"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Cookware and Accessories > Cookware
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 10-26-2012, 06:35 AM   #1
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 36
Need a new pan for my sauce

I have mostly cheap cookware and I make do. I have a non-stick skillet I use for making this great "pink sauce" for chicken and pasta that my family loves. It's about time to toss the thing and I want to get a better pan for the job. I want to eventually get some cast iron stuff but I assume stainless would be better for this job because of the ingredients (tomato sauce). It will also be the pan I use for browning ground beef.

So is stainless the way to go? Can I get something fairly inexpensive that will do the job?

Any advice is appreciated

Thanks

__________________

__________________
I'm just a Dad who loves food and I live in a house full of fussy eaters... it's a challenge!
jcv is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-2012, 08:24 AM   #2
Sous Chef
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 545
Quote:
Originally Posted by jcv
I have mostly cheap cookware and I make do. I have a non-stick skillet I use for making this great "pink sauce" for chicken and pasta that my family loves. It's about time to toss the thing and I want to get a better pan for the job. I want to eventually get some cast iron stuff but I assume stainless would be better for this job because of the ingredients (tomato sauce). It will also be the pan I use for browning ground beef.

So is stainless the way to go? Can I get something fairly inexpensive that will do the job?

Any advice is appreciated

Thanks
I would not go with cast iron. It may be me and my lack of cast iron skills but I always get pieces of black seasoning coming off in my sauce and you will need a lot of oil to fry onions or whatever u put in the sauce....
But if you want to sear a steak it's the best pan to have
__________________

__________________
Siegal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-2012, 08:35 AM   #3
Head Chef
 
sparrowgrass's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Highest point in Missouri
Posts: 1,794
Is the non-stick-ness important to you? If so, I would go for another inexpensive non-stick pan. If not, buy the heaviest stainless you can afford--thin ones warp. No recommendation on brands, but when I was buying new pans, I got them from Amazon warehouse. I got some great deals on Calphalon, which are aluminum but quite sturdy.

Now, let's have that recipe for pink sauce!!
__________________
I just haven't been the same
since that house fell on my sister.
sparrowgrass is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-2012, 12:01 PM   #4
Master Chef
 
Chief Longwind Of The North's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA,Michigan
Posts: 9,229
If you heat your stainless steel dry, with no oil in it, then add oil when the pan is heated, it's very close to non-stick in performance, and ease of cleanup. Plus, it sears meats beautifully, if you have the pans with the encapsulated aluminum or copper bottoms under the stainless.

I just stay away from non-stick as it isn't durable enough, and then there's that degraded teflon chip thing.


If cast iron is seasoned properly, there is no problem with cooking acidic foods, such as tomato, in pans and pots made from it. And it'll last forever. But then again, I would think good SS should last a lifetime or two as well. Stick free, even the best has a limited life.

Seeeeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
__________________
“No amount of success outside the home can compensate for failure within the home…"

Check out my blog for the friendliest cooking instruction on the net. Go ahead. You know you want to.- http://gwnorthsfamilycookin.wordpress.com/
Chief Longwind Of The North is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-2012, 12:11 PM   #5
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,360
I think SS is a great choice as it's durable and non-reactive. I strongly recommend tri-ply SS. That gives you the uniform heat distribution of aluminum protected by the outer shell of SS. Lots of brands.
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-2012, 01:18 PM   #6
Head Chef
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Richmond, Va
Posts: 1,228
IMO making a sauce and browning meat are two different cooking techniques and require two different pans. I would get a cast iron skillet, preferably vintage, both for cost and quality, and a sauce pan of your choice, generally stainless steel.
__________________
Bigjim68 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-2012, 01:32 PM   #7
Executive Chef
 
Whiskadoodle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Twin Cities Mn
Posts: 2,953
I was surprised to watch my SIL make a long slow cooked tomato sauce in her CI dutch oven. She says that's what she always uses. She scrubs it out with hot soapy water. The pan looks fine.

I recommend if you buy a stainless steel pan that you make sure it has a heavy duty bottom. I kind of like the looks of this pan. A wee bit pricey though.

Calphalon AccuCore 5-qt Dutch Oven Stainless Steel, Aluminum, Copper at Calphalon Store
__________________
Whiskadoodle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-2012, 02:55 PM   #8
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 16,856
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiskadoodle View Post
I was surprised to watch my SIL make a long slow cooked tomato sauce in her CI dutch oven. She says that's what she always uses. She scrubs it out with hot soapy water. The pan looks fine. [/url]
I only use my non-stick pan for eggs and crepes. Before I got my Le Creuset Dutch ovens, I used a cast-iron Dutch oven or skillet to make lasagna and spaghetti sauces, no problem. If any iron leached into the food, I considered it a dietary supplement

DH gave me a set of Calphalon saucepans and skillets for Christmas a few years ago, and I love them. I haven't used this brand, but other people here have said Tramontina works well for them and it's less expensive.
__________________
The trouble with eating Italian food is that five or six days later you're hungry again. ~ George Miller
GotGarlic is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-2012, 03:18 PM   #9
Master Chef
 
CharlieD's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: USA,Minnesota
Posts: 8,393
I never had good luck with SS, but in all the truth I never really cook those days either, just here and there, sometimes. So maybe I simply did not know what I was doing at the time.
As far a very good non-stick, I'd recommend to get one from Sam's club, they have them in commercial style, in all kind of sizes, dirt cheap, but very good quality.
__________________
You are what you eat.
CharlieD is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-2012, 03:44 PM   #10
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,360
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bigjim68 View Post
IMO making a sauce and browning meat are two different cooking techniques and require two different pans. I would get a cast iron skillet, preferably vintage, both for cost and quality, and a sauce pan of your choice, generally stainless steel.

True but...

If you're browning ground beef for a tomato-based meat sauce, you probably don't want to dirty two pans.
__________________

__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
sauce

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:31 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.