"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Chicken, Turkey & other Fowl
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 07-14-2007, 04:35 PM   #21
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 16
Hi All, I tried the Alton Brown Method, it was fool proof. My wife and kid loved it and it was the first time they tried it. I never was able to get a recipe as good until I went to an Egyptian joint and they served roast duck which was fantastic! They parboiled it and roasted in the oven while basting with butter regularly.
__________________

__________________
kalmen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-15-2007, 01:48 PM   #22
Head Chef
 
Chopstix's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Singapore
Posts: 1,323
Thanks Kalmen! I love duck. I've pan-fried the breasts and confit'd the legs many times before but have never roasted it myself whole. I'm going to check out AB's recipe. I like the term fool proof very much! And welcome to DC!
__________________

__________________
'Never eat more than you can lift.' - Miss Piggy
Chopstix is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-15-2007, 03:44 PM   #23
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 16
Thanks a lot! I feel welcome already... Actually, AB cuts the duck into four pieces for easy steaming... But I've tried boiling it whole and skimming the stuff that shows up at the surface and then roasting... That's really nice!
__________________
kalmen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-15-2007, 04:13 PM   #24
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Culpeper, VA
Posts: 5,806
Actually, to give credit where credit is due, Alton Brown's method is far from original. Julia Child has been "steam-roasting" ducks & geese for many years - long before Alton came on the scene.

In fact, I use Julia's steam-roasting method every year for my Xmas goose (since the goose is too large/long for my little rotisserie) & it turns out absolutely terrific every time with very little effort.

And if you like duck, you should also like goose. Same wonderful dark meat, but with a slightly richer flavor.
__________________
BreezyCooking is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-16-2007, 12:18 AM   #25
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 16
Hmmm... You got me thinking goose :)
I'll definitely research more into what you mentioned... My ultimate goal, is to find the tastiest method of preparation...
I would agree with you that AB uses no original methods, and we'd need to credit the original initiators of the method...
__________________
kalmen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-16-2007, 10:40 PM   #26
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Culpeper, VA
Posts: 5,806
You might be able to find Julia's steam-roasted goose (or duck) recipe online somewhere, but if not, it's in her book The Way To Cook, which I believe is still in print (I saw a copy at Border's Books just a couple of months ago).

This is a terrific cookbook to own - really good basic everyday stuff - nothing froufrou. My copy is virtually falling apart I've used it so often - lol!!! I can't recommend it highly enough.

(The recipe for "Roast Goose with Port Wine Gravy", which we've had every year for Xmas since the cookbook came out is reason enough to buy it. Talk about easy & delicious!!!!)
__________________
BreezyCooking is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-17-2007, 12:19 AM   #27
Head Chef
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Bloomington, IN
Posts: 1,129
Send a message via AIM to college_cook
Alot of people think that the fat in a duck is contained only underneath the skin, but the meat itself is also very very fatty. There are two things you can do to make your duck experience more enjoyable. First of all, score the skin. I can't stress this enough. There are large amounts of pure fat sitting between the skin and flesh of the duck, and to effectively render it away and leave you with perfectly crispy skin, score the skin and saute your duck meat over low heat. The low heat also gradually heats the flesh of the duck and will rener the meat contained inside. A properly sauteed duck breast will shrink to about 1/3 of the size it was when raw, and will still be a delicious medium rare in the center.

Another great thing to do with duck if you want to confit it, is to first cure it overnight. This does 2 things. First, it introduces flavor. Second, it draws out moisture from the skin. Next cook the duck confit (in its own fat) until it is falling off the bone tender. At this point, most people think their work is done. However, this leaves you with a very fatty duck confit. I like to store the duck in its own fat (refrigerated, the fat will sort of gelatinize and is a great preservation method) until I am ready to cook it. Befor I serve it, I like to roast the duck confit, which renders off any excess fat as well as leaves the skin perfectly crisp ( remember the cure?!). It has been said that confit is perhaps the BEST way to enjoy duck. Just remember to follow these steps to make it as tasty as possible.
__________________
college_cook is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-2007, 01:22 AM   #28
Sous Chef
 
Rom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Australia
Posts: 715
I LOVE duck!!! I buy the frozen ones, defrost and wash them nicely.
Cut it down the middle and flatten it
Mix, fresh chopped parsley, roughly chopped cloves of garlic and evoo, and rub it all over the duck, putting bits under the sking etc.
Leave it for a few hours/over night
Cook for approx-about an hour in the oven - turn it over half way - get rid of most of the 50 inches of oil it leaks. lol jokes
Roast some potatoes along with it.
mmmm duckkkk
__________________
Rom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-2007, 05:58 AM   #29
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 16
That's nice...
__________________
kalmen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-2007, 08:38 AM   #30
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Central Virginia
Posts: 3,381
" Roast some potatoes along with it "

Oh yes!!!! What temp do you roast it at?
__________________

__________________
Practice safe lunch. Use a condiment.
Loprraine is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
None

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:29 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.