Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums

Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums (http://www.discusscooking.com/forums/)
-   Cook's Tools (http://www.discusscooking.com/forums/f88/)
-   -   Tomatoes fell apart while slicing on de Buyer mandoline (http://www.discusscooking.com/forums/f88/tomatoes-fell-apart-while-slicing-on-de-buyer-mandoline-44178.html)

dianabell 03-12-2008 06:32 PM

Tomatoes fell apart while slicing on de Buyer mandoline
 
I tried my new de Buyer mandoline today. I was impressed and grateful there was a demonstration video because I don't know if I could have figured it out without it.

I sliced onions, sweet potatoes, and tomatoes with the straight blade. The tomatoes didn't slice well at all. They pretty much fell apart. Is a madoline of this quality not meant for slicing tomatoes or do you think I could have been doing something wrong?

Diane

dianabell 03-12-2008 07:48 PM

After doing more research, I see that de Buyer has a "V mandoline" and regular straight across blade mandoline. Mine is not the V mandoline so maybe that's why it didn't cut the tomatoes well.

Jeff G. 03-12-2008 08:25 PM

I would say the straight blade is the problem.

pugger 03-14-2008 03:02 PM

Try it again
 
Try it again, chill the tomatoes in the fridge for an hour or so. Cut thicker & slow. I'd try that before giving up on it. :wink:

GB 03-14-2008 03:08 PM

No please do not put your tomato in the fridge. It will destroy some of the flavor compounds that make tomatoes so tasty.

A tomato is not really the type of thing you would slice with a mandolin. You need something firmer like the other things you already sliced.

BreezyCooking 03-14-2008 04:59 PM

Too ripe/soft perhaps? Whether or not I'm going to use a mandoline or hand-slice tomatoes very thinly, if they're uber ripe it's very difficult to get clean slices. If I need really thin slices for presentation or for a pizza topping for instance, I try to select firmer ones.

Don't get me wrong - I'm not advocating using underripe fruit, just using firmer ones when paper-thin slices are called for.

SpiritWolf 03-14-2008 06:14 PM

Thats what I was thinking BreezyCooking, maybe the Tomatoes are a tad too ripe, try useing ripe but still firm tommys and see how you go.

auntdot 03-14-2008 07:03 PM

The first thing I also thought of was the ripeness.

You purchased an expensive and supposedly very good product.

Don't give up on it so soon.

Play with it, put it through its paces. We have a fancy mandoline tucked away, which we rarely use and cannot even remember the brand. With the two of us it is usually just as easy to take out a knife, and we both have pretty decent knife skills for just your average Jane and Joe cooks. But the mandoline works great when we need it.

Don't know the advantages of V shape rather than straight cut, ours I believe is straight cut. But if one were significantly better than the other, everyone would buy just one.

Am sure there are folks who will be along to help more than I can. But as I say would keep trying. Sometimes it takes a while to learn how to use a specific product.

Good luck.

GB 03-14-2008 07:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by auntdot (Post 567132)

Don't know the advantages of V shape rather than straight cut, ours I believe is straight cut. But if one were significantly better than the other, everyone would buy just one.

Not really true. A good straight cut mandolin is significantly better than a v slicer. The reason not everyone just buys the better one is price. A good straight mandolin has an adjustable blade. They also usually have blade attachments so you can do other types of cuts.

A V slicer is not adjustable and significantly less expensive. They are often times plastic instead of metal.

Mandolins just are not made to cut soft things like a tomato. You are better off using a sharp knife.

kitchenelf 03-14-2008 07:50 PM

Ditto on just using a knife for a tomato!!!


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:06 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.