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Old 11-24-2006, 06:46 PM   #11
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I threw my stock in the fridge. The fat scum all rises to the top and I can just spoon it off.
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Old 11-24-2006, 06:47 PM   #12
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The scum I am talking about is not the fat. I throw mine in the fridge too to get rid of that. The scum is something totally different.
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Old 11-24-2006, 06:48 PM   #13
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hmm. Haven't noticed any scum. ah, well.
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Old 11-24-2006, 06:50 PM   #14
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The scum is the bubbly stuff that comes to the top as you are cooking it. It is the same exact stuff that you see when you go to the ocean and you see the foam in the surf.
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Old 11-24-2006, 08:26 PM   #15
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Scum

Are you making stock with leftover turkey/
If it has been cooked, the protein has already coagulated, and there will be little, or no scum.

I usually make brown chicken stock by roasting the chicken parts in the oven first to brown it, and there is usually almost no scum.
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Old 11-24-2006, 08:28 PM   #16
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I made it with the leftover carcuss, but I also used two raw wings.
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Old 11-24-2006, 08:30 PM   #17
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Hey Walt, you just explained it for me! I rarely use anything but a leftover carcass so that would be why I rarely have scum. Dang, and here I thought it was something about the curvature of the Earth or something wild. LOL.
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Old 11-24-2006, 09:24 PM   #18
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I usually get some scum even with roasted bones, as I roast at a high heat which quickly browns the exterior of the bones but leaves the insides pretty much raw. I have a little wire-mesh strainer about 2" in diameter that I skim with into a bowl every 1/2hr for the first couple hours, and then as needed after that.

Then I pour everything through a large mesh strainer into a smaller 8qt pot (I have big stockpots), clean the first one, and then use a 1qt separator to de-fat the stock into my other 8qt pot. Then I fill my sink half-way with cold-water, and set the pot with stock into it for 20min or so to cool it down. Then it's poured into 2-C ziplock containers and frozen. So I use a big stockpot to cook, two 8qt pots for "processing", and eight 2-C ziplock containers for freezing. If I'm making a 2 gal batch of brown veal stock (yields 2qt of stock and 2qt of demi-glace), I just use my two giant stockpots, and clean one out during the "processing" phase. Usually spend one day every 3 months restocking my stocks/sauces in the freezer. If I ever settle down and buy a house, I'm buying a huge chest freezer and steam-jacket kettle so I only have to do it once a year...

...I'll keep a few museum-grade replicas of human bones in the kettle to scare the $%#@ out of nosy people...
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Old 11-24-2006, 11:31 PM   #19
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GB, it has always been my assumption, nothing more scientific than that, that most of the scum came from blood in the meat.

If I understand the process correctly, Kosher processing of birds requires the birds to bleed after slaughter and then brines the critter to get rid of the rest (how that does it, I am not at all certain).

Is it possible that your bird was either Kosher or that you brined it?

Maybe that is the difference.

Just a guess.
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Old 11-24-2006, 11:47 PM   #20
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I made stock today from the turkey carcass and also had zero scum. As a matter of fact, I made a small stock from two turkey wings and a neck (all raw) on Wednesday and there was no scum there either.

I guess these turkeys were a better class of bird and not the scum of the earth.
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