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Old 09-17-2006, 08:59 PM   #11
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cliveb - I don't think your recipe would work in a crock pot OR a pressure cooker. There would be too much moisture produced in either one. A pressure cooker cooks with steam - a crock pot cooks with moisture. Anything with a top of pastry dough just wouldn't work. The way you describe this dish as being cooked it would most definately be a dry heat.

Right? Or did I miss something. If I did miss something be gentle with me!
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Old 09-18-2006, 06:41 AM   #12
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Good morning Kitchenelf
I think if you re-read Clive's post, he was not talking about a pressure cooker as you and I know it, but using a normal pan sealing the lit with pastry (to stop the steam from escaping and acting as a low pressure cooker) and piling hot coals on top. The pastry is then thrown away.
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Old 09-18-2006, 10:58 AM   #13
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Thanks for being so gentle Romany!!! lol

I read it as though he were asking someone to try his recipe in a pressure cooker and a slow cooker to compare it. I think what he meant was a recipe of their choice, not his using the pastry dough

I was thinking more on the lines of a chicken pot pie - "whose lid is sealed with a ring of pastry dough"
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Old 09-18-2006, 01:11 PM   #14
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Old 09-18-2006, 01:57 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cliveb
A completely amateur thought:
The pressure cooker is sealed, so all the flavour stays in. so do all the salts, minerals, chemicals, colours, etc. Food cooked under pressure must be similar to food cooked in a microwave, ie. there's no escape. Every molecule gets zapped.
Interesting idea clivb. I use both a pressure cooker and slow cooker and find them both very useful appliances, but I do have a bit of a preference for the pressure cooker. It takes less energy to use, and I also imagine the food tastes better from the pressure cooker than from the slow cooker.

But the pressure cooker is not completely sealed. Steam escapes the whole time it is cooking through the vent.
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Old 07-05-2007, 10:12 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bethzaring
But the pressure cooker is not completely sealed. Steam escapes the whole time it is cooking through the vent.
Uh, just to continue a thread started many moons ago... now that I have become more familiar with pressure cooking...

Beth, I don't think steam is supposed to escape all throughout the cooking time. Maybe your pc is old and that's the way it's designed? Doesn't sound right to me though...

My pc is a relatively new model, German-made WMF brand. Steam escapes thru the vent only if there's too much pressure inside. This serves as a warning that the stove heat is too high and needs to be lowered quickly so that the right pressure is maintained and steam does not need to escape. Not lowering the heat leads to continuous escape of steam (ergo, moisture)and this will lead to drying-out of your cooking liquid/food -- definitely not what the pc manufacturer recommends nor something you would want.

So Clive is right, a pressure cooker is meant to be a closed system, where the steam escape valve is a both a safety valve (against excessive pressure) and a means for the cook to adjust the heat/pressure to within the manufacturer's specs.
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Old 07-05-2007, 10:48 AM   #17
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Going back to the original question of slow stewing vs pressure cooking:

Since I've acquired a Le Creuset Dutch oven, I've been able to compare the results of these two cooking methods. I can say that slow stewing (at least with LC) results in meat that are not only very tender with that melt-in-the-mouth quality, they do not fall apart into an unsightly mess. Somehow the meat structure still holds together and is not mushy.

With the pressure cooker on the other hand, the meat gets more mushy than tender. And even if the meat is falling-apart mushy, the meat is kinda stringy.

I've thought about these results and have come to the realization that the main difference between these two cooking methods is cooking temp and cooking time. Slow cooking is done at low temp over a long time while pressure cooking is done at a very high temp over a short time. Since we know that meat fibers toughen at high temps (and probably turns mushy at extremely high temps), one is led to the conclusion that long slow cooking/stewing should theoretically yield better-cooked, more tender meats.

Just thinking out loud...
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Old 07-05-2007, 10:59 AM   #18
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If you were to continue cooking meat in the LeC beyond the point where it is as you describe, it will fall apart and shred just like the PC. You should be able to get the desireable results in the PC as far as the condition of the meat by reducing the cooking time.

As an example, when you make BBQ (pulled) pork at 250F, you cook it to a certain internal temperature at which it will fall apart and be shredable.
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Old 07-05-2007, 11:11 AM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M.
If you were to continue cooking meat in the LeC beyond the point where it is as you describe, it will fall apart and shred just like the PC.
I agree Andy, I think that goes without saying.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M.
You should be able to get the desireable results in the PC as far as the condition of the meat by reducing the cooking time.

As an example, when you make BBQ (pulled) pork at 250F, you cook it to a certain internal temperature at which it will fall apart and be shredable.
That was precisely my point Andy, that meat in a pc, while shreddable, would be mushier/stringier than properly stewed meat (at least in a LC dutch oven.)

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Old 07-05-2007, 12:49 PM   #20
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Do you agree the PC can properly cook stew meat? I just think if it's not cooked as long, PC meat can be the same as LeC meat.

Once you get to the point where either pot gives you shredded meat, there will be little difference.
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