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Old 01-17-2008, 04:06 PM   #31
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geetika,
I have Baumalu pans, got to know them in France thru some friends that work in the culinary industry and purchased my first frying pan in 2002. I ended up with seven total (2 fry pans, 2 Windsor pans, 2 sautee pans and one casserole), they are great.
When cleaning them with acetone, make sure you only do it on the outside since the varnish is only on the cooper. I clean these pans with warm water and soap and use wooden spoons only to avoid damaging the tin, which is holding pretty good so far.
I guess wear will depend in how often you use the pans. If the cooper needs polishing, I rub a mix of baking soda with lemon juice or salt and vinegar.
Relative to temperature of use (I am not sure what kind of stove you have, I have gas) you will notice that will require less heating because of the cooper efficiency. I had to put pieces of cork on all the lids, because even with low heat, it is very hard to handle them since they are too hot. Make sure you don't leave a pan empty on the stove.
PM is you need more information and enjoy them !
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Old 01-17-2008, 04:16 PM   #32
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Thanks, to all the forum members who shed some light on the confusion I had regarding the Baumalu pans. I have an electric stove and wonder if that affects the heat conductivity of the pans. Anyways, I am waiting to receive an email from the company that sells these pans from France and will post any useful tips that are sent in the mail.

Merci!
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Old 01-17-2008, 04:46 PM   #33
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geetika,
An electric stove will not affect the conductivity of the pans. Perhaps the heating of the element can't be controlled as good as a gas element, but the pans should work jut fine.
I used one of my pans at a friend's kitchen for Thanksgiving and it was fine.
I don't know how induction heating elements work, but from what I've read these pans are not compatible since they have no magnetic properties.
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Old 01-17-2008, 05:49 PM   #34
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Induction elements don't require magnetic metals to work. This is a fallacy. Induction stoves work by creating a magnetic field that expands and contracts in relation to the alternating current passing through copper windings, with a steel core to focus the magnetic field (like one side fo a transformer). As the moving field passes over the pan metal, it induces electical currents in the pan called "eddy currents". As iron is a fairly poor electrical conductor, these eddy currents create heat due to the natural resistance of the pan metal. Ferric metals in general are poor conductors, which is why they are not used as wires (at least that's one of the reasons they're not used). Both aluminum and copper are excellent conductors of electricity, with very low electrical resistance. Gold is as good or better. None of these will create much heat when an electrical current runs through them. But, if you pass enough current through them, as when uncontrolled current runs through the windings of a stalled motor, then even copper and aluminum will get hot enough to destroy the winding integrity, melting the insullation and creating short circuit conditions within the motor.

Don't worry about the electrical current generated in the iron or steel pans though. There is not enough to even tickle you. Besides, you don't create a closed circuit for current to flow through.

Copper and aluminum pans don't work on induction stoves because they don't have enough electrical resistance to generate sufficeint heat to be usable. It as nothing to do with pan magnetics.

There. I've said it and the misinformation is laid to rest. I'm a satisfied man again, even if this had nothing to do with cooking, or the topic.

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Old 01-17-2008, 07:00 PM   #35
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I will be using my new copper pans today in the evening, can not wait to do sooooo!!!! Well since, you allayed my fears about using it on a electric stove I am looking at a French recipe book-a good start to cook in a French pot. I think copper can not be used on induction heat.

Also, I wiped clean my pots with acetone twice is that good enough? A greenish-black hue appeared on my towel while cleaning it, was that the varnish wearing off the copper pot? Thanks, wysiwyg for helping me and let me know of any other tips that I can benefit from.

Bonjour!!
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Old 01-17-2008, 07:04 PM   #36
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for those of us who want copper and have induction units, there is now an induction ready burner plate to put between the induction stove and the copper pot. just fyi. no I don't have one.
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Old 01-18-2008, 12:55 AM   #37
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geetika,
Wiping your Baumalu cookware with a cotton piece embebbed with acetone should be enough to clean the cooper. Not cleaning the cookware will not affect the performance, it will just turn the cooper really dark when exposed to heat and will be more difficult to clean afterward.
Bonne chance and salut!
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Old 01-18-2008, 01:37 PM   #38
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Thanks, wysiwyg for providing me with useful tips regarding the Baumalu cookware. I was just wondering does the tin lining inside discolor with regular use of the cookware? and if so can I use some organic methods of cleaning the lining?

Also it is cool that one can use copper on induction heat.

Bon Appetit!
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Old 01-18-2008, 04:16 PM   #39
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geetika,
I never thought about this... I regularly clean my pans with hot water and soap and dry them right away. Anyways, I check my pans and in some, the tin looks darker and more dull so I did a test. Mixing lemon juice with baking soda help bring up the shine, but it wasn't amazing. I didn't want to try something more abrasive like regular or sea salt until I get more information about tin hardness. I also going to check with my sister, she is a Biochemical Dr. perhaps she knows about tin interaction with acids, etc.
As soon as I know, I will let you know.
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Old 02-01-2008, 11:48 AM   #40
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A few words about cleaning new copper cookware.
If you really want to know whether your copper is lacquer coated. Try nail polish remover. Nail polish is lacquer, and remover is lacquer thinner.
Why bother. Assume that most copper cookware is lacquered at the factory to extend shelf life. Get a small can of lacquer thinner and wash and clean your pots. It is cheap and available at the big box, paint, or hardware store. Any new kitchen item should be thoroughly cleaned before it is used. You don't know who has handled it or where it has been. Nearly all have manufacturing oil remaining on them.
Mineral spirits is not lacquer thinner. It is a paint thinner. It will not touch lacquer.
Most important. Do not use acetone or lacquer thinner in the kitchen, especially in a closed home, and leave your smoking for later. Both have toxic and highly flammeable fumes. Nothing ruins a good cooking day like blowing up your kitchen.
Don't be afraid of using your new cookware. I have used mine for years and have never had a problem with heat. If I wanted to heat a pan before putting in ingredents, I would fill it with water. A pot full of water will not go above 212 degrees and the pot would heat evenly.
Lastly, tin darkens with heat, use, and age. This is normal and I believe that if you try to remove it, you will destroy the lining. Like the scratches on the bottom of the pan. darkened tin only indicates a well used and well loved pot.
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