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Old 03-28-2006, 09:50 AM   #11
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If your Tarragon "never tasted like anything", chances are excellent that you have "Russian Tarragon", which is absolutely worthless. Any packs of seed marked "Tarragon", are Russian Tarragon & shouldn't be bothered with.

Purchase plants - & only plants - of French Tarragon, which is only available as plants, as it doesn't produce viable seed.

Add your "Russian Tarragon" to your compost pile.
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Old 03-28-2006, 10:09 AM   #12
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I bought my seeds the other day but I've had a change of plans. I have the area all planned out but we have to replace windows that are above this area and we'll be stomping around and I think I best hold off planting them in the ground. Instead I'll be planting the herbs in various sized pots for eye appeal and some herbs need more room. Once we're done working in the area I'll transplant them.

I think I better go buy my trays and get the seeds started. Except, for the Rosemary.....I'll those seeds back. I found out it grows really slowly when started from seed.

I'm so excited!!
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Old 03-28-2006, 10:41 AM   #13
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Ok.......I've done my research for all the different herbs I plan on growing. Here are a few sites that have wonderful information for those of you planning on growing an herb garden.

http://www.gardenersnet.com/herbs/

http://www.ehow.com/center_12.html
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Old 03-29-2006, 07:38 AM   #14
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Allen, keep an eye on your thyme patch; I've never had any luck with it coming back, even here in relatively warm SC!
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Old 03-29-2006, 10:33 AM   #15
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I've had some herbs growing on my windowsill all winter and will be transplanting those and other outside in the coming weeks.
Gotta have my fresh basil and parsley.
I also keep bay, rosemary, oregano, thyme, lemon balm, and sage.
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Old 03-29-2006, 11:47 AM   #16
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I was at the store last night and realized something about my "tarragon". When I got my herbs going last year, it was in small pots in peat moss. It took while just to get sprouts, then to get the sprouts going in the dirt after I transplanted. I keep forgeting that I live way up in MI now, not in OK. Well, when I transplanted everything to the garden, I had them planted a little to close together. I also had the tarragon planted close to my lavender. Of the three of each little peat pots that I planted, only one plant came up, and I was never really sure what it was.

I looked at some Lavender seed packets last night, and realized that of the two kinds available, one doesn't bloom the first year. So, now I'm thinking that one plant wasn't tarragon, but Lavender. I'll let it come back this year, and see if it blooms.

I'm also going to see about getting some live plants this year, instead of starting from seed.

If my Thyme doesn't come back, I'm not really that worried, as I started Common Thyme, when what I wanted was Lemon Thyme, like we have at work.

I'm thinking about transplanting some of my chives into a pot, and pulling up the rest, as we don't really use them.

I had a bumper crop of sage last year, all from one plant. I ended up with 8 oz of dried crumbled sage, and I've barely made a dent into it over the winter. I have a few other sage plants that ought to come back as well as the big one (a gift from a neighbor), and I'm thinking I'm going to have enough sage to supply my boss for several months, or maybe co-workers.
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Old 03-29-2006, 05:28 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urmaniac13
Thanks for the tip Marm!!

Yes I know about the herbs tending to outgrow your expectations... The last year we planted them rather late, in August, but the pot was overflowing in our 50cmx15cm planter. We used them a lot, so we kept up with the growth but if we plant them this time in spring, it may really grow into a rain forest... however poor us, we don't have our garden or even a balcony, so this is all we can do!!
Cris has a garden space by the garage near the flat of his children/ex, we grow some rosemary and salvia, they also tend to overgrow... and we had to chop down the top of the bayleaf tree some month ago because it was getting way tall!!
The baay leaf is the leaf from a laurel tree. It can grow to 60 feet in height. It is a highly prized leaf and has been around since the days of ancient Greece. Roman emporeres wore Laral wreaths. The words poet laureate and bac-lauriete are titles using the honored laurel variation.

The bay leaf is believed to have medicinal properties and can be used with a host of foods, everything from chili and spaghetti sauce, to soups and pickling mixtures.

So remember, bour bay leaf tree is a tree, a laurel tree.

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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Old 03-29-2006, 05:34 PM   #18
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Do, however, keep in mind that there are MANY laurels out there, & many of them are POISONOUS.

The Bay Laurel, or Sweet Bay, is the one used in cooking, & is not just a leaf from any "laurel tree". It is not to be confused with the many native & ornamental laurels out there, which should not be taken internally.
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Old 03-29-2006, 07:26 PM   #19
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Originally Posted by BreezyCooking
Do, however, keep in mind that there are MANY laurels out there, & many of them are POISONOUS.

The Bay Laurel, or Sweet Bay, is the one used in cooking, & is not just a leaf from any "laurel tree". It is not to be confused with the many native & ornamental laurels out there, which should not be taken internally.
You get Karma for that one.

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Old 03-30-2006, 04:59 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urmaniac13
We are planning to restart our herb pot (well no pan intended, everything quite legal!! ) on our kitchen window sill!! We are going to plant flat leaved parsley, basil (both were great success last year.. though poor guys shriveled out during the winter...) also oregano and majoram... we may see if we can find some coriander seeds for planting, for growing cilantro!!

One question though... can we recycle the soil we used last year, after picking out the "corpses" of the crop from the last year? Or we need to replace it with a fresh soil? (we get those enriched soil for planting from the gardening shop...)
You really need to use fresh soil every year. Never scrimp on your soil.
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