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Thraingaar 07-16-2009 02:24 AM

Seeking Advice
 
Hello all,
I am seeking help on a purchase of a new chef's knife.
I currently use a Global G-2 and (for the most part) it made it through school intact. I perfer the Japanese Gyuto knives with western style handles. I have narrowed my selection down to a few knives and am unsure where I should lean to and why. I know almost zero about the various makeup of the blades and all the carbon and steel ratings. Here's what I am looking at.
1. Hattori (HD-8) Damascus Series
2. Hiromot Tenmi-Jyuraku Damascus series
3. Misono UX10
Sharpening will be done as needed by a professional. I am looking for balance, edge retention and durablity to use professionally.
I am asking for any advice that can be given, including recommending other knives. Thanks.

CasperImproved 07-16-2009 02:33 AM

You already surpass my knowledge on knives, so I think I'd be asking you questions :-)

I have a paring knife, a serrated edge bread knife, an 8" chef's knife with heavy blade and tongue, and a fillet knife for the fish. Other than that, I can't answer your blade questions. I have a sharpening stone, and I keep my blades sharp, but know little else.

But I'll help with other questions if you have them :-)

Bob

msmofet 07-16-2009 03:30 AM

Wusthof classic
2 1/2" Paring knife (which is curved and looks like a mini boning knife)
3 1/2" Paring knife
5" Santoku
6" Cook's knife
6" Cleaver

Cuisinart
5" Santoku
2 Piece Carving set
all have blade covers (except the cleaver which i have hanging by the hole on my wall)
and i keep them in an OXO Stainless Steel Utensil Holder
i also have one of those serrated bread knife

CasperImproved 07-16-2009 04:04 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by msmofet (Post 836238)
Wusthof classic
2 1/2" Paring knife (which is curved and looks like a mini boning knife)
3 1/2" Paring knife
5" Santoku
6" Cook's knife
6" Cleaver

Cuisinart
5" Santoku
2 Piece Carving set
all have blade covers (except the cleaver which i have hanging by the hole on my wall)
and i keep them in an OXO Stainless Steel Utensil Holder
i also have one of those serrated bread knife


You have my curiosity now. What hole? And how did it happen?

Curious minds, and all that.

Bob

GB 07-16-2009 08:33 AM

I think she means the hole in her cleaver, not a hole in her wall :wink:

Thraingaar, hang tight. We do have some knife experts here who will be able to give you excellent advice. I am sure they will answer your questions shortly.

luvs 07-16-2009 10:04 AM

i own messermeister that my school gave me, Chef that school gave me, & i own a wusthoff 5" classic hollow santoku that i love. the other knives, they're okay.

msmofet 07-16-2009 01:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CasperImproved (Post 836242)
You have my curiosity now. What hole? And how did it happen?

Curious minds, and all that.

Bob

Quote:

Originally Posted by GB (Post 836253)
I think she means the hole in her cleaver, not a hole in her wall :wink:

Thraingaar, hang tight. We do have some knife experts here who will be able to give you excellent advice. I am sure they will answer your questions shortly.

LOL yup GB's got it right!! LOL @ casper (you bad boy!)

btw i use a chef's choice sharpner, a stone and a steel to hone and sharpen my knives.

Scotch 07-16-2009 02:02 PM

1 Attachment(s)
I have several Hattori HE knives in my collection, and I highly recommend them.

Check here: HATTORI Japanese Knife,Japanese Kitchen Knife,Japanese Chef's Knives.Com

Mark Webster 07-16-2009 05:07 PM

I have two sets of Henckels (4 star) that I use one set for work and the other I keep in my trunk if needed. My work set has been busy chopping and slicing for over 25 years and are still in great shape.There are many great knives out in todays market. Just make sure if you buy a Henckel or Wusthof that they are actually forged in Germany. Many stores may sell a Henckel or Wusthof and a seemingly discounts rate, but they were made someplace else. Check the stamp on the blade for country of origin. I have also started buying the Ken Onion Shun style and these knifes are fantastic. Please remember you truly get what you pay for, just like everything else today.

Rob Babcock 07-16-2009 05:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Thraingaar (Post 836232)
Hello all,
I am seeking help on a purchase of a new chef's knife.
I currently use a Global G-2 and (for the most part) it made it through school intact. I perfer the Japanese Gyuto knives with western style handles. I have narrowed my selection down to a few knives and am unsure where I should lean to and why. I know almost zero about the various makeup of the blades and all the carbon and steel ratings. Here's what I am looking at.
1. Hattori (HD-8) Damascus Series
2. Hiromot Tenmi-Jyuraku Damascus series
3. Misono UX10
Sharpening will be done as needed by a professional. I am looking for balance, edge retention and durablity to use professionally.
I am asking for any advice that can be given, including recommending other knives. Thanks.

I haven't had a chance to handle the new Damascus Hiromotos (presumably you're looking at JCK?) but they make great knives. Unless you simply must have suminagashi you might want to look at Hiromoto's Aogomi line.

