"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Cooking Resources > Food and Kitchen Safety
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 09-18-2008, 12:41 PM   #11
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Seattle
Posts: 246
In Europe eggs are often sold off a standard shelf. They are not washed as our commercial eggs are here. The egg as laid has a natural coating that will allow the egg to not spoil for weeks if not months. When we wash this off they must be refrigerated.

My Grand mother and Mom by extension, wiped the messy stains off with a damp dish towel and the eggs set in a bowel on the pie safe.

That said, Harold McGee in his food science tome On Food and Cooking 2nd ed. 2004, says that a day on the room temperature shelf is as four days of deterioration of quality in the frig.

I think the answer is to use all the eggs you can from your layers and when they produce too many for your consumption, have a hen for a fine Sunday dinner.
__________________

__________________
May you eat well,
Robert
Robt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-18-2008, 01:11 PM   #12
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Culpeper, VA
Posts: 5,806
Keep them in the fridge & don't wash them until right before use, & even then only if it's absolutely necessary.

When I raised chickens we only lightly rinsed the eggs if, for some reason, they were unusually dirty. This can be prevented if you collect the eggs often enough so that the hens don't get the chance to accidentally soil them.
__________________

__________________
BreezyCooking is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-18-2008, 01:20 PM   #13
Chef Extraordinaire
 
pacanis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: NW PA
Posts: 18,751
Accidentally is right, Breezy. Even when I had broody hens who were in the nestbox all day.... they didn't poop in the nestbox. I think the whole idea is to make sure they don't start roosting in the nestboxes.
From 5 minutes ago. Nothing but a little bit of shavings to brush off
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	eggs in nestbox.jpg
Views:	143
Size:	82.7 KB
ID:	5458  
__________________
Give us this day our daily bacon.
pacanis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-18-2008, 02:54 PM   #14
Master Chef
 
expatgirl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Texas girl living in Kazakhstan
Posts: 5,575
What is candleling? making candles? my grandmother had chickens and always kept the eggs on the counter........we're still alive and kicking 50 years later.......believe me she wasn't going to take you to the doctor.........you got by on herbal tea and camphophenique
__________________
The only difference between a "cook" and a "Chef" is who cleans up the kitchen.
expatgirl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-18-2008, 03:19 PM   #15
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Culpeper, VA
Posts: 5,806
"Candling" is when the egg - in its shell - is held against a strong light, enabling you to see any interior imperfections such as blood spots or - if you happen to have a rooster around - a developing embryo.

Since commercial egg producers don't keep roosters, they candle eggs to pick out & discard any that have blood spots (which, by the way, have absolutely nothing to do with the egg being fertile or not). That's why you rarely, if ever, come across blood spots in commercially-produced eggs.

I never bothered candling my hens' eggs because 1) even tho I did have roosters, we collected eggs several times a day so there was no chance of any of them turning into chicks, 2) blood spots, while perhaps not appealing to look at, are perfectly harmless, & 3) if we did happen to come across the occasional egg that had been laid in an out-of-the-way place & might have been there for awhile, it was easier just to discard it.
__________________
BreezyCooking is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-18-2008, 03:38 PM   #16
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: alabama
Posts: 124
My goodness, you people know a lot about eggs that I had never even heard, and I have always lived in the country. Let me ask another question that I have heard different opinions on. When you crack an egg and it has that white glob on it do you take it off or use it in cooking? I usually try to get it out but a lot of people don't. What do you all do? You probably are rolling on the floor laughing at my description , but hopefully you know what I am talking about(I just don't know what it is called)
__________________
schoolgirl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-18-2008, 03:50 PM   #17
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,362
Click here for a site that has a lot of good info on eggs.
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-18-2008, 03:53 PM   #18
Chef Extraordinaire
 
pacanis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: NW PA
Posts: 18,751
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
Click here for a site that has a lot of good info on eggs.
Why Andy..... Are you sending her to another site?
Shame on you
__________________
Give us this day our daily bacon.
pacanis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-18-2008, 04:12 PM   #19
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,362
Copyright rules prevent me from copying the entire site and posting it here.
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-18-2008, 04:18 PM   #20
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Culpeper, VA
Posts: 5,806
Schoolgirl - I know the "white glob" you're talking about, but my overwracked pea brain can't remember the name.

Regardless - just like "blood spots", the "white glob" is perfectly harmless & edible. It's just a matter of personal preference as to whether or not you remove it. Some folks, if making particularly smooth, creamy sauces or custards, do remove or strain it from beaten eggs before using them.
__________________

__________________
BreezyCooking is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:41 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.