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Old 11-14-2019, 07:59 AM   #1
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Microfibre kitchen cloth??

Is all kitchen cloth marketed to be made of "Microfiber" the same thing no matter which brands and advertising terms they are? Will there be any difference in quality between a "better" brand name and no-name brand?? Would the cheaper one lose its "fiber" more easily??

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Old 11-14-2019, 08:22 AM   #2
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There is definitely differences in quality, but in my experience it's mostly about look and feel rather than performance.

The more expensive ones feel softer, and have a pattern knitted on one side. My biggest gripe with all of them is that they are not very absorbent.
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Old 11-14-2019, 09:15 AM   #3
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I agree about them not being absorbent. I always get linen or cotton towels and dish cloths. Also, microfiber is just a fancy term for fine synthetic cloth of many kinds. BTW, here's a related matter with microfiber that's been around for a while, that may interest seafood lovers:
https://www.drweil.com/health-wellne...ofiber-menace/
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Old 11-14-2019, 10:31 AM   #4
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Here we go again.

There is a difference. If your microfibre towels are not absorbent, they are not good microfibre towels. One of the best things about them is that they can soak up a lot of water.

The ones with a "waffle" pattern in them are generally the ones that can hold the most water. I can dry my entire car with just one of those towels.

Cheap microfibre towels, like cheap terrycloth towels tend to just push water around. I hate that.

Okay, I've got my Nomex on, so I'm ready to get flamed.

CD
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Old 11-14-2019, 10:56 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pepperhead212 View Post
I agree about them not being absorbent. I always get linen or cotton towels and dish cloths. Also, microfiber is just a fancy term for fine synthetic cloth of many kinds. BTW, here's a related matter with microfiber that's been around for a while, that may interest seafood lovers:
https://www.drweil.com/health-wellne...ofiber-menace/
I don't find that microfibre cloths are consistently non-absorbent. Even some of the cheap terry style ones can be absorbent.

That article is talking about microfibres from any synthetic clothing and fabric, not particularly about microfibre cloths. If you care about this, then get a filter designed to trap microfibres coming out of your washing machine. Thank you for bringing it up. I have been meaning to check out what is available in that type of filters and needed a reminder. BTW, microfibre cloths can be made of rayon, which is synthetic but made from cellulose and biodegrades.
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Old 11-14-2019, 11:22 AM   #6
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No flame intended, but I have yet to discover a MF cloth that will lift the water off of polished stainless steel or the plastic of a food processor bowl. It requires far more work than a good cotton terry or paper towel.

They may hold a lot of water, but when dry, they initially just seem to break the water down into fine droplets over the surface of the kitchenware you're trying to dry as opposed to wicking it into the towel.

They're great for dusting though.
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Old 11-14-2019, 12:23 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by ScottinPollock View Post
No flame intended, but I have yet to discover a MF cloth that will lift the water off of polished stainless steel or the plastic of a food processor bowl. It requires far more work than a good cotton terry or paper towel.

They may hold a lot of water, but when dry, they initially just seem to break the water down into fine droplets over the surface of the kitchenware you're trying to dry as opposed to wicking it into the towel.

They're great for dusting though.
I didn't expect to flame me. I was referring to a previous microfibre thread that got heated. If the "usual suspects" show up, it may get heated, again. But, maybe we'll get lucky.

Drying plastic, like food processor bowls is difficult, for some reason. Even paper towels sometimes have a hard time, and paper towels are wasteful, but very absorbent.

I have found that microfibre towels seem to absorb better once they are a little damp. But, I've observed that with other materials, too. I don't know why. When I first start wiping, they don't do as well, and then get better, until they are fully saturated. Fully saturated, nothing can absorb water.

I've also found that water on a cold surface is a lot more stubborn than on a warm to hot surface.

The waffle microfibre towels I use on my car are very expensive. They do an amazing job. They are easily ten years old, I only use them for that one chore, and I wash them in detergent only. They seem to be getting better with age.

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Old 11-14-2019, 01:20 PM   #8
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Although I have micofiber towels, my favorite cleaning towels come from Trader Joe's.

They are superior to anything I've used and absorb an extraordinary amount of water . Amazon sells them, but they are much cheaper at the store. The way I love TJ's, you'd think I was on their payroll. I wish!!
https://www.amazon.com/Trader-Joes-R...a-756127957650
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Old 11-14-2019, 02:37 PM   #9
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paper towels are wasteful
Yeah I thought maybe I should expand on my use of paper towels shortly after making that last post. While I do use paper towels to dry kitchenware, they then get tossed to a small rack in the corner of a windowsill. They dry surprisingly fast there, and I can normally rotate through three of them and have at least one of them dry enough to do the job through a full session of cooking/cleanup. Since they're just wiping off fresh water, they can be used again and again (for days). Once they get thread bare, they're used to wipe up gunk, and then put in the recycle bin.

Living in California, one could well ponder what is best for the environment... conserving the water and energy to wash kitchen towels or recycling a very small amount of paper.
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Old 11-20-2019, 11:58 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kayelle View Post
Although I have micofiber towels, my favorite cleaning towels come from Trader Joe's.

They are superior to anything I've used and absorb an extraordinary amount of water . Amazon sells them, but they are much cheaper at the store. The way I love TJ's, you'd think I was on their payroll. I wish!!
https://www.amazon.com/Trader-Joes-R...a-756127957650
What is this cloth made of ?
Wow. $10.99 for two packs only??
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Old 11-20-2019, 03:55 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by kenny1999 View Post
What is this cloth made of ?
Wow. $10.99 for two packs only??

These cloths are made of Viscose.."A miracle fabric that absorbs over 10 times it's weight of any liquid". I just bought another pack of two at TJ's store and they were $2.99.
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Old 11-20-2019, 05:21 PM   #12
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Kayelle, I saw those when we stopped at a Trader Joe's in Naples last week. Bought me two packs. They do work great!
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Old 11-20-2019, 06:28 PM   #13
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I don't have a TJs real close by, but there's one that I occasionally go to, to meet a gardening friend, to trade things. I started a list, and put these in there, 'cause I know, by the time I'd go there, this would be far from my mind!

I hope it's one of those things that they keep carrying, not one of those fly by night items.
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Old 11-20-2019, 06:41 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kayelle View Post
These cloths are made of Viscose.."A miracle fabric that absorbs over 10 times it's weight of any liquid". I just bought another pack of two at TJ's store and they were $2.99.
Cool, I looked up viscose and it is made from plant materials. I'm not sure how environmentally friendly the process of making viscose is, but when fibres come out in the washing machine, they should be biodegradable, unlike synthetic fibres.
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