"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > The Back Porch > Off Topic Discussions
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 08-05-2011, 11:21 AM   #1
Master Chef
 
Snip 13's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Brakpan, South Africa
Posts: 5,431
South African Lingo! Eish Lol!

Just because we speak English doesn't mean you'll understand us. Since so many of you don't always know what I'm on about. Here's a link to read a bit about SA English. Funny and true!
Enjoy!
South African English is lekker! - SouthAfrica.info

__________________

__________________
Odette
"I used to jog but the ice cubes kept falling out of my glass."

"I hear voices and they don't like you "
Snip 13 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-05-2011, 06:52 PM   #2
Chef Extraordinaire
 
babetoo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: escondido, calif. near san diego
Posts: 14,349
very interesting. isn't language a marvel?
__________________

__________________
"life isn't about how to survive the storm but how to dance in the rain"
babetoo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-05-2011, 08:49 PM   #3
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Mostly in my head
Posts: 2,665
Cool! Thanks for the link. For the record, there are places in the U.S. where even though they're speaking english you're not necessarily going to know what they're saying. It's funny how the same language can branch of and incorporate language from various regions and local areas to become something different. And from what I understand, it's not just english that does this. When I was taking spanish at university the instructor pointed out that words for some things changed depending on the country, or sometimes even the region of the country. She said there were also terms/slang that were particular to various regions. And in the business communications class that I took the instructor, who had a lot of experience in global business and global business communications, warned us to be careful when using slang/colloquialisms regardless of what language we were using because they vary so much from one region to another.

I find language in general absolutely fascinating. It's construction can actually be explained through mathematical concepts but it's so influenced by culture, environment, art and even technological and scientific expansion. It's a complete marvel to me.
__________________
Just because something has a duck bill doesn't mean it's a platypus. It might just be a duck.
Roger Miller: You can't roller skate in a buffalo heard, but you can be happy if you've a mind to.
purple.alien.giraffe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-07-2011, 07:46 AM   #4
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Galena, IL
Posts: 7,973
I haven't looked this up yet, but definitely will. I have a blind friend who, like me, loves etymology. There's a great book called The Story of English that is wonderful on this subject! My husband said that when he had a platoon in Vietnam, some of his soldiers insisted it was pop, others insisted it was soda. I just laughed and said he had no New Englanders, because they used to call it tonic. He said he had to do something, they were literally coming to blows about it. So he declared that it was soda-pop, period. Both words, every time.

One time we were having drinks with friends, and someone said, "oh, don't pay it is XXX's shout." Huh? Since then I've known many Aussies and Brits, but at the time I didn't have a clue.

I read a lot of British, Scottish novels so can keep up to a degree. Are there any great, no make that fun, South African novelists? I'll move over to the book lline and re-post that question.
__________________
Claire is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-07-2011, 07:54 AM   #5
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Uncle Bob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Small Town Mississippi
Posts: 17,392
Love Windgat.....In my South known as a "Smoke Blower"
__________________
There is only one Quality worse than Hardness of Heart, and that is Softness of Head.

Kool-Aid...Think Before You Drink
Uncle Bob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-07-2011, 08:00 AM   #6
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Galena, IL
Posts: 7,973
Oh, how fun. I just looked it up and will print it to read to my friend. She'll get a laugh from all the English words she doesn't know. One time I was in Hong Kong and got a weird call. It was a mistaken wake up call, and the caller was speaking English .... or at least he thought he was. I'm generally good at accents, being raised in the military, but I swear, not one word he said made sense to me. When I finally realized that he'd gotten the wrong hotel room for a wake-up call, the poor man who needed it probably missed flight. English has many forms and you need to realize that when you travel.
__________________
Claire is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-07-2011, 12:28 PM   #7
Master Chef
 
Snip 13's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Brakpan, South Africa
Posts: 5,431
It's good hey? Or shall I say bakgat! lol!
__________________
Odette
"I used to jog but the ice cubes kept falling out of my glass."

"I hear voices and they don't like you "
Snip 13 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-07-2011, 12:41 PM   #8
Master Chef
 
Snip 13's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Brakpan, South Africa
Posts: 5,431
Quote:
Originally Posted by Claire View Post
I haven't looked this up yet, but definitely will. I have a blind friend who, like me, loves etymology. There's a great book called The Story of English that is wonderful on this subject! My husband said that when he had a platoon in Vietnam, some of his soldiers insisted it was pop, others insisted it was soda. I just laughed and said he had no New Englanders, because they used to call it tonic. He said he had to do something, they were literally coming to blows about it. So he declared that it was soda-pop, period. Both words, every time.

One time we were having drinks with friends, and someone said, "oh, don't pay it is XXX's shout." Huh? Since then I've known many Aussies and Brits, but at the time I didn't have a clue.

I read a lot of British, Scottish novels so can keep up to a degree. Are there any great, no make that fun, South African novelists? I'll move over to the book lline and re-post that question.
I would either read the Joke Book "Lekker Thick by Leon Schuster" or watch some of his movies. The best way to understand more about South African ways!
He's really funny!
__________________

__________________
Odette
"I used to jog but the ice cubes kept falling out of my glass."

"I hear voices and they don't like you "
Snip 13 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:48 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.