"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Cookware and Accessories > Cookware
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 11-11-2007, 04:26 PM   #1
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 6
Pan Advice

Hi there,

I have recently started to enjoy cooking as a regular hobby and would like to build a collection of quality pans, however I was looking for some advice in the best materials/ brands.

I do not immediately need to purchase a whole set, so was considering buying one or two high quality pans and building on these in the near future, rather than settling for an average 5 piece set that may only last me a few years.

Could anyone recommend the best material for each type of pan/ cooking and the best brands?

I have considered Mauviel copperware in the hope that they should last many years? Should this be the case?

Many thanks,

Scott

__________________

__________________
ScottWild is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-11-2007, 04:37 PM   #2
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,387
Hi Scott. Welcome to DC.

Your approach is a good one. Picking up a pan or two at a time as needed is a smart approach. That way you only end up with stuff you already know you need.

Quality copperware will last a lifetime. Stainless steellined is more durable than tin lined.

There are earlier threads in this forum that discuss this very question and will provide you with a lot of good information on the pros and cons of the different pan materials.

Happy reading!
__________________

__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-13-2007, 09:07 AM   #3
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 6
Thanks,

I have had a read through some threads. However, I now feel a little apprehensive about copper cookware; removing the lacquerer, maintenance, damage from excessive heat etc. Would you still recommend them to a person who has limited experience in the cooking world?

Scott
__________________
ScottWild is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-13-2007, 09:29 AM   #4
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 4,630
All Clad stainless steel line. I'll never go back to anything else.

Like Andy said, instead of buying a whole set of pans that would more than likely include pieces you won't use, or not include pieces you want, buy them seperately.

I would, however, recommend glass lids. You can pick these up pretty cheap anywhere. Just make sure you can go from the stove top to the oven with them.
__________________
Jeekinz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-13-2007, 09:47 AM   #5
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 6
This may seem like a rather naive question, but can copper go in the oven?

What stainless steel brand would you recommend? I am completely undecided what to go for in all honesty!!
__________________
ScottWild is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-13-2007, 10:12 AM   #6
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 4,630
I'm not too sure about the copper. Whatever you buy, make sure it can go in the oven. Some can't.

Some cookware just has the copper exterior. A copper cooking surface will react with certain acidic foods.

I would suggest All Clad. You can find them at decent prices here.
__________________
Jeekinz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-13-2007, 03:55 PM   #7
Head Chef
 
Caine's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: CHINATOWN
Posts: 2,314
Send a message via MSN to Caine
Every time you buy an All Clad item, you are paying not only for yours, but for the ones all the celebrity chefs get for free from All-Clad to use on their television programs.

You can get the same quality, and the same guarantee, as All-Clad from Le Gourmet Chef and their tri-ply is about 1/3 the price of All-Clad. You can shop on line or visit one of their stores in an outlet mall near you. I have every piece in the set shown, and then some, and I guarantee you will use every one of the items included in that set. If you only want to buy a few pieces at a time, or if you want to add more pans later, they have a fine selection of individual pots and pans.
__________________
Caine is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-13-2007, 05:30 PM   #8
Master Chef
 
Michael in FtW's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Fort Worth, TX
Posts: 6,592
Quote:
Originally Posted by ScottWild
I have had a read through some threads. However, I now feel a little apprehensive about copper cookware; removing the lacquerer, maintenance, damage from excessive heat etc. Would you still recommend them to a person who has limited experience in the cooking world?
NO! I, personally, would never recommend tin-lined copper for an inexperienced cook. If you want the look of copper but something that is forgiving that you probably are not going to screw up easily - get stainless steel lined copper.

All cookware materials have their advantages and disadvantages, and in some cases so do shapes. Well made cookware will last for years, if used according to its abilities and cabalities - and it doesn't have to be copper, nor does brand, or material, always make a difference in durability. You might get some ideas from reading the articles on this site - Buying Guides.
__________________
"It ain't what you don't know that gets you in trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so." - Mark Twain
Michael in FtW is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-13-2007, 05:46 PM   #9
Master Chef
 
CharlieD's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: USA,Minnesota
Posts: 8,399
As far as copper goes, let me just ask you one thing, have you ever seen it used in any restaurant? I bet not. So why would you use it at home, for looks? Or were you actually going to cook?
As far as SS goes I love it for pots, but not for frying pan. I just do not have time and patients for it.
I'd go with comercial grade non-stick and/or anodized frying pans. And SS pots.
Doesn't hurt to have some aluminum pots ither.
__________________
You are what you eat.
CharlieD is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-24-2007, 09:00 PM   #10
Senior Cook
 
wysiwyg's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Michigan
Posts: 446
Send a message via MSN to wysiwyg
CharlieD,
I lived for a short time in France and Belgium. All the restaurants I've visited use cooper pans. I believe this is because historically gas is more expensive in Europe and cooper pans are more efficient, requiring less heat. Since gas is not so expensive in USA, other materials, not so efficient as cooper, but less expensive are used mostly for cookware.
__________________

__________________
"Tell me what you eat, and I will tell you what you are" Anthelme Brillat-Savarin
wysiwyg is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:42 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.