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Old 04-15-2006, 06:41 AM   #11
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Whats the difference between a city and a country ham? This sounds like a line for a good joke, but I honestly dont know the difference.
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Old 04-15-2006, 10:07 AM   #12
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My parents make a Czech recipe from leftover ham that I can only give you phonetically - "Fleetchkee".

It's a really great way to use up small amounts of leftover ham, although now that I'm married to a man who doesn't eat "mammals", I make it with cubed turkey kielbasa sausage, & it comes out just as good.

Basically, you just cook a package of egg noodles about a minute less than you normally would & drain. Then make a basic medium white sauce, adding a cup or more of grated cheddar cheese to it. Combine the noodles, sauce, & as much cubed ham as you want & turn it all into a greased baking dish. Sprinkle the top with some dried seasoned breadcrumbs (like Progresso, etc.), & bake in a 350-degree oven until heated through & the top is just starting to brown a little & get a bit crusty.
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Old 04-15-2006, 10:16 AM   #13
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breezy, my mil, a slovak, used to make something similar. it was delicious. thanks for the suggestion and info.

ambuh, i would use some to make potato and kale soup, or a ham and bean soup.

i also like to chop ham, and mix it with mashed potatoes, mashed turnips, and chopped (boiled) cabbage, then top it with shredded cheddar cheese, and put it under the broiler to melt. it just kinda makes a tasty, rib-sticking glop.
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Old 04-15-2006, 10:45 AM   #14
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Thanks BT and BC, both your recipes sound very good (comfort food, yum!)
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Old 04-15-2006, 12:02 PM   #15
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Hi Amber,

There are what are called city and country hams.

A city ham is generally wet-cured. It is either soaked in brine or more often, today, injected with a brine solution.

It is the most common ham found in most meat departments. Being in Maine my guess is that you usually find only the city hams there.

All of the ham you find in the deli is city ham.

The country ham is dry cured and aged over a fairly long period.

They are quite salty, and the meat is tougher. They need to be soaked for a day or two before cooking.

Basically it is a southern dish.

Love to take the slices, which we can buy here in VA, fry them and make red eye gravy.

Many folks for parties and such take slices of the country ham and put them on biscuits. Can add a bit of mustard if you like, but they are great just by themselves.

It is a totally different experience than a city ham.

We were raised above the Mason-Dixon line but have lived for many years below that.

And appreciate both types of ham.

But there is a real difference between the two.
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Old 04-15-2006, 01:16 PM   #16
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shave your ham very thinly with a serrated bread knife. fry as is if you're cooking bacon. let it cook as is in teflon or grease your pan if not. great with some syrup!
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Old 04-15-2006, 02:00 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BreezyCooking
My parents make a Czech recipe from leftover ham that I can only give you phonetically - "Fleetchkee".

It's a really great way to use up small amounts of leftover ham, although now that I'm married to a man who doesn't eat "mammals", I make it with cubed turkey kielbasa sausage, & it comes out just as good.

Basically, you just cook a package of egg noodles about a minute less than you normally would & drain. Then make a basic medium white sauce, adding a cup or more of grated cheddar cheese to it. Combine the noodles, sauce, & as much cubed ham as you want & turn it all into a greased baking dish. Sprinkle the top with some dried seasoned breadcrumbs (like Progresso, etc.), & bake in a 350-degree oven until heated through & the top is just starting to brown a little & get a bit crusty.
Sounds great Breezy. I like the bread crumb idea. Looks similar? to this:

Schinkenfleckel (Ham and Noodle Casserole - Austria)
1 (8 ounce) package egg noodles, cooked and drained
1/2 pound cooked ham, ground
1 cup cottage cheese
1 cup dairy sour cream
2 eggs, beaten
1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
Salt, to taste
Freshly-ground black pepper
1/2 cup grated Parmesan cheese

In a large mixing bowl, combine cooked noodles, ground ham, cottage cheese, sour cream, eggs, Worcestershire sauce, salt and pepper. Stir gently until well mixed. Spoon noodle mixture into a lightly greased 2-quart casserole dish. Sprinkle Parmesan cheese on top. Bake at 350 degrees F for 20 to 25 minutes, or until heated through.


More hammy thoughts:

Add diced cooked ham to fettuccine Alfredo

Cold macaroni salad - ham, relish, olives, mayo & onions

Spaghetti carbonara

Ham croquettes

Scalloped potatoes, Ham & chives

Wrap ham around an asparagus spear, bake drizzled with white sauce

I have a very old recipe I saved from a mag eons ago -- from memory:

Ham is wrapped around two broccoli spears (facing in opposite directions with florettes facing out), then wrapped w a slice of cheese, then a cresent roll --- the florettes peeking out at both ends. Line the ham roll-ups in a baking dish, drizzle with white sauce, and bake. If you would like the recipe, let me know & I'll get my loose leaf down off the shelf.
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Old 04-15-2006, 02:47 PM   #18
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Auntdot, thank you so much for your explanation of city vs country ham. I guess dry cured means it is hung to dry for a long time sort of like procuitto? (sp?). I bought a smoked butt portion and it certainly does look as though it was wet-cured. Thanks again for your wealth of information

Luvs food, your idea to shave the ham thin and then fry it up is one idea I thought of too, but to add syrup sounds like a great idea! When I make breakfast sausage or bacon, I always add syrup.

Mish, your recipe for the broccoli florets sounds like a good one, though I would skip the white sauce (not to keen on white sauce). If you cannot find your recipe, I would guess what I should do is par-boil or par-steam the broccoli first? Wrap the ham and cheese around them, and then roll that up into the cresent rolls and baked until the rolls are brown and cheese has melted? Thanks for your ideas.
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Old 04-15-2006, 02:53 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by amber
Auntdot, thank you so much for your explanation of city vs country ham. I guess dry cured means it is hung to dry for a long time sort of like procuitto? (sp?). I bought a smoked butt portion and it certainly does look as though it was wet-cured. Thanks again for your wealth of information

Luvs food, your idea to shave the ham thin and then fry it up is one idea I thought of too, but to add syrup sounds like a great idea! When I make breakfast sausage or bacon, I always add syrup.

Mish, your recipe for the broccoli florets sounds like a good one, though I would skip the white sauce (not to keen on white sauce). If you cannot find your recipe, I would guess what I should do is par-boil or par-steam the broccoli first? Wrap the ham and cheese around them, and then roll that up into the cresent rolls and baked until the rolls are brown and cheese has melted? Thanks for your ideas.
You're very welcome, amber. That sounds 'about right. Let the broccoli spears/florettes peek out of the roll on both sides. They look pretty all lined up. 'Sparagus should work too. I may go drag down that loose leaf yet and go thru it. Thanks for inspiring me.
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Old 04-17-2006, 11:17 AM   #20
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FRIED POTATOS AND HAM

Peel and cut up red potatoes (Chunk theml)
Cut ham in chunks as well
Dice up a small onion and bellpepper
Slice mushrooms.
lemon
Put oil in a skillet (enough to fry, do not drown) fry your potatoes until a tender crisp. Remove for a minute or two long enough to fry your ham your onions, bellpeppers and mushrooms. When they are done to your desired tenderness or crispyness then add the potatoes. Mix them around for a min ute or two to join the flavors together. Add a drop or two of lemon Remove from heat and place in a dish. Goes good with breakfast or brunch
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