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Old 12-25-2008, 12:27 PM   #11
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When using pinto beans I tend to add tomatoes, cumin, oregeno, garlic clove and the previously mentioned jalapeno.
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Old 12-25-2008, 10:12 PM   #12
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And a splash of vinegar in the bowl when it is time to eat. YUM!
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Old 12-25-2008, 10:25 PM   #13
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Hi, and merry christmas, just came across this post. A few herbs that might work, would be fresh parsley, saffron, cilantro and thyme.

savory-soup-recipes.com might help you with finding more.
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Old 12-25-2008, 10:53 PM   #14
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I think the bone should be simmered for 6 ~ 8 ~ 10 hours before adding the beans.
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Old 12-25-2008, 11:39 PM   #15
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Ham hock/bone goes in at the same time as the beans and other spices for flavoring. You're not cooking the bone, but extracting the flavors from it.
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Old 12-26-2008, 12:48 AM   #16
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Extended cooking/simmering is required to extract the gelatin/collagen.

That amount of time tends to turn beans mushy, and tends to diminish the spices, etc, especially the aromatics.
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Old 12-26-2008, 12:24 PM   #17
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I put my beans and bone/hock in at the same time, but I don't soak my beans first.
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Old 12-26-2008, 12:53 PM   #18
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There was one soup I made which had me take a scoop of the beans and broth out( when they were soft enough). Blend them. Then add them back to the soup. This way, You can use it as a thickener,without letting the soup cook for hours and turn to mush. Kinda gives you the best of both worlds. Whole beans in the soup to eat plus the pea soup-like thickness as a base. Unless it is that pea-soup uniform thickness your looking for, then let simmer away...
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Old 12-26-2008, 01:50 PM   #19
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Good idea.
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Old 12-26-2008, 02:02 PM   #20
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I just made some bean soup the other night; I use thyme as well. Other than a bay leaf, I try to keep it pretty simple if I'm using leftover ham. I cooked ham with a mustard honey glaze, so some of that flavoring is in the pot. I'll add a diced mirepoix. I also used a different bean, a good Mexican bean. So, I could go beans and cornbread simple, or easily add jalapeno and cilantro for a different taste.
I usually make a ham stock with the bone, then clean the meat/bone. Strain. Then will add the beans (soaked, or quick "soak" ) to cook, along with the cleaned bone. I'll add the meat, and add the diced vegetable according to their cooking time.
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