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Old 08-03-2008, 01:53 PM   #11
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"not disagreeing with what you have said, but the term 'cayenne pepper', as used in culinary terms, can be a powdered mix of any chilli variety/cultivar."

Well, all I can say is - that terminology must stop IMMEDIATELY.
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Old 08-03-2008, 04:24 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by BreezyCooking View Post
"not disagreeing with what you have said, but the term 'cayenne pepper', as used in culinary terms, can be a powdered mix of any chilli variety/cultivar."

Well, all I can say is - that terminology must stop IMMEDIATELY.

in most parts of the world, it never started. One reason for the confusion is the use, in the US, of the term chilli powder to describe a mix to be used in the dish chile con carne, the mix including chilli pepper powder, cumin, salt and dried herbs. Chilli pepper in the UK is just powdered dry chillies, or used to be, until we started using US based jars of spices. So, I blame the US (and the French, who also use the term cayenne).

I thought Hot Portugal was an Anaheim cultivar?
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Old 08-03-2008, 06:04 PM   #13
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Definitely not the "Hot Portugal" I grew. Seeds were marked "Hot Portugal Cayenne", were long, thin, & BLISTERINGLY HOT - lol!

I've never had an Anaheim that wasn't just a meager step up from a regular Bell pepper heat-wise.
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Old 08-03-2008, 09:20 PM   #14
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Part of it is generic...The pepper part!

The word "pepper" used in this way, is an American generic word that refers to any member of the capsicum family. For example, what Amercians call bell pepper, is simply capsicum to almost everyone else.

So cayenne pepper is what it is called in America and it is called cayene chilli in other parts of the world. In most parts for non-hot it is capsicum and for hot it is chilli...And in America it's all pepper regardless of hot or not.

I hope that is of help.
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Old 08-04-2008, 12:40 PM   #15
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I think you will find it was called chilli pepper way before America was even thought of. It is not called cayenne chilli by anyone I can think of.

cayenne pepper = (any) ground chilli

cayenne chilli = the fruit of the variety (or cultivars) of the cayenne chilli plant
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Old 08-04-2008, 04:02 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by waaza View Post
I think you will find it was called chilli pepper way before America was even thought of. It is not called cayenne chilli by anyone I can think of.

cayenne pepper = (any) ground chilli

cayenne chilli = the fruit of the variety (or cultivars) of the cayenne chilli plant

I'm sorry but that isn't true. That would mean that you would call ground habernero peppers "cayenne pepper." Or ground dry jalepenos. Which would be wrong, in culinary terms.

The ground cayenne pepper I buy is ground cayenne chile peppers.

Maybe some purveyors sell you something else, but that doesn't mean that the term "cayenne pepper" can be used to decribe any ground chile pepper.

In the US "chile powder" is powdered dry chile peppers. "Chili powder" is a spice mix, with dry chles, cumin, garlic oregano and sometimes salt, meant to flavor chili (the stew).
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Old 08-04-2008, 06:32 PM   #17
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Originally Posted by waaza View Post
I think you will find it was called chilli pepper way before America was even thought of. It is not called cayenne chilli by anyone I can think of.

cayenne pepper = (any) ground chilli

cayenne chilli = the fruit of the variety (or cultivars) of the cayenne chilli plant
Jennyema is correct. Saying that cayenne pepper is any ground chilli, is like saying that tabasco is a sauce and only a sauce!

I am not able to post URLs yet. But you can try using Google to do an image search for "cayenne pepper" and then "cayenne chilli". (you can search one l "chili" or 2 "chilli"). You will then see that cayenne pepper and cayenne chilli are the exact same creature and that in America they are called pepper and chilli in other parts of the word.

That is the only difference...Location.
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Old 08-05-2008, 11:18 AM   #18
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Jennyema is correct. Saying that cayenne pepper is any ground chilli, is like saying that tabasco is a sauce and only a sauce!

I am not able to post URLs yet. But you can try using Google to do an image search for "cayenne pepper" and then "cayenne chilli". (you can search one l "chili" or 2 "chilli"). You will then see that cayenne pepper and cayenne chilli are the exact same creature and that in America they are called pepper and chilli in other parts of the word.

That is the only difference...Location.
No, I am sorry. The words cayenne pepper and chilli pepper are used synonymously, they both mean ground chillies, except in America, it would seem, where chilli powder means powder for chilli con carne. It is very rare that cayenne pepper (powder) means ground powder from the cayenne chilli fruit.

Quote:
"Saying that cayenne pepper is any ground chilli, is like saying that tabasco is a sauce and only a sauce!"
No it isn't, that's just a silly simile.
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Old 08-05-2008, 11:45 AM   #19
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Good grief guys - give it a friggin rest. If you folks who don't live in the U.S. INSIST on calling ANY ground red pepper "cayenne", by all means, knock yourselves out.

However, that does NOT mean it's correct. And you can argue & piss & moan all you want, but Cayenne pepper IS & ALWAYS WILL BE A SPECIFIC TYPE OF PEPPER. And if you do even the most menial amount of research, you will find the facts to back that up. It doesn't even need all that much research. It's simply true.

Just because you all want it to mean ANY type of ground pepper doesn't make it factually so. One can only hope that you'll at some time take the plunge & discover the wild & wonderful world of all the different varieties of hot peppers out there, instead of just relying on your obviously generic mishmosh & misnamed "cayenne".
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Old 08-05-2008, 12:25 PM   #20
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Good grief guys - give it a friggin rest. If you folks who don't live in the U.S. INSIST on calling ANY ground red pepper "cayenne", by all means, knock yourselves out.

However, that does NOT mean it's correct. And you can argue & piss & moan all you want, but Cayenne pepper IS & ALWAYS WILL BE A SPECIFIC TYPE OF PEPPER. And if you do even the most menial amount of research, you will find the facts to back that up. It doesn't even need all that much research. It's simply true.

Just because you all want it to mean ANY type of ground pepper doesn't make it factually so. One can only hope that you'll at some time take the plunge & discover the wild & wonderful world of all the different varieties of hot peppers out there, instead of just relying on your obviously generic mishmosh & misnamed "cayenne".

but you really don't get it.
Cayenne is a specific chilli pepper, there's no dispute, but what we/anyone calls cayenne pepper is a generic name for what the rest of the world calls chilli pepper, but the US doesn't because 'chilli pepper' describes that which is added to chilli con carne.

Look here:

"Cayenne pepper is considered to be misnomer by the American Spice Trade Association, which prefers the more generic term red pepper. Generally speaking any of a number of peppers are called cayenne."

If you want to disagree, disagree with your own American Spice Trade Association.

I rest my case,
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