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Old 04-22-2011, 10:55 PM   #11
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medtran45: This sounds like a good method. How long do you keep them frozen?
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Old 04-23-2011, 07:45 AM   #12
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Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
Food dehydrators typically run at much lower temperatures, typically 85 to 155 F. drying at a higher temp may degrade the taste and quality of the finished product.
Since tomatos are the only thing we do this way, not going to spend money on a dehydrator. Why would you make a negative statement when you don't know for sure that it degrades taste and quality? The OP was asking about using the oven and never mentioned a dehydrator directly, but they did mentioned not wanting to buy another appliance.

College-Web, we have a deep freezer so 6 months is probably the max. That is if they can get put up before I eat them as is.
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Old 04-23-2011, 08:50 AM   #13
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Food dehydrators typically run at much lower temperatures, typically 85 to 155 F. drying at a higher temp may degrade the taste and quality of the finished product.
Thanks for the info. Makes a lotta sense to go with 125F if you want to dry rather than cook the product.
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Old 04-23-2011, 06:10 PM   #14
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Maybe what the OP was talking about was roasting tomatoes. I have seen many recipes for roasting tomatoes at temperatures of 300-450 F. They all mentioned cutting tomatoes in half, quarters, or eighths, depending on the size of the tomato, not slices. The roasting times were from 45 minutes to several hours.
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Old 04-23-2011, 07:16 PM   #15
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Maybe what the OP was talking about was roasting tomatoes. I have seen many recipes for roasting tomatoes at temperatures of 300-450 F. They all mentioned cutting tomatoes in half, quarters, or eighths, depending on the size of the tomato, not slices. The roasting times were from 45 minutes to several hours.
Taxlady, the OP was asking about oven drying. A technique used by many folks. We use that technique and it works well. It is a viable drying technique. Mario Batali uses the technique, as do other chefs.
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Old 04-23-2011, 07:31 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CraigC View Post
Since tomatos are the only thing we do this way, not going to spend money on a dehydrator. Why would you make a negative statement when you don't know for sure that it degrades taste and quality? The OP was asking about using the oven and never mentioned a dehydrator directly, but they did mentioned not wanting to buy another appliance...
It wasn't a negative statement. It was a factor to consider in making a decision.

I was informed by a dehydrator company's representative that the machine I had was not appropriate for drying herbs because it operated at 140 F and herbs needed a cooler temp. - around 110 F. to prevent the loss of aromatic oils. That's fairly reliable info in my mind. I stated that quality MAY be degraded because I didn't know if that information applied to all foods equally.

Considering drying tomatoes - they're typically sun-dried. I'm guessing these tomatoes are sun-dried at temperatures closer to 85F than the lowest temp you can get in an oven.
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Old 04-23-2011, 07:42 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CraigC View Post
Taxlady, the OP was asking about oven drying. A technique used by many folks. We use that technique and it works well. It is a viable drying technique. Mario Batali uses the technique, as do other chefs.
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I know that is what the OP wrote. But the OP saw it on TV. People often remember details incorrectly. I was suggesting that possibly the show had been about roasting tomatoes.

From what I have seen, roasting makes the tomatoes much less moist and smaller. Many people do this for freezing, since it takes less space than with fresh tomatoes.

I think there is a continuum between what is called oven drying and what is called roasting. I don't know where the line is drawn.
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Old 04-23-2011, 09:19 PM   #18
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Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
It wasn't a negative statement. It was a factor to consider in making a decision.

I was informed by a dehydrator company's representative that the machine I had was not appropriate for drying herbs because it operated at 140 F and herbs needed a cooler temp. - around 110 F. to prevent the loss of aromatic oils. That's fairly reliable info in my mind. I stated that quality MAY be degraded because I didn't know if that information applied to all foods equally.

Considering drying tomatoes - they're typically sun-dried. I'm guessing these tomatoes are sun-dried at temperatures closer to 85F than the lowest temp you can get in an oven.
A dehydrator company representative is going to be biased to his product. Since you made a statement that is not substanciated by actual experience, why put it forth? We are, after all talking about oven dryed tomatos and not herbs. Why imply that there MAY be negative taste and/or quality issues if YOU have never used the process?

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Old 04-23-2011, 09:26 PM   #19
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Old 04-23-2011, 11:14 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CraigC View Post
A dehydrator company representative is going to be biased to his product. Since you made a statement that is not substanciated by actual experience, why put it forth? We are, after all talking about oven dryed tomatos and not herbs. Why imply that there MAY be negative taste and/or quality issues if YOU have never used the process?

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The description that the OP gave

"Gardening program on PBS today showed dehydrating tomatoes. Using paste tomatoes (San Maranzo or Roma), cut into fourths or eighths, lay cut side up on olive oiled baking sheet, sprinkle with sea salt, dry in oven at 200F for 4 to 6 hours. Then submerge in olive oil"

In my own opinion having done it both ways. PBS's way is not Dehydrating (drying) anything. It's roasting/steaming the tomatoes. Then taking the Tomato and submerging it in Olive Oil.To me that now makes them " Sun dried" Packed in Olive Oil. Kind of a gross way to do it. That's quite a bit of Oil isn't it?

Depending on the type and age of the tomato. Temperature's do matter. That's where the quality and taste factor in. And just for kicks safety storing them improperly in oil is a no no.
Some tomatoes have more water content.The older the Tomato the darker the skin will be. You have to use a dehydrator that has a lower temperature setting to achieve the right balance. Ever hear of not mixing oils and water together? You will never achieve removing the water content from a Tomato by doing it in the oven.

It's easier to burn in an oven at that recommended temp and time. I thought it was extremely salty. I ended up tossing out the whole mess.

The oven method that really isn't- You have no room for steam, water to evaporate away. It's trapped in the oven. Meaning you just steamed/ roasted the whole batch.
That's my own personal take on the subject for what it's worth. Sometimes it comes down to " Pics or it didn't happen!" I have no pics. The memory alone still haunts my taste buds.

I'm just sayin'
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