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Old 07-16-2010, 07:20 PM   #11
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I thought I had mentioned that youngish leaves don't need to be cooked for very long.
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Old 07-16-2010, 08:23 PM   #12
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I thought I had mentioned that youngish leaves don't need to be cooked for very long.
In the Zuppa Toscana recipe I posted the kale is broken up and put into a bowl, then the soup is poured over the leaves when it is served.
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Old 07-17-2010, 02:33 PM   #13
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I thought I had mentioned that youngish leaves don't need to be cooked for very long.
But even full-size older leaves of flat varieties like "Red Russian" can be sauteed up in 10 minutes. That's not very long. I consider "long cooking" of greens to be 30-45 minutes or longer - what southern folks frequently do to thicker-leaved & bitterer (is that a word? Lol!) greens like Collards, particularly when cooking with a ham hock or smoked turkey piece. Kale doesn't need that kind of treatment. Heck, the recipes I've posted above were originally developed using full-size "Curly Blue" Kale, & neither required anything remotely resembling "long cooking time".

Again - you're entitled to your opinion. I just don't agree with it. And I use a LOT of Kale. Plus, I like a bit of "tooth" to my greens. I really dislike facing a grayish-green overcooked mess o' greens. But many folks like them this way, & there's nothing wrong with it. It's just not my cup of tea, & not a necessary way of cooking them to enjoy them.
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Old 07-17-2010, 09:02 PM   #14
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Well, I consider "long cooking" of kale to be 10-15 minutes, which is what I said in my post. 30-45 minutes or longer would make a mush out of it. In any case you are correct: different strokes for different folks. I don't think sauteeing is the best way to go for taste, but then, again, we all have different taste buds. I tend to go for "tradition" and longer cooking (till bright green is gone) seems to be the old way of doing things.

"Southerners love their greens. A time-honored tradition in southern kitchens, greens have held an important place on the table for well over a century, and there is no other vegetable that is quite so unique to the region. Greens are any sort of cabbage in which the green leaves do not form a compact head. They are mostly kale, collards, turnip, spinach, and mustard greens."


I found the above someplace on the internet, never kept track of where. I ask you, is there any food nicer than greens?








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Old 07-18-2010, 09:23 AM   #15
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Oh, I definitely agree with you there!! Collards & Turnip Greens aren't my favorites - much prefer Kale & sometimes Mustard Greens. Once in awhile I'll make a batch of "mixed greens" using all of them along with some sauteed onion & a smoked turkey wing or drumstick. I did recently come across a recipe (from the June/July 2010 issue of "Fine Cooking" magazine) that I might try next time I come across young Collards. It calls for slicing the Collards into julienne-thin ribbons & quick-sauteeing them with malt vinegar, garlic, crushed red pepper flakes, salt, & - believe it or not - a small dash of maple syrup. Sounded interesting.
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Old 07-19-2010, 02:31 PM   #16
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Oh, I definitely agree with you there!! Collards & Turnip Greens aren't my favorites - much prefer Kale & sometimes Mustard Greens.
Heaven Forfend! I grow & love my "7-Top" turnip greens.

Do you by any chance grow mustard greens? I am trying Osaka Purple and Florida Broadleaf this year, as a secondary crop where the peas were. So they are only a few inches tall now, but they grow fast.
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Old 07-30-2010, 02:26 PM   #17
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Hi,

There is a German recipe called "Gruenkohl" which is essentially Kale simmered in broth, mustard and with a thick slice of ham, and a few sausages are simmered with it. Served with boiled potatoes (usually to then be crushed together with the kale with your fork). Great winter dish. I don't have time to type my recipe at the moment, but the below one is pretty close:

-----

Try cooked kale and sausage as a winter comfort food. Germans celebrate winter with a "Gruenkohlfahrt", which is a brisk hike accompanied by schnapps and a warm kale dinner afterwards. Cooked kale is mixed with mustard, bacon and sausage for a nutritious dinner.
Makes 2 - 3 large portions
See larger image

Prep Time: 30 minutes

Cook Time: 1 hour, 15 minutes

Total Time: 1 hour, 45 minutes

Ingredients:

  • 1 lb. kale, about 12 oz. cleaned and chopped
  • 2 pieces of bacon chopped, or 50 grams of "Bauchspeck" diced
  • 1/2 onion, chopped
  • 2 tsp. beef bouillon
  • 1 T. mustard
  • Pepper
  • Various sausage, such as bratwurst, frankfurters or other
  • Thick slice of ham (optional)
Preparation:

Clean kale, remove the thick middle stem and chop. Blanch for 1 minute in boiling water and drain. You may also use frozen kale (looks like spinach) if you can find it (frozen kale is popular in Germany).
Brown the bacon in a pan, sauté the onion in it and add the kale. Cook for 2-3 minutes and then add water to cover. Stir in beef bouillon. Simmer for 30 minutes.
Add the mustard and stir. Place the sausages and meat on top of the kale and simmer for another 30 minutes. Pepper to taste, salt only after tasting as the meat is salty.
Serve with boiled potatoes and potatoes browned in butter and sugar.
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Old 07-30-2010, 06:34 PM   #18
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Flukx, how does yours differ? It looks terrific and now I want it to be winter! Too hot for it today, but YUM.

~Kathleen
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Old 07-31-2010, 09:29 AM   #19
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I use homemade beef broth. The amount is up to you. I usually have mine a little "wet", so a little bit of the simmered liquid on the plate -keeps the dish a little juicier if and when you smash the potatoes into the kale ;) I have seen it a bit drier as well, as I think the recipe above may turn out. Up to you.

I also use a bit more mustard and lots of pepper!
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Old 07-31-2010, 11:39 AM   #20
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You know this is on my "First Cold Day" menu!
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