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Old 04-20-2011, 02:05 AM   #41
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I crush my garlic unpeeled too. One of the advantanges of crushing it with the chef's knife, instead of unpeeled with a garlic press is that you can see any brown or otherwise icky bits and cut them off before they go in the food.

For vinaigrettes I squish, peel, (cut off any icky bits), chop, squish by pushing down while dragging the side of the knife across the garlic, and then mince. I like it to be a paste for vinaigrette. I seems to help the emulsion.

When you do the squish and drag throw down a little salt. It helps to make the paste.
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Old 04-20-2011, 03:26 AM   #42
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To crack hazelnuts.
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Old 04-20-2011, 10:26 AM   #43
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aunt Bea View Post
When you do the squish and drag throw down a little salt. It helps to make the paste.
Thanks for the tip

I don't know why I didn't think of that. I used to add salt when I made the paste in a mortar with a pestle.
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Old 04-20-2011, 04:16 PM   #44
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Boy, all of this hating on the garlic press! I actually love mine. I have the Zyliss 12040 press mentioned in an earlier post.

I go through about 4 or 5 heads of garlic a week and find it to be a real time saver.
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Old 04-20-2011, 05:48 PM   #45
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Even a 6 inch lever is a substantial multiple of force. But for most food, it's overkill. Whether to slice or paste, I usually prepare garlic with my knife, but I have been known to thumb-press them through any sieve I have on hand or in drawer. I also don't have a citrus press.
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Old 04-20-2011, 08:58 PM   #46
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Quote:
Originally Posted by taxlady View Post
I crush my garlic unpeeled too. One of the advantanges of crushing it with the chef's knife, instead of unpeeled with a garlic press is that you can see any brown or otherwise icky bits and cut them off before they go in the food.

For vinaigrettes I squish, peel, (cut off any icky bits), chop, squish by pushing down while dragging the side of the knife across the garlic, and then mince. I like it to be a paste for vinaigrette. I seems to help the emulsion.
For vinagrette I just take a couple of cloves of garlic and cut them in half, then put them in a small jar of olive oil. Then when I make my dressing the garlic flavor is infused into the oil already and I only have to add vinegar or lemon and some other herbs and seasonings as necessary.
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Old 04-20-2011, 09:33 PM   #47
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Originally Posted by mkaylady View Post
For vinagrette I just take a couple of cloves of garlic and cut them in half, then put them in a small jar of olive oil. Then when I make my dressing the garlic flavor is infused into the oil already and I only have to add vinegar or lemon and some other herbs and seasonings as necessary.
When you leave garlic in oil, you risk botulism.

It's Your Health - Garlic-in-oil [Health Canada, 2009]
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Old 04-21-2011, 05:05 PM   #48
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Originally Posted by taxlady View Post
When you leave garlic in oil, you risk botulism.

It's Your Health - Garlic-in-oil [Health Canada, 2009]
I keep it refrigerated and I use it up right away. According to that article it is OK then. If anybody leaves it out of the fridge or keeps it too long in the fridge, then definitely they should be careful of that.
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Old 04-21-2011, 08:15 PM   #49
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I keep it refrigerated and I use it up right away. According to that article it is OK then. If anybody leaves it out of the fridge or keeps it too long in the fridge, then definitely they should be careful of that.
Not necessarily true. How long is too long? How fast does the botulism organism grow? How much toxin can it produce in 24 hours? Do you know? Are you willing to risk the health -- even the life -- of your family and friends? Just because no one has gotten ill yet doesn't mean it's safe.

Here's what the University of California at Davis -- a leading agricultural school in the state that grows the most garlic in North America -- has to say on the subject:
BOTULISM WARNING

Regardless of its flavor potency, garlic is a lowacid
vegetable. The pH of a clove of garlic typically
ranges from 5.3 to 6.3. As with all low-acid
vegetables, garlic will support the growth and
subsequent toxin production of the bacterium
Clostridium botulinum when given the right conditions.
These conditions include improper
home canning and improper preparation and
storage of fresh herb and garlic-in-oil mixtures.
Moisture, room temperature, lack of oxygen,
and low-acid conditions all favor the growth of
Clostridium botulinum. When growing, this bacterium
produces an extremely potent toxin that
causes the illness botulism. If untreated, death
can result within a few days
of consuming the
toxic food. It is important to follow the directions
in this publication carefully to make sure
your preserved garlic is safe.


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Old 04-21-2011, 09:17 PM   #50
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Maybe garlic in cider or wine vinegar would be a better idea.
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