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Old 12-18-2006, 08:40 PM   #11
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Are Armour or Bryon brands "natural lard"?

Quote:
Originally Posted by skilletlicker
Are Armour or Bryon brands "natural lard," or is that a term you reserve for pork fat that has been rendered naturally in the way mdowod's grandma's great-grandmother might have done. I have read that such lard is still available but not a mass marketed product.
The one-pound block of Armour Lard that I have in my freezer lists the following ingredients on the package
Quote:
LARD AND HYDROGENATED LARD, BHA, PROPLY GALLATE AND CITRIC ACID ADDED TO HELP PROTECT FLAVOR
Armour lard is not "natural lard", since it contains hyrogenated lard and other chemical preservatives and additives.

I don't know Goodweed's opinion, but in mine, "natural lard" is pork fat that has been rendered naturally. If you purchase it, it should just say lard. Not "lard and hydrogenated lard and other chemical krap", just lard.
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Old 12-18-2006, 09:57 PM   #12
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I pulled my 32 oz. tub of Bryan Lard out of the ice box. While there is no spot on the the label that says Ingredients there is this list of letters that may or not mean anything real.
  • PROPYLENE GLYCOL, BUTYLATED HYDROXYANOSOLE, GLYSERYL
  • ... and a whole bunch of other stuff.
I think we have moved beyond the question posed by mdowod and her grandmothers cookies and I offer my apologies if the topic of the conversation has been temporarily changed.
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Old 12-18-2006, 10:15 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by subfuscpersona
... If you purchase it, it should just say lard. Not "lard and hydrogenated lard and other chemical krap", just lard.
Yup. Goodweed's version of natural lard is the same as yours, hardend fat renderd from pork fat, with no preservatives, chemicals, hydrogenated oils, or anything else added.

I know the guy personally, and he usually does his homework before responding to a post.

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Old 12-18-2006, 10:23 PM   #14
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Please post your Grandmothers recipe using the lard
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Old 12-19-2006, 02:35 PM   #15
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I really liked the episode of Good Eats on pie crust, he goes a bit into why lard makes a flakey crust:
I Pie Transcript
(link to the transcript of the episode)
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Old 01-14-2012, 06:32 PM   #16
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Grandma's recipe

I also have a cookie recipe from my husband's grandmother which calls for lard. I used Crisco instead, but the dough is not thick enough. Any comments of suggestions would be appreciated.
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Old 01-14-2012, 10:32 PM   #17
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I remember when we brought the pigs to slaughter, we always got back along with the meat for the freezer, large tins (about five pounds) of fat marked Lard on the outside in black paint. And we brought back the tins from last year and gave them back to the butcher. In the winter one would sit outside the kitchen door on a high shelf, and in the summer it sat in the well in the summer kitchen to stay cold and solid. I remember measuring a level cup for baking in the old tin cup that had the markings on the outside. There were measuring cups for baking, and others for canning. The canning ones never came into the house kitchen. Not one drop ever got wasted. When we got down to less than a cup, then you would use your fingers to wipe around the tin and use it to grease cake pans and scrape off you fingers for frying. Most of that lard came off the back of the hog. Hence, "living high off the hog".
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Old 01-15-2012, 12:00 AM   #18
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I have a tub of Esskay Lard in my fridge. It contains Lard w/ BHA and BHT added to protect freshness. No trans fats. Not hydrogenated.
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Old 01-17-2012, 09:18 AM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by subfuscpersona View Post
The one-pound block of Armour Lard that I have in my freezer lists the following ingredients on the package


Armour lard is not "natural lard", since it contains hyrogenated lard and other chemical preservatives and additives.

I don't know Goodweed's opinion, but in mine, "natural lard" is pork fat that has been rendered naturally. If you purchase it, it should just say lard. Not "lard and hydrogenated lard and other chemical krap", just lard.
I agree that lard should be pork fat and nothing more. However, since I can't find any true lard locally, and since the Armor product is a blend of natural lard, and the other stuff, it has less of the other stuff per unit volume that does Crisco, or other shortenings, and it gives me better results in the recipes I use it in.

If I could get my hands on pure lard, that would be my ultimate choice.

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Old 01-17-2012, 09:25 AM   #20
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Crisco will work fine...I promise.
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