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Old 02-21-2008, 10:30 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by Jeekinz View Post
Dude....2 years for a chicken breast? Paleeeze. There's no way I would touch that. It must taste like shoe leather. Two months I could deal with, NOT 2 years!
Actually, Jeekinz ... chicken breasts vacuum sealed for 2 years could taste fresher, and have less texture damage, than some just tossed into the freezer in the store package for a couple or so months!

Oh, and if the seal was not 100% - you would see ice crystals inside the package.
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Old 02-21-2008, 10:46 PM   #22
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With the week-end coming up I won't have time to cook the chicken, but when I cook it next wk I'll post on here to let you know how it taste. I'm hoping it will be fine. Faye
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Old 02-21-2008, 11:00 PM   #23
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Of topic. One time my freezer got defrosted. I don't know how it happened, but I came home at night and my wife told me about. So i went to work, a roast, a turkey 3 or 4 chickens, I don't remember what else, but I was cookin all night.
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Old 02-21-2008, 11:12 PM   #24
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LOL - yeah CharlieD ... that's why I put that "qualifier" in there ... If it has been frozen all of this time ... wouldn't want someone to say something like, "Oh thanks - our electricity went out for 6 weeks and wanted to make sure it was safe to eat because it was vacuum packaged ..."
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Old 02-21-2008, 11:53 PM   #25
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Anything in it's original packaging and frozen is only good for a couple of months and that is pushing it. And when I say good, I am referring to the quality. I despise freezer burnt products more than anything and it is quite a nasty taste. (One of the reasons I bought a foodsaver.) Any meat you buy you don't intend on eating within the first month of purchase, vaccumm pack it!!! I would eat chicken or any other meat that has been vaccumm packed over 2 years old. It taste as good as it would if I were to have thawed and cooked it in the first month of freezing it.

Sorry, not trying to rehash anything.. just my .10.... No offense to anyone... I understand Jeeks reasoning too!

Charlie D... that had to be one heck of a banquet!!!! I will have to keep that in mind if it ever happens to me.
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Old 02-22-2008, 07:12 AM   #26
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Originally Posted by Jeekinz View Post
GB, there are alot of 'IF's' in that post. That's why I refrain from giving the OK. I realize the bird in the sink is not the "mainstream" way to defrost, but that's what I do.
Actually, I'd be willing to bet that it is the mainstream way that folks defrost chicken. It is not the recommended way, but it is not all that risky if done properly.

Properly means thawing it only until it begins to become pliable but still has ice crystals through it. This means, basically, thawing thicken parts.

Whole chickens or Turkeys can be thawed in water. This is done solely to speed up the process as water is a much better conductor of heat than air.

GB is right about the 40 degree rule, but it has to be at least 2 hrs above that before any problems can start.

The reason it isn't recommended is because many people won't do it properly. They will put in in the sink, go to work, and come home 9 hours later. Or they take the chicken out the night before, and go to bed. That is just asking for trouble.

While many talk about thawing in the refrigerator, I don't see many doing it. Mainly, it is a timing issue. You have to remember to take it out of the freezer a couple of days before you want to cook it. How many busy people really plan their meals days in advance?

Just to be clear, thawing in the refrigerator is safer because there is no opportunity for doing it improperly. Thawing in the sink can be done properly, but requires the attention of the cook.

If I take out parts, I will set the timer for 2 1/2 hours. I know I'm safe at that point. Then it goes into the refrigerator unless cooking very soon.
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Old 02-22-2008, 07:30 AM   #27
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I agree with Mozart. Just for clarification, my comments about thawing in the sink was with the assumption that a chicken was placed in a sink and left there for hours and hours and hours without doing anything else. I do often do sink thawing, but I do it in a sink full of ice water making sure the water stays very cold. I also only do this with small pieces (my whole birds I always buy fresh, not frozen, and use right away).
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Old 02-22-2008, 08:44 AM   #28
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From time to time I would unearth some lump of mystery meat in my freezer, and have a few laughs over what it finally turns out to be. I'm pretty sure though that nothing has stayed there longer than a couple months.

That's one advantage of a small freezer! Space is limited and therefore I can't buy too much and I need to keep my inventory moving. Also I remember someone saying that the freezer should not be kept like a morgue. Some image, huh. So I try to immediately use meat that I buy or buy closer to date of cooking.

Me, I'd toss out a two-year old vacuum packed chicken myself. Why? Because even frozen vacuum packed processed meats have expiry dates on them, plus the price of one chicken is nothing compared to the cost of medication or hospitalization for food poisoning. But this is just me. :-)
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Old 02-22-2008, 09:07 AM   #29
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Me, I'd toss out a two-year old vacuum packed chicken myself. Why? Because even frozen vacuum packed processed meats have expiry dates on them, plus the price of one chicken is nothing compared to the cost of medication or hospitalization for food poisoning. But this is just me. :-)
The point you are missing, Chopstix, is that there is no difference in potential for food poisoning between a week old frozen chicken breast and a 2 year old frozen chicken breast.

Whatever condition the chicken was in when put in the freezer is.....well.......frozen in time
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Old 02-22-2008, 09:15 AM   #30
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it`s not inconceivable for a significant amount of it becoming Freeze Dried and having the cavity filled with Ice that`s been forced out however.

I`ve seen that happen where there has Been no cavity and also vacuum shrink sealed.
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