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Old 08-23-2006, 04:43 PM   #21
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VeraBlue,

What is in the Libby's can of pumpkin is a Dickinson Field squash which belongs to a species known as Cucurbita moschata, this is the butternut squash family, not a pumpkin family. Pumpkins are of the Cucurbita pepo family.

Nothing illegal or unethical about it, it is government sanctioned, approved
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Old 08-23-2006, 04:59 PM   #22
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the pumpkin spice oatmeal is a grrrrrrreat idea!
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Old 08-23-2006, 05:20 PM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bethzaring
VeraBlue,

What is in the Libby's can of pumpkin is a Dickinson Field squash which belongs to a species known as Cucurbita moschata, this is the butternut squash family, not a pumpkin family. Pumpkins are of the Cucurbita pepo family.

Nothing illegal or unethical about it, it is government sanctioned, approved
All pumpkins are squashes.

It seems like we've gotten into semantics here. According to the Libby's site, it's pure pumpkin, a dickinson..as you stated. According to the pumpkin patch website, it states that all pumpkins are squashes. It also lists the dickinson field as a pumpkin, genus and species excluded, but a pumpkin, nevertheless.

I began this thread out of a love of pumpkin...the kind I cook with, and all it's different varieties. I'm going to keep to my original opinion that pumpkin is what is in the Libby's can, knowing that all pumpkins are squashes. I've checked two different websites and I don't see how anything I've already said is incorrect.

Now, if you'd like to tell us about your favourite pumpkin gig, I'm sure we'd all love to hear about it. I know I would...but I just don't see the squash argument going anywhere.
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Old 08-23-2006, 05:32 PM   #24
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Hi Vera
Just to lighten the thread... can I say that I really HATE pumpkins?!!!
When in Australia I swear that if I get offered another side dish of pumpkin or pumpkin soup, I swear I'll boak!
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Old 08-23-2006, 05:46 PM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ishbel
if I get offered another side dish of pumpkin or pumpkin soup, I swear I'll boak!
Ishbel, I never heard that expression before, but the meaning is perfectly clear!

BethZaring, that is a beautiful harvest of Butternut Squash! Wow! You're quite a farmer.
In the south they call all kinds of winter squash pumpkin. And speaking of Libby's Pie Pumpkin, the recipe on their label for pumpkin pie is the best, I think.

Here is my Grandma Snarr’s Pumpkin Bread:

2 2/3 cups granulated sugar
4 eggs; beaten
2/3 cup margarine
2 cups pumpkin
3 1/3 cups flour
1/2 teaspoon baking powder
2 teaspoon baking soda
1 1/2 teaspoon Salt
1 teaspoon Cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon cloves
2/3 cups water; room temperature
2/3 cups nuts; chopped
2/3 cup raisin

Cream sugar and shortening thoroughly. Add eggs, pumpkin and water; mix well. Sift and measure flour, add all the dry ingredients, and sift into pumpkin mixture. Stir in raisins and nuts. Turn into 2 greased and floured loaf pans. Bake at 350 degrees for one hour or until done. May take 5 or 10 minutes more. Cool 10 minutes in pans. Let stand a while before cutting. Freezes well.
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Old 08-23-2006, 05:50 PM   #26
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Constance - it's an old Scots (Lallans) word meaning 'to heave' 'to induce to vomit'...!!!!

VeraB - I hope you don't mind me lightening the mood - I thought you'd started a perfectly innocuous thread that seems to have become bogged down in the detail!
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Old 08-23-2006, 05:57 PM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ishbel
Constance - it's an old Scots (Lallans) word meaning 'to heave' 'to induce to vomit'...!!!!

VeraB - I hope you don't mind me lightening the mood - I thought you'd started a perfectly innocuous thread that seems to have become bogged down in the detail!
Thank you Ishbel, indeed the urge to 'boak' was coming down heavily on all the details, indeed.

What a pity you don't care for pumpkin. Should you find yourself in the states in autumn, may I suggest you have many apple pies, instead?
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Old 08-23-2006, 06:56 PM   #28
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Hey, VeraBlue, to me it is not semantics, to me they are very different fruits. I found a good description of the difference between pumpkins and squash. If a person goes to the grocery store to buy a squash to make a pumpkin pie from scratch, they will have a much better pie if they buy a butternut squash, not a pumpkin, because remember, Libby puts butternut squash in their pumpkin cans.

Q. What is the difference between a pumpkin and a squash? I need to know so I can impress all of my ghostly friends on Halloween.
A. The genetic history of the pumpkin is so intertwined with the squash and the gourd that it's sometimes difficult to tell them apart. Generally speaking a pumpkin is something you carve, a squash is something you cook and a gourd is something you look at. Though it's really not that simple, it's also not that difficult. The answer is in the stem.
Pumpkins and squashes and gourds all belong to the same genetic family - Cucurbita. Within that family are several species or subgroups - Cucurbita pepo, Cucurbita maxima and Cucurbita moschata.


The pepo species is usually recognized as the true pumpkin. Varieties within this group have bright orange skin and hard, woody, distinctly furrowed stems. But the group also includes gourds, vegetable marrow, Pattypan summer squash, scallop summer squash, gray and black zucchini and summer crookneck squash.


The maxima species also contains varieties that produce pumpkin-like fruit but the skin is usually more yellow than orange and the stems are soft and spongy or corky, without ridges and without an enlargement next to the fruit. They don't really make good handles for jack-o'-lanterns. Varieties such as Atlantic Giant, Big Max and Show King are often listed as pumpkins but are more properly called pumpkin-squash or squash- type pumpkins. Other members of the maxima group are Hubbard squashes, banana squashes, buttercup squashes and turban squashes - in short, most autumn and winter squash.


Finally, there's the moschata species. Varieties in this group are usually long and oblong instead of round and have tan rather than orange skin. The stems are deeply ridged and enlarged next to the fruit. Ironically, a member of this group is used for much of the canned pumpkin sold in this country. Other non-pumpkin members include the squash-like cushaw, winter crookneck squash and butternut squash.

http://plantanswers.tamu.edu/web.html

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Old 08-23-2006, 07:59 PM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Toots
This is a great idea - do you use canned pumpkin and just stir it in as the oatmeal is thickening up?

I am also a pumpkin lover!
I make my oatmeal in the microwave so after it has finished cooking (with the spice and some sweetner), I stir in some big spoonfuls of canned pumpkin, a little more milk and heat it up again.

There's not many breakfasts that are healthier than this.
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Old 08-23-2006, 08:04 PM   #30
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Halfbaked,
Now that autumn is just about here, I'll be preparing hot cereal again, every day for my customers. I like your idea and have a feeling it will be a big seller.

I think I'll make the sign read "halfbaked pumpkin spice oatmeal" Since I serve all the hot cereals with toppings, I think I'll push this one with the almond granola..
I hope you approve.
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