The Hattori's are fine knives. If it were me I'd generally choose V-Gold 10 over the steel used in the Misono's, especially given Hattori's expertise in heat treating.

BTW, have you considered the Hattori FH series? Very nice knives.

Thraingaar 07-16-2009 08:33 PM

Thanks for the feedback so far, looks like a good start. While I don't have to have suminagashi, I would perfer it. They look to beautiful to me and for the price range I am looking at...Why not? If it's a nice blade at least. Someone told me today I should 'buck up' and look at the Tanaka. I don't know much about them at all, but at x3 the price I would need a pro to explain why I should spend that much. Thanks for the help!

Scotch 07-16-2009 08:51 PM

Tanaka knifes are well made and not terribly expensive:

eBay Store: Search results for Japanese tools metalmaster.

Thraingaar 07-16-2009 11:10 PM

The Tanaka I saw was on Epicurean Edge for $630 bucks. I actually didn't think of E-bay. :)

Constance 07-16-2009 11:23 PM

DH bought me the knife Rachel Rae used to use...(Santoku?)...and I love it. He has his own knives he uses.

CasperImproved 07-17-2009 12:19 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Constance (Post 836431)
DH bought me the knife Rachel Rae used to use...(Santoku?)...and I love it. He has his own knives he uses.


I think that's actually pretty cool. The fact you have your separate knives does define your unique spaces in the kitchen.

I also have wanted to buy that Santoku knife as it gets rave reviews (by non professionals), but I really can't justify since the chef knife I have now is quite capable.

Bob

Rob Babcock 07-17-2009 04:50 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Thraingaar (Post 836430)
The Tanaka I saw was on Epicurean Edge for $630 bucks. I actually didn't think of E-bay. :)

No need to resort to eBay if you don't want to- the Wa handles Tanaka's are pretty reasonable at ChefKnivesToGo.com, and you get free shipping. Their suminagashi blades are available in Blue #2 or VG-10 with good geometry and a keen age for well under $200 (although currently they list only the carbon Mark can probably get the V-Gold 10, and if not the two primary sellers on eBay are really solid).

Make no mistake, though...if I had the spare change I'd snag one of those high end, ironwood handled R2 Tanaka's in a heartbeat!

Thraingaar 07-17-2009 11:20 AM

Kazuyuki Tanaka : San Mai Damascus R2 powdered metallurgical (PM) stainless steel blade, Rc 62.
Tenmi-Jyuraku Damascus Series:VG-10 Cobalt steel
HD Series from Hattori: VG10 core cutting edge forged with 63 layered Nickel Damascus stainless steel blade.

I was all set on the Hattori until I read several reviews saying that the blade chips really easy and will take more maintence than it should. However, all those reviews said the knive is a dream to work with with superior balance and control.
That leaves me wishing the KD line was half the price :)
That left me ready to purchase the HIROMOTO. Except, due to the fact it's brand new, I can not find a review on it. Other Hiromoto knives get great reviews, but the blade composition is different on this one and I've heard from several sources that the Hittori is superior in the VG 10 process. So I am stumped again.
Now the Tanaka, I could swing the price, so that's not an issue. The issue is I really don't understand the nuances of the material uses to make the knives, and if it's really worth jumping up to the price point. At $600 That's really my limit I can spend as I was planning on upgrading a few of my other knives and get waterstones.
So I guess my question is, WHY is the Tanaka worth it? Or should I jump on one of the others? thanks again for all the info, you guys rock!

shalinee 07-17-2009 11:57 AM

Wow....that's a lot of knives I'm learning here. Scotch, You actually frighten me with so many sharp pointed knives that you have. I only have one....my favourite chopper/cleaver that I use for everything. Do you use all those knives all the time? They must have cost you a lot.

Rob Babcock 07-18-2009 03:56 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Thraingaar (Post 836552)
So I guess my question is, WHY is the Tanaka worth it? Or should I jump on one of the others? thanks again for all the info, you guys rock!

First, they run a great shop. Their work is first class all the way, by all reports. The ironwood handles are gorgeous with fantastic F&F, the cladding is etched nearly to Hattori KD standards and R2 is a tremendous steel. I've not been fortunate enough to use the uber-Tanaka, so take this with a grain of salt, but the reports of those who own them are glowing. If I had an extra $600 to drop on a knife right now it would definitely be the 240mm Ironwood Tanaka.

Scotch 07-18-2009 01:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Thraingaar (Post 836552)
... I was all set on the Hattori until I read several reviews saying that the blade chips really easy and will take more maintence than it should. However, all those reviews said the knive is a dream to work with with superior balance and control....

Hattori knives are no more prone to chipping, in my experience, than other Japanese kitchen knives. Japanese knives are more prone to chipping than German knives due to 1) the harder and more brittle steel they use and 2) the thinness of the blades and 3) the steep angles at which they are sharpened. But they do chip -- you cannot cut through even chicken bones with most Japanese kitchen knives. However, they are superior when it comes to slicing and chopping veggies and meats, etc.


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