pay in some way.
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Old 11-12-2007, 09:21 PM   #28
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Im betting what he got was worth far more than his fee.I admire the folks that tried to pay in some way.
You're absolutely right, Jackie. Everyone seemed to love "Doc" and it showed in how they made an effort to pay him. This was/is a very rural, almost poor area.



Now...back to our regularly scheduled program.
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Old 11-12-2007, 09:52 PM   #29
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You're absolutely right, Jackie. Everyone seemed to love "Doc" and it showed in how they made an effort to pay him. This was/is a very rural, almost poor area.



Now...back to our regularly scheduled program.
I would love to read a book on country doctors Im sure they never got rich as doctors do today.I think they truly wanted to help in those days and sacrificed alot to do it.God bless them all.
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Old 11-12-2007, 10:44 PM   #30
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Miss Connie...

I thought you might find this interesting...Especially the price of Corn, pork, and beef.

Great Depression in Ames
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