"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Beef, Pork, Lamb & Venison
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 07-31-2006, 02:35 PM   #1
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Greater Annapolis MD Area
Posts: 257
What is the difference between chorizo and andouille sausage

This really several questions about sausage 1st what is the difference chorizo and andouille 2nd what is the difference between the fresh that is showing up in the super markets and the dried style 3rd what is the difference between mexican/new orleans and european style andoulle? Sorry this is so long, but I just had to ask.

__________________

__________________
Elf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-31-2006, 02:54 PM   #2
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Metro New York
Posts: 8,764
Send a message via Yahoo to ChefJune
There are two kinds of chorizo. The Mexican is a fresh sausage, while the Spanish is a dried sausage that comes in long links, like salami.

Andouille sausage is a spicy Cajun sausage. The French make Andouillettes, which are a different product altogether, and are not at all spicy, but are made with chitterlings. If you like those (aka chittlin's) you'll like Andouillettes.

Hope that helps.
__________________

__________________
ChefJune is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-31-2006, 04:02 PM   #3
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: In, but not from, Northeastern NC
Posts: 129
Having lived in Spain for four years, June's summed it up.

Ciao,
__________________
Order In, Food Out ~ It's NOT Magic!
Steve A is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-31-2006, 04:15 PM   #4
Executive Chef
 
VeraBlue's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: northern NJ
Posts: 3,683
andouille is a cajun sausage, chorizo is not. I am unaware of any mexican andouille product, so I doubt there is any comparison. Fresh is akin to sausage you normally associate with 'needing to be cooked' where dried is already cured..like pepperoni.

If you are seeking to make an authentic dish, I wouldn't substitute either for the other.
__________________
How can we sleep while our beds are burning???
VeraBlue is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-31-2006, 04:39 PM   #5
Head Chef
 
auntdot's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 2,417
ChefJune is right.

Used to get Portuguese chorizo when we lived in MA, a large Portuguese population, many were, and some still are, fishermen. Cajun andouille, the Portuguese chorizo and kielbasa are variations on the same theme, although they all can have a distinct flavor. I say can have because I have tasted variations of each that can sorta merge into one another.

Love Mexican chorizo but that is a different bird altogether.
__________________
auntdot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-31-2006, 04:41 PM   #6
Executive Chef
 
ironchef's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: The SPAM eating capital of the world.
Posts: 3,558
Regarding flavor, they are both spicy but they taste entirely different from one another. Usually, from what I've tried, chorizo will be spicier than andouille. I've tried some andouille that were mild at best. Your best bet would be to buy both and try them to see which that you like better.
__________________
"Boldness has genius, power, and magic in it."
Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe
ironchef is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-31-2006, 04:48 PM   #7
Master Chef
 
Chief Longwind Of The North's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA,Michigan
Posts: 8,144
Mexican Chorizo has a very loose and greasy texture. it is added to scrambled eggs, burritoes, etc, where it can add its flavor but isn't required for meaty chunks. It is also good when added to ground beef for chili.

Don't look at the ingredient list for Mexican Chorizo. You may not want to eat it if you do. Kind of like cheap hot-dogs.

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
__________________
“No amount of success outside the home can compensate for failure within the home…"

Check out my blog for the friendliest cooking instruction on the net. Go ahead. You know you want to.- http://gwnorthsfamilycookin.wordpress.com/
Chief Longwind Of The North is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-31-2006, 06:40 PM   #8
Sous Chef
 
skilletlicker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Memphis, TN
Posts: 918
Quote:
Originally Posted by Goodweed of the North
Mexican Chorizo has a very loose and greasy texture. it is added to scrambled eggs, burritoes, etc, where it can add its flavor but isn't required for meaty chunks. It is also good when added to ground beef for chili.

Don't look at the ingredient list for Mexican Chorizo. You may not want to eat it if you do. Kind of like cheap hot-dogs.
Goodweed's description of Mexican chorizo seems accurate for all the commercial products I've tried so far except that I disagree with the notion that they will add anything to "eggs, burritos, etc." Maybe I haven't found the right brand but I've yet to discover a useful purpose for the stuff.

There is, however, a completely different thing also called Mexican Chorizo that I make at home or buy at the meat counter of local Mexican market. There are a lot of recipes but this is a simple one I've been using lately. Some of the recipes I've tried use much more vinegar, and they acquire more of the commercial texture. I prefer this proportion.
__________________
No expert; just a guy livin' off his own cookin'

skilletlicker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-31-2006, 08:56 PM   #9
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 36,691
Check out this description of different sausage types. See especially, the Mexican, Spanish and Portugeuse chorizo/chourico.
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-31-2006, 09:02 PM   #10
The Dude Abides
 
TATTRAT's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Bermuda Native in D.C./NoVA
Posts: 5,299
Send a message via AIM to TATTRAT Send a message via Yahoo to TATTRAT Send a message via Skype™ to TATTRAT
Andoullie is Cajun, smoked, spicy, earthy goodness


Chirizo is more like a spicy, equally greasy, Mexican/Spainish, dare i say Pepperoni almost...?

I personally love them both, for different reasons: Gumbo is NOT complete without andoullie and file and okra...Paellia(sp?) is not the same without Chirizo...jmo.
__________________

__________________
flickr
TATTRAT is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
None

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off




» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

RV & Travel Trailer Communities

Our RV & Travel Trailer sites encompasses virtually all types of Recreational Vehicles, from brand-specific to general RV communities.

» More about our RV Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002-2012 Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:29 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Cooking News & Tips Straight to your Email!

Stay up-to-date with Cooking info to your inbox!

unsusbcribe at anytime with one click

Close [X]