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Old 12-10-2006, 01:20 PM   #1
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Lard vs Crisco

I have my grandma's recipe for Farmer cookies that uses lard, does anyone know whether Crisco can be substituted in baking with the same results>

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Old 12-10-2006, 01:35 PM   #2
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My experiences with baked goods is that it only comes out with similar results if you use the ingredients as stated. That is, if it says butter, use butter. That's not to say something won't come out good, but it won't be the same.

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Old 12-10-2006, 03:24 PM   #3
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Mdowod hello and welcome to DC. When I am using a receipe I generally stick to the ingredients that it asks for.
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Old 12-11-2006, 11:02 AM   #4
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Your flavor would definitely change as lard emparts it's own flavor. If you are looking to make the change in hopes of making a healthier cookie you may be making a mistake. Crisco is a Hyrogenated vegetable oil which could be loaded with those banned in New York City trans fatty acids.
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Old 12-11-2006, 11:30 AM   #5
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The mass marketed lards are also hydrogenated. I suspect you'll be satisfied with the Crisco results. Maybe butter even more.
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Old 12-11-2006, 11:37 AM   #6
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Natural lard is more healthy than hydrogenated fats, such as Crisco, and butter. It is lower in saturated fat than the other two. It also creates a wonderfully flaky pie-crust and is good in many patries.

But as with all things, though the body requires saturated fats for good nutrition, it only needs a very small amount. It's like the trace mineral of fats.

As for using shortening to replace lard in cooking, it's easier to find in the supermarkets, is generally less expensive due to mass production, and is absolutely neutral in flavor. When used properly in a recipe, it's pretty hard to distinguish the end quality between vegetable shrotening and lard.

Either will produce a great pie crust if the dough is made properly.

I use lard simply because it's a healthier fat than any of the trans-fats. But then again, I use butter in a lot of my cooking as well, just in small amounts.

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Old 12-11-2006, 12:42 PM   #7
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Goodweed, I always read your posts with great interest, often thinking you are agreeing, but after walking away I'm never quite so sure. We do seem to agree that mdowod ought to try Crisco in grandma's cookies, but after that, I just might not be smart enough to distinguish, in your comments, the differences between agreement, skepticism, and mocking; mind you, I don't object to any of them.

Are Armour or Bryon brands "natural lard," or is that a term you reserve for pork fat that has been rendered naturally in the way mdowod's grandma's great-grandmother might have done. I have read that such lard is still available but not a mass marketed product.

Someone will soon profit from a book titled "Saturated Fats vrs. Trans Fats for Dummies."
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Old 12-11-2006, 01:23 PM   #8
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Thanx everyone for the info, I have decided not to change the original recipe cause these cookies are the best, very heavy cookie that is so addicting, THANX AGAIN TO ALL
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Old 12-11-2006, 02:00 PM   #9
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Glad you've gotten some answers, mdowod! I'm going to move your question to our baking forum, so others may see it, too.

Welcome to DC!
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Old 12-11-2006, 02:26 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by skilletlicker
Goodweed, I always read your posts with great interest, often thinking you are agreeing, but after walking away I'm never quite so sure. We do seem to agree that mdowod ought to try Crisco in grandma's cookies, but after that, I just might not be smart enough to distinguish, in your comments, the differences between agreement, skepticism, and mocking; mind you, I don't object to any of them.

Are Armour or Bryon brands "natural lard," or is that a term you reserve for pork fat that has been rendered naturally in the way mdowod's grandma's great-grandmother might have done. I have read that such lard is still available but not a mass marketed product.

Someone will soon profit from a book titled "Saturated Fats vrs. Trans Fats for Dummies."
Nah, I'm not disagreeing with you , but rather supporting your view. I can't say whether the brands you listed are naturally rendered or not, and really didn't know that most comercial lard is hydrogenated. But if it is, the hydrogenation is the culprit that creates the bad blood chemistry.

And no, I generally try not to be sarcastic. So, if you ever have questions about my comments, feel free to ask either in the topic, or by pm.

And just for the record, I usually agree with your posts as well. I just try to flesh them out a bit. It's my nature. I can't help it.

Seeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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