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Old 04-20-2008, 05:53 PM   #21
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Mine get rinsed in cold water in the sink and then put in the HOT water in the dishwasher. I'd rinse in warm but.. it takes for ever for the water to heat up in the kitchen and I hate waiting. If dishes are not going to going into the dishwasher I use hot in the sink.
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Old 04-20-2008, 06:07 PM   #22
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Soap/detergents disperse more evenly in hot water than in cold - thus increasing their efficiency. Plus, hot/warm water helps to dissolve oils/fats - that's why we wash out hands with warm water - to break down the natural oils on our skin which can harbor germs.

Anyway - that's what I remember about the "logic" of washing up in hot/warm water.
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Old 04-20-2008, 06:30 PM   #23
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Septic systems are not harmed by bacterial hand soaps. Most septic tanks are at least 750 gallons with 1000 gallons being normal. The small amount of anti-bacterial agent that survives the hand washing process is quickly neutralized in the tank.

Even loads and loads of washing with bleach will not normally harm the functioning of a septic tank.

Since we continually add bacteria to the tank, it would quickly recover from any disruption in any event.
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Old 04-20-2008, 06:33 PM   #24
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How likely is it that there are nasties on dishes that one has just eaten from? If they are on the dishes, they were in the food, so the method used for washing is moot.
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Old 04-20-2008, 06:44 PM   #25
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How likely is it that there are nasties on dishes that one has just eaten from? If they are on the dishes, they were in the food, so the method used for washing is moot.
Not really, GG.

Mostly what you would find is bacteria that is common to the mouth, nose, and throat. You transfer it to the dishes by direct contact (silverware in your mouth) and by coughing, sneezing, dripping, drooling and so on.

Staph aureus is a common inhabitant of this region as well as your skin.
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Old 04-20-2008, 06:58 PM   #26
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How likely is it that there are nasties on dishes that one has just eaten from? If they are on the dishes, they were in the food, so the method used for washing is moot.
We're talking EVERY dish. I know I mixed an egg wash into a bowl into a container to wash my raw fish in yesterday. That was three containers the raw egg hit. Then I dredged my raw, egg washed fish in another pan. Raw, raw, raw. This person is washing containers where raw food has touched in cold water. I think that's extremely different than the plates our food is on.

My issue with utensils is I beat a lot eggs and speer raw food with a lot of my forks.
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Old 04-20-2008, 07:43 PM   #27
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Septic systems are not harmed by bacterial hand soaps. Most septic tanks are at least 750 gallons with 1000 gallons being normal. The small amount of anti-bacterial agent that survives the hand washing process is quickly neutralized in the tank.

Even loads and loads of washing with bleach will not normally harm the functioning of a septic tank.

Since we continually add bacteria to the tank, it would quickly recover from any disruption in any event.
That was my thought for the septic system, too. And I regularly have chlorinated water entering a septic system and it still tests good.

But the anti-bacterial soap has me baffled. I had no idea that you can superficially, or aerobically, build up a resistence. Interesting.
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Old 04-20-2008, 08:16 PM   #28
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We're talking EVERY dish. I know I mixed an egg wash into a bowl into a container to wash my raw fish in yesterday. That was three containers the raw egg hit. Then I dredged my raw, egg washed fish in another pan. Raw, raw, raw. This person is washing containers where raw food has touched in cold water. I think that's extremely different than the plates our food is on.

My issue with utensils is I beat a lot eggs and speer raw food with a lot of my forks.
I see what you mean. Still, as so many said above, it's the detergent and washing itself that clean the dishes, not the water temperature.
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Old 04-20-2008, 09:12 PM   #29
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i have a Kenmore washer that heats the water to 160F in the normal wash cycle. There is also a high temp cyle that takes the water to 190F. The difference is significant.
At the club I belong to we also have a dishwasher with a 190 setting along with heated drying. With the strong dishwasher soap.. those dishes come out sparkling!!!

As to the hot water from the tap. If it isn't hot enough to burn your hands, it isn't hot enough to sanitize anything.

Actually, I can see where warm water could be worse since it provides, at least for a short time the ideal situation for bacterial growth--warmth and moisture.... Perhaps cold is safer??????
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Old 04-20-2008, 11:14 PM   #30
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Soap/detergents disperse more evenly in hot water than in cold - thus increasing their efficiency. Plus, hot/warm water helps to dissolve oils/fats - that's why we wash out hands with warm water - to break down the natural oils on our skin which can harbor germs.

Anyway - that's what I remember about the "logic" of washing up in hot/warm water.
Would not the natural oils in our body serve more as a natural barrier to germs? (I don't know what the answer is, just seems that the oils our body produces is part of our defense, maybe the reason we are so suseptible to germs is that we scrub off our natural barrier.) Sorry, I'm typing aloud... just my questioning mind!
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