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Old 11-13-2007, 01:17 PM   #1
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Question How Do You Cook a Wild Turkey?

A friend of mine just recieved a fully-cleaned, frozen wild turkey and is looking for some advice on how to cook it. I know that the meat tends to be much darker and stronger, but that's where my knowledge stops. Any tips or advice on how to roast it?

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Old 11-13-2007, 01:34 PM   #2
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I have only cooked one, and I found it indistinguishable from a domestic store bought turkey. I chickened out and cooked it in a cooking bag. It was delicious. I think I only cooked the breast in the bag. I simmered the other parts for soup and creamed turkey.
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Old 11-13-2007, 01:58 PM   #3
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Miss Baker...The wild turkey has less fat than their domestic counterparts. You can roast the bird, but you will need to baste more often to keep the meat moist. Or, as Miss Beth mentioned, the Oven Cooking bag will give you nice results. Add some onion, and celery to the bag, salt & pepper. Coat the bird with a good coating of butter. Cook at 350* until the thigh meat is 185*

Enjoy!
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Old 11-13-2007, 02:57 PM   #4
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...and the dark meat is inedible on any wild turkey I've ever had.
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Old 11-13-2007, 03:41 PM   #5
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I was under the impression that wild turkeys are all dark meat ??? It's been a while since I've had one, though.

PA Baker,
One thing you may want to consider when cooking it is if it was plucked or skinned. My friend did one years ago in the bag that was delicious. He had plucked it, which is a LOT of work.
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Old 11-14-2007, 12:38 PM   #6
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Thanks everyone.

I checked with my friend this AM and was told that the turkey is actually skinned. Does that make a difference? I told her my guess was that the oven bag would be the best bet in that case to hold in as much moisture as possible. Was I way off on that?
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Old 11-14-2007, 12:55 PM   #7
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Miss Baker you gave good advice for a skinned bird. Open pan roasting would require coving the bird with strips of bacon, etc. Tell your friend to cover the bird with plenty of butter...
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Old 11-17-2007, 01:53 AM   #8
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Cook it ?? I thought ya drank it
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Old 11-18-2007, 01:45 PM   #9
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The only thing I'd have to contradict here is the post that said cook it till the thigh reads 185.

You'll be eating cardboard if you cook it to that temperature. If you cook it to 185, the carryover will continue to cook it to at least 200. And the breast meat is always at about 10 degrees warmer than the thigh meat, so you're talking 210 for that. I don't care what you do to try and mitigate that, that's a dry bird.

A bird is considered "cooked" when the thigh meat is at 165 (used to be 180 until very recently; rules got changed). Depending on the size of the bird, you're gonna want to take it out of the oven at between 145 and 155.

As for wild turkey in general...it's good stuff, it's just not for everyone and takes a little getting used to. It's a bit gamier than your farm-raised birds that you're used to.
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Old 11-18-2007, 03:56 PM   #10
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I have a group of friends that are willing to pay me to brine and smoke their Wild Turkey. I have never really been a fan of Wild Turkey, but they all claim it is the only way to prepare it. Plus, after it has been brined and smoked, it can then be frozen and baked at their convienence.

-Brad
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