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-   -   Simmering sauce... (http://www.discusscooking.com/forums/f32/simmering-sauce-66682.html)

GoGreyhounds 08-31-2010 12:52 AM

Simmering sauce...
 
I've been trying to get a really long simmer (6 hours+) on my San Marzano sauce, but after about 3, all the water boils out and I'm left with overly thick sauce. I've tried adding water but it doesn't "mix" well, and I end up with water and tomatos.

Do I cover it? What do you guys do?

DaveSoMD 08-31-2010 04:53 AM

Any particular reason you are going for 6+ hours? Normally you simmer to reduce the liquid and concentrate the flavors and ingredients. You can either reduce you time or put on the lid slighlty off the pot to let the steam condence and run back in, but you may still find that you have to stir back in the condensed water again.

TATTRAT 08-31-2010 09:30 PM

seems like way overkill. Things like demi require that kinda time, but not a tomato sauce, imo.

Once a sauce is reduced to the desired consistency, pull it. Only thing I can think off if you are looking for a 6hour label, but done after 3, cut the heat in half?

GoGreyhounds 08-31-2010 09:44 PM

I've heard that the longer you let it simmer on low heat, the more the flavors blend and the richer it tastes. Also, what I really like to do is make a decent sized portion and have sauce with both lunch and dinner. So if I make it at noon I'd like it to "last" until dinner, and hopefully get "better". Is that how it works? lol

Andy M. 09-01-2010 08:15 AM

There's a point of no return. If 2 hours of simmering is good, 6 hours isn't three times better.

You're dealing with veggies here. Tomato, onion, etc. They're cooked to death quickly. Make a big batch and freeze it in meal-sized containers for later use.

If you add meats, there is some benefit to cooking longer to extract the flavors from the meats and their bones if any.

Zhizara 09-03-2010 04:52 PM

When I'm trying for a long cooking time, I turn the heat off for an hour or so and just let it sit on the burner with the lid on tight. Then, I turn it back on let it come back to a simmer and again turn it off and let it sit on the burner. Kind of like a human crock pot.

Andy M. 09-03-2010 05:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Zhizara (Post 918073)
When I'm trying for a long cooking time, I turn the heat off for an hour or so and just let it sit on the burner with the lid on tight. Then, I turn it back on let it come back to a simmer and again turn it off and let it sit on the burner. Kind of like a human crock pot.

What do you think this accomplishes?

Zhizara 09-03-2010 06:43 PM

It lets the flavors steep together without boiling off all the liquid and cooking your vegetables past the mush point.

msmofet 09-04-2010 12:17 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Zhizara (Post 918105)
It lets the flavors steep together without boiling off all the liquid and cooking your vegetables past the mush point.

It may also be growing bacteria.

Chef Dave 10-05-2010 11:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Andy M. (Post 917619)
There's a point of no return. If 2 hours of simmering is good, 6 hours isn't three times better.

Well said!

:chef:


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