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Old 06-27-2008, 02:22 PM   #11
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turned out real good but everyone in big hurry to eat what was on their plate that they don't even let me know the difference. However, I did notice big difference and thankful you shared cause there are times when I feel to ashamed to describe how my meals t urn out as I think everyone knows how to prepare this and I should too. Now I do! Every little bit of advice helps. Appreciate and now I have some left over. What would you suggest I do with them? Trusting you know better than I do. T hanks again for the help.
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Old 06-27-2008, 03:05 PM   #12
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When I have leftover chicken breast, I usually use it for quesadillas, tacos or tostados, depending on what kind of tortillas I have on hand. If you're not into cooking Mexican style, then you might want to make chicken salad (finely diced celery, onion, chicken and some mayo to moisten) for sandwiches - or chicken salad is also good in a tomato that you've hollowed out. If you have enough, you can also add it to some rice pilaf that you've cooked with any vegetables you have on hand, for another meal. Leftover chicken breast is the most versatile thing around - like having money in the bank!
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Old 06-27-2008, 08:13 PM   #13
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If you're like me, you use alot of chicken breasts. I like to cook them up ahead of time and use them for sandwiches, salads, quesadillas, tacos, etc. But I keep looking for new ways to cook them without them drying out and being tough. Sometimes I saute them, sometimes poach them, but there is a technique that I modified a bit from an old CI magazine that I tried today and it really worked. Just what I wanted. So maybe it will work for some of you as well.

Preheat your oven to 450F and line a 9X13 metal pan with foil. If you have a rack that will fit n the pan, so much the better.

Take two large and meaty (about 1.5 lbs each) whole chicken breasts, not split, complete with skin and bone. Stand them in the pan, letting the ribs make a sort of rack for them to stand on.

Make a paste of 2 TBS soft butter and 2 tsp salt. Gently lift the skin from the breasts and use a spoon to insert 1/4 of this mixture under each half of each breast. Pat it gently to spread it around. Then, turn the breasts over and salt and pepper liberally. Rub about a TBS of oil all over the top of the breasts and then liberally pepper them.

Roast at 450F for 35-40 minutes, until an instant thermometer reads 160F. Remove from oven, cover with foil, and let them rest about 10 minutes, then carve. There is enough juice left in the pan to make gravy, sauces, or just pour over the chicken.

This chicken meat was SO juicy and well-seasoned. Very tender. You can use your imagination and come up with lots of seasoning ideas, but this is just a basic start.

Hope you enjoy. We did. We ate some for dinner and saved the rest for tomorrow.
Hi MexicoKaren,
A good classic method for roasting the crown.

Instead of placing the chook on a rack, you could use a mix of quartered, peeled onions, thickly sliced carrots and celery and quartered leeks, plus a bayleaf or two and use these as the base or rack on which to place the chook AND get another meal or two. Add a glass or two of wine/stock to cover the vegetable base but not the chook, put the chook on top, cover and cook. The vegetables which you use as a base could then be added to some additional stock, puréed and make a great soup which could be frozen, eaten for lunch etc.

All the best,
Archiduc
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Old 06-27-2008, 08:27 PM   #14
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Wonderful suggestion, thanks Archiduc.
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Old 06-28-2008, 03:50 PM   #15
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Wonderful suggestion, thanks Archiduc.

I agree! Isn't this wonderful? Sounds like would improve the flavor of the drippings and oh wonderful gravy. Thanks Archiduc, for sharing your suggestions.
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