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Old 07-20-2012, 02:05 PM   #11
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PanchoHambre hasn't visited the DC forum since Feb 5, 2009.

Is this wine we're discussing a sweet wine? ("dolce" can mean sweet, right?)
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Old 07-20-2012, 02:12 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by Greg Who Cooks View Post
PanchoHambre hasn't visited the DC forum since Feb 5, 2009.

Is this wine we're discussing a sweet wine? ("dolce" can mean sweet, right?)
ROTFL

I will not answer here and now, I'm too ashamed
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Old 07-20-2012, 02:23 PM   #13
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It's not unusual to get a bite in the arse from the past here on the forum. That's why some forums lock posts after a year or two...

I recall that "hambre" means hunger... Maybe Pancho starved shortly after his last post...

I'm still wondering if "dolce" in the context of the wine's name means "sweet."
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Old 07-20-2012, 03:30 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Greg Who Cooks View Post
It's not unusual to get a bite in the arse from the past here on the forum. That's why some forums lock posts after a year or two...

I recall that "hambre" means hunger... Maybe Pancho starved shortly after his last post...

I'm still wondering if "dolce" in the context of the wine's name means "sweet."
Hi Greg! I'm ready

The answer is no, this is no sweet wine: all the different varieties have a smooth, dry taste, slightly bitterish. "Dolce" means sweet both as noun and as an adjective, and "dolcetto" as a noun means a small sweet, but the name of the wine "dolcetto" comes from the sweetness of the grape variety used to produce it, not from the taste of the wine itself.

Ciao!
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Old 07-20-2012, 03:41 PM   #15
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Dolcetto tends toward medium body and lower acidity. I find them to be somewhat like Merlot: fruit-forward, easy drinking, and a good pairing with acidic foods.

Incidentally, dolcetto is the name of the grape variety used to make it. I think Luca may have said that somewhere, but if not, it's worth pointing out. Sometimes Italian wines are named for the grape. Sometimes they are named for the region. Sometimes they are named for both (e.g. Dolcetto d'Alba or Dolcetto wine from Alba).
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Old 07-20-2012, 10:21 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Greg Who Cooks View Post
It's not unusual to get a bite in the arse from the past here on the forum. That's why some forums lock posts after a year or two...

I recall that "hambre" means hunger... Maybe Pancho starved shortly after his last post...

I'm still wondering if "dolce" in the context of the wine's name means "sweet."
Dolce can also mean soft. In French the word "douce" is often used to mean sweet, but it mostly means soft.

I can understand if a wine is "soft", but not sweet.
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Old 07-21-2012, 04:06 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Kroll View Post
Dolcetto tends toward medium body and lower acidity. I find them to be somewhat like Merlot: fruit-forward, easy drinking, and a good pairing with acidic foods.

Incidentally, dolcetto is the name of the grape variety used to make it. I think Luca may have said that somewhere, but if not, it's worth pointing out. Sometimes Italian wines are named for the grape. Sometimes they are named for the region. Sometimes they are named for both (e.g. Dolcetto d'Alba or Dolcetto wine from Alba).
Thanks Steve!
And sometimes they are named for none of them, like Pagadebit from the Romagna region, which literally means "it pays the debt"

By the way, the Merlot which I find here come from the Friuli region, and they are way "tougher" to drink, not an easy drink I mean.
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Old 07-21-2012, 05:11 AM   #18
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Buon Giorno,

Thanks to Luca and Steve to upgrade this antique thread.

Steve: You are correct with messages on a bottle ...


dolce = sweet ( an adjective )

dolcetto = a red grape variety

di = of a place

al or alla = with

Have lovely wkend.
Ciao, Margi.
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Old 07-21-2012, 05:12 AM   #19
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Greg,

Thanks for your notice ...

However, it is an interesting thread none the less ...

Have nice wkend.
Margi. Ciao.
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Old 07-21-2012, 02:03 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Luca Lazzari View Post
Thanks Steve!
And sometimes they are named for none of them, like Pagadebit from the Romagna region, which literally means "it pays the debt"

By the way, the Merlot which I find here come from the Friuli region, and they are way "tougher" to drink, not an easy drink I mean.
Luca, I think most European Merlot leans this way. Some new world Merlot is what I would call "serious", but mostly it's made in a lighter style that is intended to drink young. I don't know if I've ever had 100% Italian Merlot. I usually see it blended in some of the "Super Toscano" wines. I'll have to look for that.

Pagadebit - that's quite funny.
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