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Old 11-28-2007, 06:32 PM   #1
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Cooking a ham at low temp?

[split from another forum]

I glazed a ham for Thanksgiving at 200F -it wasn't the first time I did this-, the meat was great and looked completely cooked. I checked oven and meat temperature.
Does the bacteria/temperature rationale apply also to ham?

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Old 11-28-2007, 07:10 PM   #2
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Ham is usually already cooked and you are just warming it up, thus the lower temp to get it more evenly warmed. All the "ickies" have been precooked out.

Just a wild guess.
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Old 11-28-2007, 07:18 PM   #3
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Thank you suzie,
The temperature recommendation to cook the ham was much higher than 200F, I wasn't sure if what I did was right after reading the messages.
If you hear about four guys in Michigan suffering of ham poisoning... those dudes are us ! LOL
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Old 11-28-2007, 07:45 PM   #4
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Wouldn't want ya to regret eating a ham!!!!
LOL ham poisoning..... I wonder what one would have to do to a ham to get that.......
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Old 11-29-2007, 12:12 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by suziquzie
LOL ham poisoning..... I wonder what one would have to do to a ham to get that...
LOL Suzi - aside from the meat being spoiled or from holding in the danger zone (40F-140F range) that is an ideal breeding gound for bacteria - the biggest problem is called Trichinosis - and it's from undercookied pork and wild game.

wysiwyg: The first thing you need to do is read the label! It will tell you if the ham is fully cooked and just needs to be heated (or could be served cold) - or if it needs to be fully cooked ... in which case it will have cooking instructions.

FWIW: I've taken a fully cooked ham and "baked" it some more (to heat it up) ... using "Root Beer" to baste it during heating.
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Old 11-29-2007, 12:33 AM   #6
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Michael,
I'm very sorry but, I am a MAN and an Engineer....I don't ask for directions, check instructions manuals or read labels (just kidding), the ham was uncooked.
I cook it at low temperature because at higher temperatures, I end up with a dry piece more suitable to use as shoes sole replacement.
Before I cook it, I leave it submerged in really hot water for about 90 minutes. This reduces the time on the oven, it is a trick Cook Illustrated recommends to reduce oven time and meat dryness.

PS: I realize that if ham is not 100% cooked, there is a possibility of acquiring Trichinosis.
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Old 11-29-2007, 05:54 AM   #7
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Trichinosis is really not an issue with modern pork. Hogs are no longer raised under the same unsanitary conditions as they were decades ago. In addition, they are treated with antibiotics to eliminate the threat of trichinosis.
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Old 11-29-2007, 08:59 AM   #8
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Originally Posted by wysiwyg View Post
Michael,
I'm very sorry but, I am a MAN and an Engineer....I don't ask for directions, check instructions manuals or read labels (just kidding)
Thought you might like this: Cooking For Engineers - Step by Step Recipes and Food for the Analytically Minded
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Old 11-29-2007, 01:30 PM   #9
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It all depends on if it's a cured ham or uncured ham. If it was a cured ham, nothing to worry about. If it was uncured... that's not good.....
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Old 11-29-2007, 01:41 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wysiwyg View Post
Michael,
I'm very sorry but, I am a MAN and an Engineer....I don't ask for directions, check instructions manuals or read labels (just kidding), the ham was uncooked.
I cook it at low temperature because at higher temperatures, I end up with a dry piece more suitable to use as shoes sole replacement.
Before I cook it, I leave it submerged in really hot water for about 90 minutes. This reduces the time on the oven, it is a trick Cook Illustrated recommends to reduce oven time and meat dryness.

PS: I realize that if ham is not 100% cooked, there is a possibility of acquiring Trichinosis.


How hot is the water you are submerging it in? If it's not more than 140 at degrees all times you are asking for trouble doing that, too.

IMO, 200 is far too low to cook an uncooked ham.
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