"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > The Back Porch > Off Topic Discussions
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 08-19-2012, 11:13 PM   #241
Chef Extraordinaire
 
taxlady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: near Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Posts: 18,884
Send a message via Skype™ to taxlady
What a great story PF.
__________________

__________________
May you live as long as you wish and love as long as you live.
Robert A. Heinlein
taxlady is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-20-2012, 01:52 AM   #242
Chef Extraordinaire
 
CWS4322's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Rural Ottawa, Ontario
Posts: 12,318
Quote:
Originally Posted by PrincessFiona60 View Post
This was in my e-mail this morning:

In 2003, police in Warwickshire , England, opened a garden shed and found a whimpering, cowering dog. The dog had been locked in the shed and abandoned. It was dirty and malnourished, and had quite clearly been abused.


In an act of kindness, the police took the dog, which was a female greyhound, to the Nuneaton Warwickshire Wildlife Sanctuary, which is run by a man named Geoff Grewcock, and known as a haven for animals abandoned, orphaned, or otherwise in need.


Geoff and the other sanctuary staff went to work with two aims: to restore the dog to full health, and to win her trust. It took several weeks, but eventually both goals were achieved. They named her Jasmine, and they started to think about finding her an adoptive home.







Jasmine, however, had other ideas. No one quite remembers how it came about, but Jasmine started welcoming all animal arrivals at the sanctuary. It would not matter if it were a puppy, a fox cub, a rabbit or, any other lost or hurting animal. Jasmine would just peer into the box or cage and, when and where possible, deliver a welcoming lick.


Geoff relates one of the early incidents. "We had two puppies that had been abandoned by a nearby railway line. One was a Lakeland Terrier cross and another was a Jack Russell Doberman cross. They were tiny when they arrived at the center, and Jasmine approached them and grabbed one by the scruff of the neck in her mouth and put him on the settee. Then she fetched the other one and sat down with them, cuddling them."


"But she is like that with all of our animals, even the rabbits. She takes all the stress out of them, and it helps them to not only feel close to her, but to settle into their new surroundings. She has done the same with the fox and badger cubs, she licks the rabbits and guinea pigs, and even lets the birds perch on the bridge of her nose."


Jasmine, the timid, abused, deserted waif, became the animal sanctuary's resident surrogate mother, a role for which she might have been born. The list of orphaned and abandoned youngsters she has cared for comprises five fox cubs, four badger cubs, fifteen chicks, eight guinea pigs, two stray puppies and fifteen rabbits - and one roe deer fawn. Tiny Bramble, eleven weeks old, was found semi-conscious in a field. Upon arrival at the sanctuary, Jasmine cuddled up to her to keep her warm, and then went into the full foster-mum role. Jasmine the greyhound showers Bramble the roe deer with affection, and makes sure nothing is matted.



"They are inseparable," says Geoff. "Bramble walks between her legs, and they keep kissing each other. They walk together round the sanctuary. It's a real treat to see them."



Jasmine will continue to care for Bramble until she is old enough to be returned to woodland life. When that happens, Jasmine will not be lonely. She will be too busy showering love and affection on the next orphan or victim of abuse.



Pictured from the left are: "Toby," a stray Lakeland dog; "Bramble," orphaned roe deer; "Buster," a stray Jack Russell; a dumped rabbit; "Sky," an injured barn owl; and "Jasmine," with a mother's heart doing best what a caring mother would do...

Please pass this along, and maybe make someone else's day just a little brighter!
+10
__________________

__________________
I've got OCD--Obsessive Chicken Disorder!
http://www.discusscooking.com/forums...les-76125.html
CWS4322 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-20-2012, 02:37 AM   #243
Executive Chef
 
Whiskadoodle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Twin Cities Mn
Posts: 2,954
Nice story and pics PF. Our neighborhood has quite a few greyhound rescues/ retired racing dogs. Can't figure where they all come from because the closest dog-track has been closed for serveral years. There is a local greyhound specialty rescue org so they may have them brought in from various places. There's one that's 3 legged and gets around the n'hood pretty good too.
__________________
Whiskadoodle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-20-2012, 03:36 AM   #244
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Kylie1969's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Australia
Posts: 13,936
That was a great read, thanks Fiona
__________________
All I really need is love, but a little chocolate now and then doesn't hurt
Kylie1969 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-20-2012, 06:38 AM   #245
Chef Extraordinaire
 
CWS4322's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Rural Ottawa, Ontario
Posts: 12,318
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiskadoodle View Post
Nice story and pics PF. Our neighborhood has quite a few greyhound rescues/ retired racing dogs. Can't figure where they all come from because the closest dog-track has been closed for serveral years. There is a local greyhound specialty rescue org so they may have them brought in from various places. There's one that's 3 legged and gets around the n'hood pretty good too.
There are a number of rescue orgs throughout the US and Canada that get the retired dogs (I think they are usually 3-5 years of age) from the tracks in FL and other states that have dog racing. Rehabilitated/rescued greyhounds have made a very important contribution to canine health, thanks also to Dr. Jean Dodds (founder of Hemopet--link below).

