"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Health, Nutrition and Special Diets
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 08-21-2012, 04:31 PM   #1
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,408
Carb Absorption from Marinades

SO is attempting the Atkins again so I have to re-acquaint myself with the rules. Rummaging through the book tells me a lot but I haven't found the answer to the following question.

If you use a high carb food item in a marinade, how much of its carbs do you count in the finished product.

For example, Hoot's grilled shrimp calls for a marinade which includes a cup of beer. It would seem to me that 99% of the beer and its resident carbs remains in the dish when you take the shrimp out of the marinade to grill them.

Does anyone know any different? Is there some magical carb absorption formula that involves the hypotenuse of the shrimp times the square root of the cosine of the beer bottle, or something?
__________________

__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-21-2012, 04:48 PM   #2
Wine Guy
 
Steve Kroll's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Twin Cities, Minnesota
Posts: 5,419
Well...

How about this? Measure the marinade before and after adding the food. Take the difference and divide it among the number of servings in the recipe.

I don't know if it would work, but you have to admit it sounds logical.
__________________

__________________
Steve Kroll is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-21-2012, 05:01 PM   #3
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,408
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Kroll View Post
Well...

How about this? Measure the marinade before and after adding the food. Take the difference and divide it among the number of servings in the recipe.

I don't know if it would work, but you have to admit it sounds logical.
That would be relatively easy if beer was the only liquid ingredient, but there is also oil and vinegar. What if they get absorbed at different rates? How much drips off on the grill? ...or gets burned off during cooking?
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-21-2012, 05:49 PM   #4
Sous Chef
 
no mayonnaise's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 553
I don't think it'll absorb any carbs. To my knowledge, carbs don't filter in/out of cells via osmosis, and they don't otherwise bond to foods.
If it absorbs any carbs, it'll be such an insignificant amount that I can't imagine it even impacting someone on Atkins. You may get some excess marinade (and thus, carbs) that sticks to the food, but I'd guess most would drip off during cooking anyway, resulting in insignificant amounts. I doubt you'd get even an entire sip's worth of beer out of the entire meal. My guess is the beer's role is to function as an acid, similar to lemon or lime juice.
__________________
no mayonnaise is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-21-2012, 05:55 PM   #5
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,408
Quote:
Originally Posted by no mayonnaise View Post
I don't think it'll absorb any carbs. To my knowledge, carbs don't filter in/out of cells via osmosis, and they don't otherwise bond to foods.
If it absorbs any carbs, it'll be such an insignificant amount that I can't imagine it even impacting someone on Atkins. You may get some excess marinade (and thus, carbs) that sticks to the food, but I'd guess most would drip off during cooking anyway, resulting in insignificant amounts. I doubt you'd get more an entire sip's worth of beer out of the entire meal. My guess is the beer's role is to function as an acid, similar to lemon or lime juice.

That's my opinion as well. I was hoping someone with more knowledge than I could provide confirmation. Thanks.
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-21-2012, 09:58 PM   #6
Ogress Supreme
 
PrincessFiona60's Avatar
Site Administrator
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Wyoming
Posts: 36,312
Simple carb, often added to marinades...sugar in some form. How much sweet do you taste when you eat the finished product?

Take 2 raw potato sticks. Put one in cold salt water, put the other in cold sugar water, use the same volumes of water and salt/sugar. After 15 minutes take them out...the salt water potato is still crisp, if not crisper than it was. The sugar water potato is almost limp...the sugar pulls water out of the potato.
__________________
PrincessFiona60 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-21-2012, 10:01 PM   #7
Honey Badger
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 2,287
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
SO is attempting the Atkins again so I have to re-acquaint myself with the rules. Rummaging through the book tells me a lot but I haven't found the answer to the following question.

If you use a high carb food item in a marinade, how much of its carbs do you count in the finished product.

For example, Hoot's grilled shrimp calls for a marinade which includes a cup of beer. It would seem to me that 99% of the beer and its resident carbs remains in the dish when you take the shrimp out of the marinade to grill them.

Does anyone know any different? Is there some magical carb absorption formula that involves the hypotenuse of the shrimp times the square root of the cosine of the beer bottle, or something?
Andy,

My better half is on the Atkins diet again to. Does your SO have that little pocket booklet? Or any of the Atkins books, that's including the cookbook?

I'm thinking the carbs will be grilled off the shrimp enough that it wouldn't even matter. It's not like your using a whole gallon of the stuff. On the other hand the diet says no carbs. Doesn't beer have carbs, it's made from yeast isn't it? Look who doesn't drink beer. <-----

I would think to count the carbs for a dish, count them in as the total amount of each serving. That diet has me punching #'s to. Sorry I'm not that much help to you. Seems to me that whatever I might suggest as a veggie that's healthy with no carbs actually does have them. It's making it hard to figure out what's ok, what's not. Some days I don't even want to cook. They can't have anything. Kind of takes away the joy of cooking.

Munky.
__________________
If your with me that's great. If not. Get out of my way.
Chef Munky is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-21-2012, 10:16 PM   #8
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,408
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chef Munky View Post
...It's making it hard to figure out what's ok, what's not. Some days I don't even want to cook. They can't have anything. Kind of takes away the joy of cooking.

Munky.
You've got that right!
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-22-2012, 04:16 AM   #9
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Kent in the U.K (the garden of England)
Posts: 211
Quote:
Originally Posted by PrincessFiona60 View Post
Simple carb, often added to marinades...sugar in some form. How much sweet do you taste when you eat the finished product?

Take 2 raw potato sticks. Put one in cold salt water, put the other in cold sugar water, use the same volumes of water and salt/sugar. After 15 minutes take them out...the salt water potato is still crisp, if not crisper than it was. The sugar water potato is almost limp...the sugar pulls water out of the potato.
Good morning PrincessFiona, I don't quite understand that about the sugar and salt, if you want to degorge/remove the moisture from things like cucumber, egg plant and vegetables for pickling, you sprinkle them with salt. Is it because the water becomes a brine that the process doesn't work?

Brilliant the things you learn on here
__________________
acerbicacid is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-22-2012, 04:55 AM   #10
Ogress Supreme
 
PrincessFiona60's Avatar
Site Administrator
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Wyoming
Posts: 36,312
Quote:
Originally Posted by acerbicacid View Post
Good morning PrincessFiona, I don't quite understand that about the sugar and salt, if you want to degorge/remove the moisture from things like cucumber, egg plant and vegetables for pickling, you sprinkle them with salt. Is it because the water becomes a brine that the process doesn't work?

Brilliant the things you learn on here
Sugar is hygroscopic, it absorbs water, but does not try to give any of that water back. Salt on the other hand will take the water with it, in and out until it reaches a concentration of salt that is the same in the water and in the potato.

So putting the potato in sugar water (or any sweet marinade) the sugary (carb laden) is more likely to just coat the surface of the potato/food as it pulls moisture out of the food.

Using a salty marinade, the salt helps in pulling the marinade into the food.

In purging cucumbers for pickles and eggplant, you put salt straight onto the food, the salt works to draw the water out to balance the concentration of salt on the inside and outside.

I hope some of this makes sense.
__________________

__________________
PrincessFiona60 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:25 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.