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legend_018 05-24-2008 05:19 PM

When and how to clean a pan
 
ok, this goes for non stick pans OR stainless steel. What exactly do you do to clean it. I have heard to wait until it cools. Doesn't that make it harder to clean? I usually run it under hot water and scrape it a little and than leave it so I can eat dinner and I get to it later. Any tips?

Andy M. 05-24-2008 06:30 PM

If you sear some meat in a pan and deglaze it to dissolve the fond for a sauce, you are cleaning it. When I use a SS pan tho brown or sear, when I'm done with the pan, I get it hot and put water into the hot pan. That will help lift off any cooked on crud. Then when dinner is done it cleans up easily.

legend_018 05-24-2008 06:59 PM

Thanks, I'll give that a try.Actually that is sort of what I've been doing. usually when done...the pan is still pretty hot so I just put hot water in it.

Katie H 05-24-2008 07:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Andy M. (Post 612534)
If you sear some meat in a pan and deglaze it to dissolve the fond for a sauce, you are cleaning it. When I use a SS pan tho brown or sear, when I'm done with the pan, I get it hot and put water into the hot pan. That will help lift off any cooked on crud. Then when dinner is done it cleans up easily.


Same here, Andy. Doing it this way requires very little "scrubbing" to clean.

LadyCook61 05-24-2008 07:27 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Andy M. (Post 612534)
If you sear some meat in a pan and deglaze it to dissolve the fond for a sauce, you are cleaning it. When I use a SS pan tho brown or sear, when I'm done with the pan, I get it hot and put water into the hot pan. That will help lift off any cooked on crud. Then when dinner is done it cleans up easily.

I do the same thing.

Robo410 05-24-2008 09:34 PM

"thermal shock" which can warp or crack a pan is plunging a hot pan into a sinkful of cold water. Puting some water (warm or hot into a pan on the stove ) really shouldn't damage a good heavy pan. But if the pan has cooled and stuff is stuck, put water in the pan and heat it up on the stove...it'll come loose just fine.

Katie H 05-24-2008 09:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Robo410 (Post 612624)
"thermal shock" which can warp or crack a pan is plunging a hot pan into a sinkfull of cold water. Putting some water (warm or hot into a pan on the stove ) really shouldn't damage a good heavy pan. But if the pan has cooled and stuff is stuck, put water in the pan and heat it up on the stove...it'll come loose just fine.

Absolutely, Robo. I NEVER put cold or even warm water into a hot pan. Good way to ruin a pan.

Andy M. 05-24-2008 10:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Robo410 (Post 612624)
"thermal shock" which can warp or crack a pan is plunging a hot pan into a sinkful of cold water. Puting some water (warm or hot into a pan on the stove ) really shouldn't damage a good heavy pan. But if the pan has cooled and stuff is stuck, put water in the pan and heat it up on the stove...it'll come loose just fine.


I don't know about you, but I never have a sinkful of cold water. I was suggesting putting some water into the still hot pan to "deglaze" the pan, making it easier to clean. That works for me and has never caused a warped pan.

GB 05-25-2008 09:12 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Andy M. (Post 612660)
I don't know about you, but I never have a sinkful of cold water. I was suggesting putting some water into the still hot pan to "deglaze" the pan, making it easier to clean. That works for me and has never caused a warped pan.

People who do the two sink wash method have a sink full of cold water sometimes. As we learned from another thread, some people use cold water to wash their dishes.

The other thing that will cause thermal shock is taking a hot pan and putting it under cold running water.

Deglazing after cooking, whether making a sauce or not, is the best way to clean a pan. Pour some liquid in the pan while it is still on the stove and scrape up the bits. Cleanup will be a breeze. If I do not feel like waiting then I will wait just a very short time for the pan to cool off just a little bit and then wash under the hottest water I can stand. That way to pan will not go into thermal shock and will not warp.

Finmar001 05-27-2008 10:35 AM

You can put some vinegar and boil. Or else leave it to soak overnight and the next day

it will come off easily


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