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Old 06-24-2007, 07:00 AM   #1
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Red face Does anyone know what Veal La Sous is?

I am not sure I have the spelling correctly so please forgive me! I have relatives who are French and this is on the menu for today. They gave me the option to request "another" dish if I wasn't comfortable with this one.

I said, No that sounds good. Veal is good!

Then I noticed the hubby giggling at my response...

So my question is:

Does anyone know what Veal La Sous (sp?) is?

MommyDoThis

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Old 06-24-2007, 08:03 AM   #2
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Sorry, I Googled and got no place.

Am sure someone will be here soon to help.

But here we decide on the menu. You come to our house you get what we are serving. We do our best to accomodate, believe me.

But for someone to say that if the dish they requested makes me uncomfortable I could opt for another, I would take umbrage.

They would get franks and beans.

Sorry. Just feel a bit peckish today.
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Old 06-24-2007, 10:34 AM   #3
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Mommy, as far as I've been able to determine, it is a veal dish that includes mushrooms. I Googled "veau au sous" and, with translations, came up with my conclusion.

My French isn't as good as it used to be, but there's bound to be a member here who speaks/reads fluent French and will be able to help you.

I think it will be delicious no matter what. I love veal prepared just about any way.
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Old 06-25-2007, 09:45 AM   #4
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hmmmm, 'souse' means to pickle or brined. Or, it could be a ground veal such as used in a luncheon meat bound with a brine-based gelatin mixture??
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Old 06-25-2007, 02:27 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cjs
hmmmm, 'souse' means to pickle or brined. Or, it could be a ground veal such as used in a luncheon meat bound with a brine-based gelatin mixture??
Boy, I hope not - what a way to waste a nice piece of veal!
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Old 06-25-2007, 05:40 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cjs
hmmmm, 'souse' means to pickle or brined. Or, it could be a ground veal such as used in a luncheon meat bound with a brine-based gelatin mixture??
You are correct with your description of "souse," but sous is a French word which means "beneath" or "under. I don't think the veal is pickled or brined. As I said earlier, my French is not as good as it used to be.
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Old 06-25-2007, 06:14 PM   #7
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it sounds like sous vide
a technique i use at work for my lamb
what i have is lamb shoulder
i prepare it "confit" but rather than cook it in its own fat, it is in an airtight bag with all the seasonings and the air removed
then it is cooked for 24 hour hours at 65-67C about 160-167F
it is moist and succulent and very flavourful
the technique works for lesser cuts of beef, pork, lamb, game, even dark meat chicken and some fish like monkfish
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Old 06-25-2007, 06:55 PM   #8
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I "could" say that it's made from the parts of young calves chained inside tiny cages in order to prevent their moving around & thus turning their muscular/meat structure from snowy white to pink (thus reducing their price).

But I won't.
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Old 06-26-2007, 09:36 AM   #9
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"of "souse," but sous is a French word which means "beneath" or "under."

and in cooking, that is what brining means - beneath or under.
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Old 06-26-2007, 10:26 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BreezyCooking
I "could" say that it's made from the parts of young calves chained inside tiny cages in order to prevent their moving around & thus turning their muscular/meat structure from snowy white to pink (thus reducing their price).

But I won't.

Thank you for demonstrating restraint. No sense beating a dead 'horse'.
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