Home

Adopting a rescued greyhound is a wonderful thing to do. They do tend to make good pets--but require a fenced yard (the only place they should ever be off leash), a martingale collar (because of the narrow head), coats in the winter if in cold climates, and, contrary to popular belief, are not hyper--they tend to be couch potatoes. So they enjoy having a couch of their own.
__________________
I've got OCD--Obsessive Chicken Disorder!
http://www.discusscooking.com/forums...les-76125.html
CWS4322 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-20-2012, 07:29 AM   #246
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Addie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: East Boston, MA
Posts: 19,045
Not too far from where I live was the Wonderland Dog Track for Greyhound Racing. Our citizens voted to end greyhound racing in the State. As a result, hundreds of folks were put out of work and a very large number of dogs no longer had a home. A lot of the dogs lived at the track. When it came the day to close the track, the owners had to make a choice. Find a home for the dogs or put them down. A lot of the dogs found a home right here in Eastie. They make great running companions for those into jogging. They are such gentle loving animals. Everytime I see one, I stop, let them smell me and then I pat them. I realize I am interuppting the joggers pace, but I don't care. I can't help myself. I also make it a point to ask if the dog is a rescue. The answer is alway yes. I make it a point to thank the owner.
__________________
Illegitimi non carborundum!
I don't want my last words to be, "I wish I had spent more time doing housework"
Addie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-20-2012, 09:16 AM   #247
Chef Extraordinaire
 
CWS4322's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Rural Ottawa, Ontario
Posts: 12,318
Quote:
Originally Posted by Addie View Post
. Everytime I see one, I stop, let them smell me and then I pat them. I realize I am interuppting the joggers pace, but I don't care. I can't help myself. I also make it a point to ask if the dog is a rescue. The answer is alway yes. I make it a point to thank the owner.
+1

Adopting a rescued animal--whether it be a dog, chicken (yes, there are rescue orgs for battery farm chickens), cat, parrot, horse, goat, sheep, etc. is a wonderful act of showing one's humanity.
__________________
I've got OCD--Obsessive Chicken Disorder!
http://www.discusscooking.com/forums...les-76125.html
CWS4322 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-27-2012, 05:33 AM   #248
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Galena, IL
Posts: 7,973
Quote:
Originally Posted by Addie View Post
Not too far from where I live was the Wonderland Dog Track for Greyhound Racing. Our citizens voted to end greyhound racing in the State. As a result, hundreds of folks were put out of work and a very large number of dogs no longer had a home. A lot of the dogs lived at the track. When it came the day to close the track, the owners had to make a choice. Find a home for the dogs or put them down. A lot of the dogs found a home right here in Eastie. They make great running companions for those into jogging. They are such gentle loving animals. Everytime I see one, I stop, let them smell me and then I pat them. I realize I am interuppting the joggers pace, but I don't care. I can't help myself. I also make it a point to ask if the dog is a rescue. The answer is alway yes. I make it a point to thank the owner.
Ironically, retired greyhounds actually are used to living in kennels. yes, they need to run, but also (I'm told, I lived in Florida where there were a lot of retired hounds; there was an adoption center at the race course) can be good pets for smaller areas, as long as you take them out and let them run. Some vets kept them as "house pets" to use for blood donations when needed. This sounds cruel but isn't, these doggies were much beloved. They were just used to being tested for doping, so didn't think much of giving blood. I prefer a smaller dog, but if I wanted a larger one, I'd think of a retired greyhound.
__________________
Claire is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-27-2012, 05:40 AM   #249
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Galena, IL
Posts: 7,973
My doggie, Rosebud, is a rescue (some of you have helped me with her). One of the things that continually surprises me (my previous pets I've had straight from the litter) is that she says "thank you" after being fed. Our other dogs and cats were nonchalant about their food. It was something that was always going to be there. Rosebud jumps up at the mention of "dinner", and gobbles it down. Husband feeds her (something we learned to do when she was showing aggressive tendencies towards him) when he gets up (at 8 a.m.) and at again around 3-4 p.m. She always jumps up and eats, then comes to each of us to say thank-you. It is just funny. Maybe I'm giving her human charactoristics (cannot remember the word for it), but she gobbles down her kibble, then walks up to each of us and says thank-you (sometimes this entails a burp, but always a cuddle). then she moves on to do her other doggie things.
__________________
Claire is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-27-2012, 07:10 AM   #250
Chef Extraordinaire
 
CWS4322's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Rural Ottawa, Ontario
Posts: 12,318
Anthropomorphism/anthropomorphic traits are the terms you seek.

Anthropomorphism - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
__________________

__________________
I've got OCD--Obsessive Chicken Disorder!
http://www.discusscooking.com/forums...les-76125.html
CWS4322 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:00 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.