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Old 09-05-2008, 08:58 AM   #11
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It's hard to say what to do, not knowing the product you used. But as a rule, fall is a good time to re-seed, week and feed. If you used a 'killer' did it irradicate the seeds as well, is it a preventative as well as killer, when did you put it down, what did the packaging say as far as time period before it's ok to replant? Do you understand what I mean?
Every manufacturer now adays has a toll free # on the packaging. Your best bet is to find that phone # and when answered, ask for 'technical services'. Those are the people that know the chemistry of the product and zone info for your area, and most effective way to remedy your problem.
Then tell them you want to replant and see what they recommend. Go to your local home center and see what they recommend and find all the produces that do the same, (their compeditors) and pick the best one for the buck$$.
All seed will tell you on the back the % of sucess of germination; ie., 82% - 56%, whatever, so you have to figure the other % is filler - sterile or weed seed. Buy the highest % for your buck. Plus the packages are usually for large sq. ft. areas. If you have just a small area, maybe you could grab a handfull or 2 from a new neighbor in exchange for a batch of cupcakes or one of your speciality food item. (And it's a good way to make friends with neighbors)
Whatever you decide to do, make sure you read packaging for temperature guidelines. Too hot will cook your seed.
And for those of you deciding to use weed and feed products, watch your nitrogen & phosporus content in your ground water. More isn't always better.
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Old 09-05-2008, 10:01 AM   #12
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This info is for Missouri, so dates for application of herbicides may be a little different for New York.

Don’t apply herbicides to control
crabgrass this late in the year



COLUMBIA, Mo. -Homeowners dismayed by unsightly stands of crabgrass in their lawns should forgo any chemical applications to control the pest this time of year, said a University of Missouri turfgrass researcher.
"Most people are concerned because this time of year crabgrass is seeding and putting out multiple shoots," said Brad Fresenburg. "It gets tall and bunches out so that homeowners think it is a serious problem and they need to do something about it."
Crabgrass is a summer annual grass that will frost off in the fall; for this time of year, there are no good products that are going to give complete control, he said. "There is no point in spending the money in trying to control it."
However, some broadleaf perennials such as plantain or dandelion can be a more serious problem for those who want to overseed.
You can apply broadleaf herbicides at this point, Fresenburg said, but there may be a three- to four-week reseeding interval, which means you can't reseed until the end of September.
Late September is still a good time to reseed, but anyone using a broadleaf herbicide should get started now, he said.
April is the recommended time to use pre-emergents for crabgrass and broadleaf weeds. Crabgrass usually appears in late April or early May, when soil temperatures consistently reach 55 degrees F.
Several pre-emergents containing dithiopyr (Dimension) or prodiamine (Barricade) are available for spring crabgrass control. Such products will prevent spring reseeding until they dissipate, but will not interfere with fall reseeding, Fresenburg said.
For more information, see MU Extension guide IPM1009, "Turfgrass and Weeds," available for download at http://extension.missouri.edu/explorepdf/agguides/pests/ipm1009.pdf.
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Old 09-05-2008, 10:24 AM   #13
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Late summer is a good time to seed your lawn


01:00 AM EDT on Sunday, August 26, 2007


By NANCY O’DONNELL

Albany Times Union
***


Whether you’re “over-seeding” or installing a new lawn, the window of opportunity is knocking. Now through mid-September is premier grass-seeding time in many parts of the country.
Evening temperatures are beginning to drop, giving way to heavy dew come morning. Remember grass seed needs to be kept moist, and morning dew can provide a healthy amount of this moisture during initial germination.
Secondly, roots thrive in cool soils, and over the next few weeks, the soil temperature is going to begin to drop. As soil temperature decreases, root development increases and a strong lawn begins with a strong root system.
Finally, by now, just about any weed seed that had planned on germinating this year has done so. Competition between grass seed and weed seed is now at an annual low; as a result, soil nutrients and moisture are more readily available.
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Old 09-05-2008, 10:30 AM   #14
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Thank you for all this great information - you guys are great! I threw the bottle of week killer out after I used it all up, I can go back to the store and read the packaging and get the phone number - I never thought of that. The temps here have been dropping but recently it's been over warm, upper 70's - upper 80's - I think that's too hot for the grass seed. I'll call the garden center and ask them also and tell them what kind of grass seed I do have, see if that will work. Thanks again for all the time spent in giving me info! :-)
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Old 09-05-2008, 10:42 AM   #15
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Good luck, LeeAnn. Let us know thumbs up/down on what you decide and the results.
And remember, have fun.
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Old 09-08-2008, 08:27 AM   #16
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Kids and I have been pulling up the dead grass, there is some green surviving! We'll just leave that for now and see what happens. The nights and mornings have been cooler - a very welcome thing from my opinion - maybe the time will come for planting soon?! :-)
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