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Old 09-10-2010, 05:01 PM   #1
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Nutritional value of veg?

I like to steam/stirfry my veggies.

I read that some of the nutrients are lost to cooking.

Take broccoli for example if i steam my florets for 6 minutes will there be any vitamin c left ?

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Old 09-10-2010, 05:11 PM   #2
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100 grams of raw broccoli contains 93.7 gr. of vitamin C.
100 grams of cooked broccoli contains 64.9 gr. of vitamin C.

That's just the tip of the iceberg. There are a host of nutrients to consider from a number of different veggies. Some lose more than others and some nutrients are made available for the body to use through cooking.

It also matters how much you cook a veggie.
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Old 09-10-2010, 08:54 PM   #3
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Steaming and stir-frying are the best methods to avoid loss of nutrients when cooking veggies. Boiling in water causes the greatest loss and people are encouraged to save the water and use for soups or something else (keep for later by storing in refrigerator).
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Old 09-10-2010, 09:07 PM   #4
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guess I should ask: how about roasting and grilling? My guess is they are pretty ok methods.
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Old 09-10-2010, 09:47 PM   #5
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guess I should ask: how about roasting and grilling? My guess is they are pretty ok methods.
Now, though I wouldn't know the nutritional value of roasted veg, I must say how scummily delicious root veg are, all caramelised in an unctious melee in a roasting tin pulled out of a hot oven. :drool:

Steaming will always retain most vits and trace elements of veg. Though again, grilled, even fried red or green tomatoes just can't be beaten when served part of a full English breakfast on a cold and wet Saturday morning.
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Old 09-12-2010, 07:15 PM   #6
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When i was an apprentice chef i spent a few months in a hospital kitchen and the veg was often way overcooked. Green beans were yellow and mushy and the carrots you could eat threw a straw.

When veg are over over cooked is there any nutrition left in them as above ?
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Old 09-12-2010, 07:26 PM   #7
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[QUOTE=acc2020;919643

When veg are over over cooked is there any nutrition left in them as above ?[/QUOTE]

No. Except maybe for roughage. 0_o
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Old 09-13-2010, 10:52 AM   #8
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Now, ... I must say how scummily delicious root veg are, all caramelised in an unctious melee in a roasting tin pulled out of a hot oven. :drool:

...again, grilled, even fried red or green tomatoes just can't be beaten when served part of a full English breakfast on a cold and wet Saturday morning.
Absolutely!!! my thoughts exactly. (and cooking does help release much of tomato's goodness for the body)
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Old 09-13-2010, 12:29 PM   #9
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Something that's marvellous about onions is when studded with a 3 or 4 cloves, and boiled gently and then eaten, a boiled onion has such benefit to a snotting cold that in a very short time, you'll feel miles better. Is it for the nutrition? I don't know. But said onion sure has some magic inside.
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Old 09-13-2010, 01:02 PM   #10
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Onions contain Thiosulfinates which exhibit antimicrobial properties. Onion is effective against many bacteria including Bacillus subtilis, Salmonella, and E. coli. Onion is not as potent as garlic since the sulfur compounds in onion are only about one-quarter the level found in garlic.

Early American settlers used wild onions to treat colds, coughs, and asthma, and to repel insects. In Chinese medicine, onions have been used to treat angina, coughs, bacterial infections, and breathing problems.
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